New Year, New Magazine Team

February 18, 2014

By Steven Tippin

 

One of the greatest rewards that I get out of this volunteer position is the connections that I make. Almost daily, I am discussing something with one of the board members, or run into a member on the street, or even just look at someone’s site on the internet.  Connecting with great people is both a requirement of the position and a perk. I am pleased to introduce the two newest amazing members of our magazine team: Katrina Brodie and Robyn Weatherley. Katrina is taking over as Regional Coordinator and Robyn is settling in as Editor-At-Large and I assure you that these are two of the finest people I have had the pleasure to work with. We have a few new faces on the GAAC board but, seeing as you are taking the time to read this magazine, I wanted to highlight these two new faces that volunteer countless hours getting it to you.

 

Katrina, if you haven’t already guessed by her picture on the “Meet the Board” page, in which she is tossing popcorn to catch it in her mouth, is full of personality. She is a trooper, a fighter, and a very kind person; perfect for her role as Regional Coordinator. In this role, Katrina will be collecting, organizing and making certain that the articles from our contributors include all of the necessary items for publishing.  She is the direct contact with each of the reps from each region of this country, making sure that they have ideas for upcoming articles and that they have help with whatever articles they are currently collecting or writing. She comes highly recommended and, from what I have seen, she earns it.

 

Robyn is the other half of this magazine team in her role as Editor-At-Large. She has already proven to be very professional and logical in every aspect of her role thus far. She comes to us highly educated with an MFA in glass at Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, and earned her BFA prior to that at the Alberta College of Art + Design. She is perfectly suited for the role as Editor because she is efficient, concise, acts in a very professional manner, and is very aware of the art world. I am very happy that she has agreed to join our team. Both Katrina and Robyn have already come to me with great ideas to build upon an already great magazine that so many talented people have helped build.

 

There are no fewer than fifteen hardworking people volunteering their time to put each issue of this magazine forward. If I do some simple math, that roughly adds up to two hundred hours or just less than six weeks for one person; a working full time job. And these wonderful volunteers do it three times a year (and for free!). I would be remiss if I did not also thank Benjamin Kikkert, our outgoing Editor-At-Large and Regional Coordinator (who has now taken on the Vice President role) for getting the magazine to where it is now. Thank you, Benji, and thank you also to everyone who has contributed to the magazine in any way. You should all be really proud of it. I am.

 

Tags:  Steve Tippin, volunteers, Contemporary Canadian Glass, magazine, Katrina Brodie, Robyn Weatherley, Benjamin Kikkert, Tyler School of Art, Alberta College of Art + Design, Glass Art Association of Canada Board of Directors

 

 

Nouvelle année, nouvelle équipe au magazine

Par Steven Tippin

 

Les liens que je tisse au quotidien sont certainement ma plus belle récompense pour occuper ce poste en tant que bénévole.  En effet, il m’arrive presque tous les jours de parler avec un des membres du conseil, de croiser un artiste membre dans la rue, ou de regarder le site Internet d’un autre.  Réussir à réunir un bon réseau de personnes fait à la fois partie des conditions requises pour le poste et représente un avantage. Ainsi, je suis ravi de vous présenter deux nouvelles personnes de l’équipe du magazine : Katrina Brodie et Robyn Weatherley. Katrina reprend le poste de Coordinatrice régionale et Robyn nous rejoint en tant que Rédactrice collaboratrice, et je peux vous garantir qu’elles sont toutes deux plaisantes à cotoyer. Nous avons aussi quelques nouvelles figures au Conseil d’administration de la GAAC, mais vu qu’en cet instant précis vous êtes en train de lire notre magazine, je voulais mettre en lumière ces deux nouvelles personnes, qui vont fournir beaucoup de temps pour vous le faire parvenir.

 

Au cas où vous ne l’auriez pas encore deviné par sa photo sur la page « Meet the Board » où Katrina rattrape du popcorn au vol, elle a beaucoup de caractère. C’est une fonceuse, une battante et aussi une personne très gentille ; elle est donc parfaite pour le rôle de Coordinatrice régionale. Dans ce poste, Katrina collectera, organisera et s’assurera que les articles de nos contributeurs sont complets et prêts à être publiés. Elle sera en contact direct avec les représentants régionaux du pays pour s’assurer qu’ils aient des idées pour les prochains articles et les aider pour ceux qui sont en rédaction ou à venir. Elle nous a été recommandée, et force est de constater qu’elle le vaut bien.

 

Robyn assurera l’autre partie de l’équipe du magazine en tant que Éditrice collaboratrice. Elle nous a jusqu’à présent démontré son professionnalisme et sa logique dans chaque aspect de son rôle. Dotée d’un bagage scolaire fort, elle a obtenu sa Maîtrise en verre à Tyler School of Art de Philadelphia ainsi qu’un Baccalauréat au Alberta College of Art + Design. Elle est parfaite pour le rôle d’éditrice car elle est efficace, concise, très professionnelle et connais bien le milieu artistique. Je suis vraiment content qu’elle ait accepté de rejoindre notre équipe. Katrina et Robyn ont déjà fait de très bonnes suggestions pour nous permettre de continuer à améliorer ce super magazine auquel tant de personnes talentueuses ont déjà contribué.

 

Pas moins de 15 personnes travaillent bénévolement pour publier chaque nouvelle édition du magazine. En faisant le calcul, on arrive à près de 200 heures, ou un peu moins de six semaines pour une seule personne. C’est donc un travail à plein temps. Et ces merveilleux bénévoles le font trois fois par an (et gratuitement !). Quel oubli si je ne pensais pas également à remercier Benjamin Kikkert, le précédent Rédacteur et Coordonateur régional (qui est maintenant Vice-président) pour avoir amené le magazine jusqu’à son état actuel. Merci Benji, et merci aussi à tous ceux qui ont contribué de près ou de loin au magazine. Vous pouvez tous être fiers de vous. En tout cas, moi je le suis.

 

Tags:  Steve Tippin, bénévoles, Contemporary Canadian Glass, magazine, Katrina Brodie, Robyn Weatherley, Benjamin Kikkert, Tyler School of Art, Alberta College of Art + Design, Conseil d’administration de L’Association du verre d’art du Canada

 

Share

Issues in Glass Pedagogy: A Long Awaited Dialogue

By Koen Vanderstukken

 

From December 5th until December 7th, the first symposium on “Issues in Glass Pedagogy” took place at UrbanGlass in Brooklyn, New York. The event was organized by Andrew Page and sponsored by the Robert M. Minkoff Foundation.

 

Close to 100 department heads, faculty members, administrators, instructors and a small group of students came together to discuss the future of glass education. Approximately 18 presenters from the US, Canada, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic and Australia, shared their visions and experiences. Instead of giving a synopsis of all the presentations, I will give you a personal impression on the symposium as a whole and invite you to form your own opinion by visiting the Robert M. Minkoff Foundation’s website, http://www.rmmfoundation.org, where you can listen to all the audio recordings of the different lectures.

 

The event began on Thursday evening with a pre-symposium gallery tour and reception. Hauser & Wirth, Claire Oliver Gallery, Heller Gallery, and Nancy Hoffman Gallery were all represented. When I walked into the first gallery, arriving a bit late I found myself alone amidst several large drawings and two of Roni Horn’s installations from her show, ‘Everything Was Sleeping as if the Universe Were a Mistake.’ One installation consisted of ten solid glass objects in hues of yellow and green. The second followed a similar setup, but this time in hues of violet and blue. Both installations strongly provoked contemplation and when I left the gallery I couldn’t help but think that this was a perfect start for what would hopefully be a great symposium.

 

Roni Horn exhibition at Hauser & Wirth Gallery, where gallery director Barbara Corti offered her insights into this large-scale installation work.  Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

Roni Horn exhibition at Hauser & Wirth Gallery, where gallery director Barbara Corti offered her insights into this large-scale installation work. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

 

 

After a short but wonderful walk along the ‘High Line’, one of New York’s newest attractions, I caught up with the group of participants and continued the tour. We were treated to short presentations in each gallery and, by 7.30pm, we found ourselves meeting and greeting at a private reception hosted by Geoff Isles and the Glass Art Society. The symposium had begun.

 

On Friday morning, Cybele Maylone, Executive Director of UrbanGlass, welcomed all the guests in the auditorium of the St. Francis College, where keynote speaker Jack Wax kicked off the official program. Nine speakers would present before the end of the day, all strictly guided by Andrew Page who did a fantastic job of keeping everybody on a tight schedule.  As expected from such experienced instructors, the presentations were of a high caliber. To conclude the day, we all walked from the lecture hall to the gallery in the newly renovated UrbanGlass building. By that time, informal discussions were happening everywhere and it became clear that this symposium was indeed fulfilling its promise of a long awaited event coming to fruition.

 

Nearly 100 attendees huddled together in the cold UrbanGlass studio that morning, many wearing coats. The temperatures contrasted with the atmosphere in the room, more intimate and informal as the symposium entered its second day, and the dialogue began to flow more freely. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

Nearly 100 attendees huddled together in the cold UrbanGlass studio that morning, many wearing coats. The temperatures contrasted with the atmosphere in the room, more intimate and informal as the symposium entered its second day, and the dialogue began to flow more freely. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

 

Jens Pfeifer, head of the glass program at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam, and Marc Barreda opened Saturday’s presentation series in the brand-new studio of UrbanGlass. The space is like a dream come true for everybody who loves glass studios. Unfortunately, the ventilation system was working so well that we all had to wear jackets and open up some furnaces in between activities to stay warm, but this could not stop the energy. Another day of high quality presentations and a demo by Alexander Rosenberg, Glass Program Head at the University of the Arts, ended with a superb lecture by Rony Plesl and Klára Horáčková from the Glass Department at the Academy of Art, Architecture, and Design in Prague.

 

The symposium's final presentation was by the Head of Studio at the Glass Department of the Academy of Art, Architecture, and Design in Prague and an Assistant Professor there. Rony Plesl and Klára Horáčková gave a tour of student work showing several of their own and their students' design and art projects demonstrating a confident approach that accepts no boundaries. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

The symposium’s final presentation was by the Head of Studio at the Glass Department of the Academy of Art, Architecture, and Design in Prague and an Assistant Professor there. Rony Plesl and Klára Horáčková gave a tour of student work showing several of their own and their students’ design and art projects demonstrating a confident approach that accepts no boundaries. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

 

There is no doubt that the symposium was a big success and all participants would agree that a second edition would greatly benefit the glass community at large. But, to keep an open mind, Jack Wax urged us, in his opening speech, to “be honestly and brutally self-critical” and keep our focus on the initial intention of the gathering. Because despite the high quality of all presentations and the openness of the dialogues taking place, it did occur to me that words like ‘studio glass’, ‘glass artist’, ‘art glass’, ‘glass techniques’, etc. were still used for more than they perhaps should be.  And, as is the case in any situation where like-minded people gather, there is always the inherent danger of patting each other’s backs a bit too much. We have to, by all means, remain very conscious of the fact that, as educators, our primary concern should always be the students and not some self-indulging structure that serves the institution’s needs or our own academic visions.

 

The road is long and work has just begun, but thanks to the organizers of this symposium, a platform was provided to start up the dialogue that needs to take place. The intimate character of the event allowed for in-depth discussions in an amicable atmosphere and I am convinced that some long-lasting partnerships were established during these days. Let us hope that we can continue the conversation during similar kinds of events in the future. To that end, Jens Pfeifer and Marc Barred have already announced the startup of an online platform called ‘The Glass Virus.’ It’s a new “internationally operating ‘Think Tank’, dedicated to new strategies in glass art education”. It will definitely open up the discussion to the larger public. You can find it at www.facebook.com/theglassvirus.

 

The glass community is slowly maturing. It felt good to be part of this new step forward and it was fascinating to notice the differences between European presenters and their US or Australian counterparts.  One thing still felt strange, though.  Despite the fact that many glass programs function within a larger fine art, craft or design department, no one was there to represent those other parties.  And although a small group of students were present, no real platform was offered to hear their voices either. Considering the content of many of the presentations, it would have been fascinating to hear both groups’ critical feedback. After all, if we really care about our students and our position within a larger field, we cannot afford to exclude anyone. It will be interesting to see how this conversation will evolve and who will be willing to take the discussion out of our own comfort zone and past the limitations of the medium glass into a broader context of Art, Craft and Design.

 

But let’s take it step by step. Thank you, Robert and Andrew, for a fantastic and well-organized event. I’ll be looking forward to the next edition.

https://www.facebook.com/theglassvirus and http://theglassvirus.tumblr.com, last visited December 2013.

 

Koen Vanderstukken is a renowned sculptor and educator. His work has been exhibited in major centres around the world, from Amsterdam, Paris, Prague and Venice to New York, Chicago and Montreal. He has offered workshops and master classes in Europe and North America, in addition to teaching for ten years at the State Institute of Art and Crafts in Mechelen, Belgium. Since 2006 he’s been a professor and the studio head of the glass department at Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario, Canada.

 

 

 

 

La Question de la Pédagogie dans le Verre: Un Débat Tant Attendu

Par Koen Vanderstukken

 

Du 5 au 7 décembre a eu lieu le premier symposium sur la “Question de la Pédagogie dans le Verre” à l’UrbanGlass de Brooklyn, New York. L’événement était organisé par Andrew Page et sponsorisé par la Fondation Robert M. Minkoff.

 

Près de 100 responsables de départements, membres de l’éducation, administrateurs, enseignants et des petits groupes d’étudiants, se sont retrouvés pour parler de l’avenir de l’éducation en matière de verre. 18 présentateurs venus des Etats-Unis, du Canada, des Pays Bas, de la République Tchèque et d’Australie nous ont présenté leur point de vue et leurs expériences. Au lieu de faire un résumé de toutes ces présentations, je vais vous faire part de mon impression globale sur le symposium et vous invite à vous faire votre propre opinion en allant sur le site de la Fondation Robert M.Minkoff http://www.rmmfoundation.org , où vous trouverez tous les enregistrements audio des différentes interventions.

 

Dès le jeudi soir, l’événement a débuté avec une visite de la galerie en avant-première et une réception. Hauser & Wirth, Claire Oliver Gallery, Heller Gallery, et Nancy Hoffman Gallery étaient tous représentés. Arrivé légèrement en retard, je me suis retrouvé dans la première galerie au milieu de plusieurs grandes fresques et de deux installations provenant de l’exposition « Everything Was Sleeping as if the Universe Were a Mistake » (Tout dormait comme si l’univers était une erreur) de Roni Horn. Une des installations était constituée d’une dizaine d’objets en verre, tous dans des nuances de jaune et de vert. L’autre installation avait une disposition similaire, cette fois dans les teintes de violet et de bleu. Les deux installations invitaient à la contemplation et en quittant la galerie, je me suis dit que c’était une introduction parfaite pour ce qui allait être, je l’espérais, un grand symposium.

 

Roni Horn exhibition at Hauser & Wirth Gallery, where gallery director Barbara Corti offered her insights into this large-scale installation work.  Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

Roni Horn exhibition at Hauser & Wirth Gallery, where gallery director Barbara Corti offered her insights into this large-scale installation work. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

 

 

Après une courte mais sympathique marche le long de la “High Line”, l’une des dernières attractions de New York, j’ai rattrapé les autres participants et poursuivi la visite guidée. Nous avons eu droit à une courte présentation pour chaque galerie, puis nous avons tous pu faire connaissance dès 19h30 au cours d’une réception privée tenue par la Geoff Isles et la Glass Art Society. Le symposium avait alors commencé.

 

Le vendredi matin, la directrice exécutive d’UrbanGlass, Cybele Maylone, a accueilli tous les invités dans l’auditorium du St. Francis College et l’intervenant Jack Wax a débuté suivant la programmation officielle. A la fin de la journée, neuf personnes étaient intervenues, sous l’œil d’Andrew Page qui a veillé avec succès au bon enchainement du programme. Comme il fallait s’y attendre, les présentations faites par tant d’instructeurs expérimentés ont été d’une grande qualité. Pour conclure la journée, nous nous sommes rendus à la galerie située dans le bâtiment  fraichement rénové d’UrbanGlass. Les conversations informelles allaient bon train et il apparut vite clair que ce symposium concrétisait bien les attentes d’un tel événement.

 

Nearly 100 attendees huddled together in the cold UrbanGlass studio that morning, many wearing coats. The temperatures contrasted with the atmosphere in the room, more intimate and informal as the symposium entered its second day, and the dialogue began to flow more freely. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

Nearly 100 attendees huddled together in the cold UrbanGlass studio that morning, many wearing coats. The temperatures contrasted with the atmosphere in the room, more intimate and informal as the symposium entered its second day, and the dialogue began to flow more freely. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

 

Jens Pfeifer, responsable du programme verre de la Gerrit Rietveld Academy à Amsterdam et Marc Barreda ont tous deux démarré les présentations du samedi dans l’atelier flambant neuf d’UrbanGlass. Cet endroit est un véritable paradis pour tous les adeptes d’ateliers verriers. Malheureusement le système de ventilation était tellement performant que nous avons dû garder nos manteaux et laisser les fours ouverts pour rester au chaud entre les activités, ce qui n’a pas entamé notre motivation. Une nouvelle journée remplie de présentations de qualité, d’une démonstration d’Alexander Rosenberg, responsable du programme verre de l’University of the Arts, et qui s’est achevée sur un superbe discours de Rony Plesl et Klára Horáčková du département verre de l’Academy d’Art, Architecture et Design de Prague.

 

The symposium's final presentation was by the Head of Studio at the Glass Department of the Academy of Art, Architecture, and Design in Prague and an Assistant Professor there. Rony Plesl and Klára Horáčková gave a tour of student work showing several of their own and their students' design and art projects demonstrating a confident approach that accepts no boundaries. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

The symposium’s final presentation was by the Head of Studio at the Glass Department of the Academy of Art, Architecture, and Design in Prague and an Assistant Professor there. Rony Plesl and Klára Horáčková gave a tour of student work showing several of their own and their students’ design and art projects demonstrating a confident approach that accepts no boundaries. Photo by Andrew Page, courtesy Robert M. Mlnkoff Foundation

 

Nul doute que ce symposium a été un franc succès et les participants sont largement d’accord pour dire qu’une seconde édition serait bénéfique pour l’ensemble de la communauté du verre. Mais pour conserver notre ouverture d’esprit, Jack Wax avais clairement mentionné dans son discours d’ouverture l’importance de rester le plus honnête possible, de faire preuve d’auto- critique et de ne pas perdre de vue l’objectif initial du rassemblement. Car en dépit de la grande qualité des interventions et de la transparence des dialogues qui ont eu lieu, il m’est arrivé de penser que certains mots tels qu’ ‘atelier verrier’, ‘artiste verrier’, ‘verre d’art’, ‘techniques du verre’, etc. étaient peut être employés à outrance. Comme très souvent dans les situations où se côtoient des personnes d’avis similaires, le risque de se caresser un peu trop dans le sens du poil est fort. En tant qu’enseignants, nous devons toujours veiller à nous soucier des étudiants avant tout, et non de choses qui faciliteraient des besoins institutionnels ou nos intérêts académiques.

 

La route est longue et le travail ne fait que commencer, mais grâce aux organisateurs du symposium, une plateforme a été ouverte pour permettre le débat. Le côté réfléchi de l’événement a permis de donner lieu à des discussions approfondies dans une atmosphère détendue et je suis convaincu que ces journées ont été propices à la création de partenariats durables. Espérons que nous pourrons poursuivre le débat au cours d’événements similaires dans le futur. A cette fin, Jens Pfeifer et Marc Barred nous ont déjà annoncé la création d’une plateforme internet appelée ‘The Glass Virus’. C’est un nouveau « groupe de réflexion international en ligne dédié aux nouvelles stratégies en matière d’éducation dans l’art du verre »  . Ce sera assurément un bon moyen d’ouvrir la discussion à un plus large public. Vous pouvez aller jeter un œil sur www.facebook.com/theglassvirus.

 

 

La communauté du verre est progressivement en train de se dessiner. Etre partie intégrante de ce pas en avant supplémentaire fut très agréable et j’ai observé avec beaucoup d’intérêt les différences entre les intervenants venant d’Europe et leurs homologues américains et australiens. Une chose m’a pourtant parue étrange. En dépit du fait que la majorité des programmes d’enseignement du verre soient intégrés au sein d’un groupement artistique plus large, souvent d’un département d’artisanat ou de design, personne n’était présent pour représenter ces autres départements. Et malgré la présence d’un petit groupe d’étudiant, aucun réel moyen n’avait été mis en place pour leur permettre donner leur avis. Vu le thème de la plupart des présentations, il aurait été très intéressant de connaître l’avis objectif de ces groupes. Après tout, si nous voulons vraiment nous soucier de nos étudiants et de notre position au sens plus large, nous devons veiller à n’exclure personne. Je suis curieux de voir de quelle façon ce débat va évoluer, et qui se lancera pour pousser la discussion en dehors de ses zones de confort et permettre au verre de franchir ses barrières en tant que matériau pour s’inclure dans le contexte plus large de l’Art, de l’Artisanat et du Design.

 

Mais chaque chose en son temps. Merci Robert et Andrew, pour ce fabuleux événement si bien organisé. J’ai hâte de participer à sa prochaine édition.

https://www.facebook.com/theglassvirus et http://theglassvirus.tumblr.com, dernière visite en Décembre 2013.

 

Koen Vanderstukken est un sculpteur et enseignant renommé. Son travail a été exposé dans des centres importants du monde, à Amsterdam, Paris, Prague et Venise ainsi qu’à New York, Chicago et Montréal. Il a tenu des séminaires et des cours de master en Europe et en Amérique du Nord, en plus d’enseigner pendant 10 ans au State Institute of Art and Crafts de Mechelen en Belgique. Depuis 2006, il est professeur et responsable de l’atelier du département verre du Sheridan College à Oakville en Ontario, Canada. 

Share

FUSION Glass Mentorship

Written by the artists, collected by Jerre Davidson

 

In October 2012, a group of glass and clay artists – Camilla Clarizio, Jerre Davidson, Valerie Anne Dennis, Marlene Kawalez, Debbie Ebanks Schlums, Laurie Spieker, George Whitney, Cheryl Wilson Smith, and Bridget Wilson – met for the first time at Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario. They were the chosen participants of the first Glass Mentorship Program sponsored by FUSION – The Ontario Clay and Glass Association. The aim of the program is to help practicing artists take their work in new directions.  Some of the group travelled from as far away as Northern Ontario and Montreal to participate in this exciting opportunity.

 

Fusion Mentorship. L to R: Camilla Clarizio, Marlene Kawalez, Laurie Spieker, Cheryl Wilson Smith, Koen Vanderstukken, Valerie Dennis, Bridget Wilson, Jerre Davidson, George Whitney, and Debbie Ebanks Schlums

Fusion Mentorship.
L to R: Camilla Clarizio, Marlene Kawalez, Laurie Spieker, Cheryl Wilson Smith, Koen Vanderstukken, Valerie Dennis, Bridget Wilson, Jerre Davidson, George Whitney, and Debbie Ebanks Schlums

 

During the next twelve months, under the steady guidance of Koen Vanderstukken, Glass Studio Head at Sheridan College and a renowned international artist, we worked separately in our own studios, meeting monthly to discuss ideas and progress.  Initially, the focus was on finding out

about each participant, with individual presentations about current and previous work, sources of inspiration and future plans. As we became comfortable together, we were given individually-tailored assignments that related to our own work.  We would then present these assignments and discuss the feedback that arose from the group. This was an extremely valuable exercise as we not only benefitted from the experience and knowledge of our mentor, Koen, but also from our eight fellow “mentees” as well, all of whom had different life experiences and ideas to share. We were encouraged to take chances and to move out of our comfort zones to work towards a greater exploration of our chosen materials in order to gain a strong grasp on concept, perception and the lasting significance of our work.

 

Koen, with generosity and dedication, encouraged us to think deeply about what we were doing and to question why we were using glass. At each step, he encouraged us to step back and examine our intent with the work and to question if it was successful in conveying that intent.

 

Exhibition at Living Arts Centre. Postcard shows work by Laurie Spieker.

Exhibition at Living Arts Centre.
Postcard shows work by Laurie Spieker.

 

The culmination of the mentorship was a group show.  “Push” was presented at the Living Arts Centre in Mississauga from November 28 to January 18th.  We chose the name “Push” as it felt appropriate for what we have gone through this past year – we were “pushed” by Koen, by ourselves and by each other to try new things and to work harder. In the show, there were two works or groups of work from each artist and the exhibit showcased a startling diversity of form which resulted in a cohesive and interesting display.

 

The Work:

 

Camilla Clarizio presented groups of clay figures that symbolized a moment, a thought frozen in time through the heat of the kiln.  Her sculptures were a culmination of tempests survived, dreams achieved, futures imagined.

 

Jerre Davidson’s two swirling sculptural works, entitled “Opus”, resembled geological landscape formations and achieved her underlying goal to communicate the movements and rhythms within that landscape.

 

Davidson, Jerre. Opus II Kiln Formed Glass, 18” (h) x 31” (w) x 8” (d)

Davidson, Jerre.
Opus II
Kiln Formed Glass, 18” (h) x 31” (w) x 8” (d)

 

Valerie Dennis created cast pieces that represented the guiding principles of geometry and symmetry.

 

Marlene Kawalez’s sculptures, amalgamating glass and clay, created both a haunting and dimensional image for the viewer to interpret.

 

Debbie Ebanks Schlums, in collaboration with Don Miller, transported the glass outhouse from their site-specific installation, “On the Fence”, as a comment on private and public space.

 

Laurie Spieker used kiln-formed murinni and millefiori in her effort to capture those small but unnoticed marvels of nature. By laying down swathes of pulled murinne colour or encasing millefiore in clear glass, the full beauty of the miniature was revealed.

 

George Whitney created glass sculptures based on the shapes of classic cars. His goal to work on larger castings was achieved with an impressive casting named “Ghost” that stands two feet tall and weighs 150 pounds.  Through the variations in glass thicknesses, his castings offered intriguing views of light and shadow.

 

Cheryl Wilson Smith’s delicate complex sculptures were created by forming countless individual layers of glass frit. They seemed light as a feather and looked as though they were barely held together.

 

Wilson Smith, Cheryl Winters Broch Cast Frit, 4” (h) x 4” (w) x 4” (d)

Wilson Smith, Cheryl
Winters Broch
Cast Frit, 4” (h) x 4” (w) x 4” (d)

 

Bridget Wilson created delicately woven sculptural pieces, one of was a vibrant red weave draped over a frosted glass casting.  The resulting combination demonstrated an intriguing and captivating contrast of techniques.

 

Wilson, Bridget Flow Cast and Kiln Formed Glass, 8” (h) x 16” (w) x 1.5” (d)

Wilson, Bridget
Flow
Cast and Kiln Formed Glass, 8” (h) x 16” (w) x 1.5” (d)

 

Koen Vanderstukken’s interactive piece, presenting images about how we see ourselves, was very popular. Looking in the small lens, you could see yourself on the screen at the back (on television, as it were).

 

Though the Mentorship Program has come to an end, these artists have forged a lasting relationship both professionally and personally. They plan to continue meeting and collaborating, and will have a second group show this summer at The Thunder Bay Art Gallery.

 

Given such an inspiring and productive program, it was clear that this was a wonderful opportunity. These artists collectively encourage other artists to seek out and participate in similar future programs.  Consider yourself PUSHED!

 

 

 

Séminaire FUSION, mentorat pour verriers

Ecrit par les artistes, propos recueillis par Jerre Davidson

 

En octobre 2012, les artistes verriers et céramistes – Camilla Clarizio, Jerre Davidson, Valerie Anne Dennis, Marlene Kawalez, Debbie Ebanks Schlums, Laurie Spieker, George Whitney, Cheryl Wilson Smith et Bridget Wilson – se rencontraient pour la première fois au Sheridan College à Oakville en Ontario. Ils ont été sélectionnés pour participer au premier séminaire Glass Mentorship Program parrainé par FUSIONThe Ontario Clay and Glass Association. Le but de ce programme est d’aider les artistes à aborder de nouveaux axes de travail. Certains sont venus du nord de l’Ontario et même de Montréal pour participer à cette magnifique opportunité.

 

Fusion Mentorship. L to R: Camilla Clarizio, Marlene Kawalez, Laurie Spieker, Cheryl Wilson Smith, Koen Vanderstukken, Valerie Dennis, Bridget Wilson, Jerre Davidson, George Whitney, and Debbie Ebanks Schlums

Fusion Mentorship.
L to R: Camilla Clarizio, Marlene Kawalez, Laurie Spieker, Cheryl Wilson Smith, Koen Vanderstukken, Valerie Dennis, Bridget Wilson, Jerre Davidson, George Whitney, and Debbie Ebanks Schlums

 

Pendant un an, et sous la supervision de l’artiste de renommée internationale Koen Vanderstukken, en charge de l’atelier verrier du Sheridan College, nous avons travaillé chacun dans nos ateliers respectifs, en nous réunissant tous les mois pour parler de nos idées et de notre progression. Au départ, le but était d’apprendre à connaître chaque participant par le biais de présentations individuelles sur nos projets actuels et passés, nos sources d’inspiration et nos projets futurs. Une fois familiarisés aux autres, on nous a donné des exercices individuels en lien avec notre travail. Puis nous les avons présentés et le groupe a pu donner son avis. Cet exercice a été très bénéfique et nous a permis de profiter de l’expérience et des connaissances de notre mentor Koen, ainsi que des huit autres participants, forts d’idées et d’expériences à partager. Cela nous a incités à sortir de nos zones de confort pour aller vers une exploration plus large de nos matériaux et gagner une solide compréhension du contexte, de la perception et de la symbolique à long terme de notre activité.

 

Généreux et dévoué, Koen nous a encouragés à réfléchir à nos activités et nous a demandé pourquoi nous utilisions le verre. À chaque étape, il nous a encouragé à prendre du recul pour comprendre notre intention et voir si nous parvenions à transmettre cette intention dans notre travail.

 

Exhibition at Living Arts Centre. Postcard shows work by Laurie Spieker.

Exhibition at Living Arts Centre.
Postcard shows work by Laurie Spieker.

 

Pour clore le séminaire en beauté, le groupe a présenté l’exposition « Push » au Living Arts Centre de Mississauga du 28 novembre 2013 au 18 janvier 2014. Le choix du titre de l’exposition « Push » nous a semblé approprié afin d’exprimer notre sentiment de cette année passée à être propulsé en avant par Koen, par nous-même et par chacun du groupe pour explorer de nouvelles choses et pour travailler plus fort. Chaque artiste a présenté deux œuvres pour composer une exposition étonnante par la diversité des formes, à la fois intéressantes et unifiées.

 

Les oeuvres :

 

Camilla Clarizio a présenté des groupes de figurines en argile symbolisant un moment ou une pensée figée dans le temps grâce à la cuisson du four. Ses sculptures étaient l’aboutissement de tempêtes bravées, de rêves accomplis et de futurs imaginés.

 

Jerre Davidson a présenté deux sculptures tourbillonnantes intitulées « Opus ». Rappelant les formations géologiques des paysages, leur objectif de communiquer les mouvements et les rythmes du paysage fut une réussite.

 

Davidson, Jerre. Opus II Kiln Formed Glass, 18” (h) x 31” (w) x 8” (d)

Davidson, Jerre.
Opus II
Kiln Formed Glass, 18” (h) x 31” (w) x 8” (d)

 

Valerie Anne Dennis a créé des pièces en pâte de verre démontrant les principes essentiels de la géométrie et de la symétrie.

 

Les sculptures de Marlene Kawalez mêlant le verre et l’argile donnaient au spectateur une image à la fois troublante et multidimensionnelle.

 

Debbie Ebanks Schlums en collaboration avec Don Miller a transporté le verre « On the Fence » en dehors des installations prévues pour souligner la ligne entre l’espace public et l’espace privé.

 

Laurie Spieker a employé des murinne et des millefiori thermoformés pour capter les petites merveilles de la nature qui passent inaperçues. En agençant des bandes de murinne de couleur ou en intégrant des millefiore dans du verre translucide, elles révèlent toute la beauté du monde miniature.

 

George Whitney a créé des sculptures en verre en s’inspirant des formes des voitures anciennes. Il a atteint son objectif en créant une pièce imposante en pâte de verre appelée « Ghost », mesurant 53 cm de hauteur et pesant 68 kilos. À travers les variations d’épaisseur du verre, ses pièces offrent des visions intrigantes d’ombre et de lumière.

 

Les sculptures délicates et complexes de Cheryl Wilson Smith ont été réalisées en superposant de nombreuses couches de fritte de verre. Semblant légères comme des plumes, on pourrait penser qu’elles tiennent à peine ensemble.

 

Wilson Smith, Cheryl Winters Broch Cast Frit, 4” (h) x 4” (w) x 4” (d)

Wilson Smith, Cheryl
Winters Broch
Cast Frit, 4” (h) x 4” (w) x 4” (d)

 

Bridget Wilson a créé des sculptures délicates, drapées d’un tissage rouge vif sur une pâte de verre dépolie. Cette combinaison de techniques permet un contraste à la fois captivant et intriguant.

 

Wilson, Bridget Flow Cast and Kiln Formed Glass, 8” (h) x 16” (w) x 1.5” (d)

Wilson, Bridget
Flow
Cast and Kiln Formed Glass, 8” (h) x 16” (w) x 1.5” (d)

 

L’œuvre interactive de Koen Vanderstukken a eu beaucoup de succès puisqu’elle présentait des images sur la façon dont nous nous percevons. En regardant dans une petite lentille, nous pouvions s’observer sur un écran de télévision.

 

Bien que le séminaire Glass Mentorship Program soit terminé, les artistes ont tissé des liens professionnels et personnels durables. Ils ont d’ailleurs prévu de se rencontrer pour collaborer et pour présenter une deuxième exposition de groupe cet été à la Thunder Bay Art Gallery.

 

Avec un programme si productif et si inspirant, l’expérience a vraiment été fabuleuse. À l’avenir, les artistes participants encourageront certainement d’autres artistes à chercher et à participer à des séminaires semblables. Vous serez propulsés en avant, PUSHED !

 

Share

Art Toronto: Insight from Both a Visitor and Exhibitor

By Silvia Taylor

 

Dante Marioni. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Dante Marioni.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

Art Toronto has a reputation for being one of the most prestigious art exhibitions in Toronto, featuring a variety of galleries worldwide. It takes place once a year and is hosted by Informa Canada Inc., who also produce the Interior Design Show, One Of A Kind Shows, and The Artist Project.

 

Irene Frolic. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Irene Frolic.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

The show expands throughout the entire upper level of the International Convention Centre, which is located on Front Street. The landscape of fake walls, spot lighting, high-priced works, and red stickers creates a certain extravagant energy fit for wealthy people in fancy clothing. It makes for an impressive environment. Galleries, magazines, schools, associations, emerging artist galleries, publications, non-for profit galleries, and sponsors occupy the booths.

 

Thomas Scoon. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Thomas Scoon.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

Greg Fidler. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Greg Fidler.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

I compiled a list of five galleries that I found stood out for presentation, quality of work, and use of 3D materials. Mike Weiss Gallery from New York featured a nearly full booth of metal sculptures by Kenney Mencher. Tezukayama Gallery from Japan featured kinetic works by Satoru Tamura that were unbelievable. Studio 21 from Halifax featured works from Canadian ceramists Jason Holley, as well as other craft works and sculptures. Gallery Jones of Vancouver featured a mix of 2D and 3D artists of many media, including Brendan Tang. The only glass gallery in the show was Sandra Ainsley Gallery.

 

Leah Wingfield and Steven Clements. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Leah Wingfield and Steven Clements.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

Surprisingly, there was little glass to be seen apart from that in Sandra Ainsley’s booth, and I think that worked in her favour.  Rightly so, as Sandra’s collection featured Dante Marione, Irene Frolic, Thomas Scoon, Greg Fidler, Leah Wingfield and Steven Clements, Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman, and many more.

 

Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

 

I interviewed Jesse Bromm to try to get a sense of what it is like to be an emerging artist showing at an international exhibition. Jesse is currently an artist-in-residence at Harbourfront. During the show, Neubacher Shor Contemporary Gallery featured Jesse’s work.

 

Jesse Bromm. Landscape Series. (photo credit:  Jesse Bromm)

Jesse Bromm.
Landscape Series.
(photo credit: Jesse Bromm)

 

How did you become connected with Neubacher Shor Contemporary?

I met them briefly at The Artist Project, but only really started to connect because the guy I get most of my shotgun shells from (whom I also met at The Artist Project) is a good friend of Manny, one of the owners.

 

What was your experience like at the expo?

It was great. It was kind of last-minute, but it was nice to just drop off work and not have to man the booth. Even with the gallery taking a cut, it was one of my best shows money-wise.

 

How is working with NSC gallery?

These guys were great; fun to talk to and 1000 times more knowledgeable about the Toronto art scene then I am. I also met a couple other artists represented by them and they were also very nice and insightful.

Do you see a future in exhibiting your work in shows like this?

I would do this show again, yes. The pull a gallery has is really incredible.  If I wanted to sell more high-end works, I think this may be the best way.

 

 

Silvia Taylor is a graduate of Sheridan’s Crafts and Design program.  She is currently a full time artist-in-residence in the glass studio at Toronto’s Harbourfront Centre.

 

 

 

Art Toronto : vision d’un visiteur et d’un exposant

Par Silvia Taylor

 

Dante Marioni. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Dante Marioni.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

Art Toronto est connue pour être l’une des expositions d’art les plus prestigieuses de Toronto, proposant tout un choix de galeries venues du monde entier. Elle a lieu une fois par an et est reçue par Informa Canada Inc. qui produit aussi Interior Design Show, One Of a Kind Shows et The Artist Project.

 

Irene Frolic. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Irene Frolic.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

L’exposition s’étend sur tout l’étage supérieur du Palais des Congrès International qui se situe sur Front Street. Cet univers de cloisons, d’éclairage aux spots, de pièces haut de gamme et de gommettes rouges crée une atmosphère somptueuse idéale pour personnes aisées en beaux habits. L’ambiance fait son petit effet. Les stands sont tenus par des galeries, magazines, écoles, associations, galeries artistiques émergentes, médias, galeries non lucratives et autres commanditaires.

 

Thomas Scoon. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Thomas Scoon.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

Greg Fidler. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Greg Fidler.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

J’ai retenu cinq galeries qui sortent du lot par leur présentation, leur qualité de travail et l’utilisation de matériaux 3D. La galerie Mike Weiss de New York présentait un stand rempli de sculptures métalliques réalisées par Kenney Mencher. La galerie Tezukayama du Japon présentait des œuvres cinétiques incroyables de Satoru Tamura. Studio 21 d’Halifax avait des œuvres du céramiste canadien Jason Holley ainsi que d’autres sculptures et pièces d’artisanat. La galerie Jones de Vancouver proposait un regroupement d’artistes travaillant divers matériaux en 2D et en 3D, tel que Bendan Tang. La seule galerie présentant du verre dans l’exposition était Sandra Ainsley.

 

Leah Wingfield and Steven Clements. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Leah Wingfield and Steven Clements.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

Il n’y avait étonnamment que peu d’œuvres en verre à voir, mis à part celles de Sandra Ainsley. Je pense que cela a joué en sa faveur, avec justesse d’ailleurs, car la collection de Sandra proposait Dante Marione, Irene Frolic, Thomas Scoon, Greg Fidler, Leah Wingfield et Steven Clements, Sabrina Knowles et Jenny Pohlman, et bien d’autres.

 

Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman. Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo. Size and year unknown. (photo credit:  Silvia Taylor)

Sabrina Knowles and Jenny Pohlman.
Picture taken from Sandra Ainsley’s booth at Art Toronto Expo.
Size and year unknown.
(photo credit: Silvia Taylor)

 

J’ai interviewé Jesse Bromm pour mieux comprendre le point de vue d’un artiste émergent qui expose dans un salon international. Jesse est en ce moment artiste résident au Harbourfront Center. Pendant l’exposition, le travail de Jesse était présenté par la galerie Neubacher Shor Contemporary.

 

Jesse Bromm. Landscape Series. (photo credit:  Jesse Bromm)

Jesse Bromm.
Landscape Series.
(photo credit: Jesse Bromm)

 

Comment as-tu pris contact avec la Neubacher Shor Contemporary ?

Je les avais rencontrés brièvement à l’occasion de The Artist Project, mais je me suis surtout lié d’amitié avec eux parce que la personne qui me fournit principalement en cartouches de chasse, est un bon ami de l’une des propriétaires, Manny (aussi rencontrée pendant The Artist Project).

 

Quel est ton sentiment sur l’exposition ?

C’était super. Tout s’est décidé un peu vite, mais c’était agréable de pouvoir simplement déposer mon travail sans avoir à tenir le stand. Même en déduisant la remise à la galerie, ça a été une de mes expositions les plus rentables financièrement.

 

Comment ça se passe avec la galerie NSC ?

Ils ont été très bien, accessibles et 1000 fois plus renseignés concernant la scène artistique de Toronto que moi. J’ai rencontré d’autres artistes, aussi représentés par eux, qui étaient très gentils et clairvoyants.

Considères-tu la présentation de ton travail dans ce genre d’exposition comme une possibilité d’avenir ? 

Je referais volontiers cette exposition. L’apport d’une galerie est incroyable. Si je voulais vendre plus de pièces haut de gamme, je pense que ce serait la meilleure façon.

 

 

Silvia Taylor est diplômée du programme Crafs and Design de Sheridan. Elle est actuellement artiste résidente à temps plein à l’atelier verrier du Harbourfront Center de Toronto. 

Share

Along These Lines: An Exhibition Review

By Julia Reimer

 

Katherine Russell is one of the most determined people I know. When she came and worked for us many years ago, she told me that her family nearly disowned her for going to art school and studying glass. I think this struggle strengthened her resolve and this resolve has served her well.

 

As you all know, having a career in glass is not an easy thing and we all need plenty of resolve, stubbornness and support. When I spoke with Katherine this past fall she would often ask how anyone could have a practice and a young child. Not having had this experience, I had no idea; but I often think that having a practice is hard enough and that it takes lots of time and money to put together a solo show.

 

I also saw Katherine come and rent our studio a few times and really use the production skills she has honed over the past few years to make her work. But she had to travel a few hours to get here and, with her son, her time in the shop was limited.

 

Arts Station Gallery view (2014), fused, coldworked & blown glass, various sizes (Terry Lys)

Arts Station Gallery view (2014), fused, coldworked & blown glass, various sizes (Terry Lys)

 

So having said all this, I don’t know why I was surprised when I went to her recent exhibition, “Along These Lines”, at the Fernie Arts Station.  It was a snowy, blowy night and I thought that because of the weather and the fact that Katherine doesn’t live in Fernie, there would only be a few people there and probably just a few pieces exhibited. Well the place was packed; full of friends and family from far way. Also, the walls and plinths were full of a diverse range of work.

 

Katherine lives in Elkford, B.C., which is a small mining town with a glass community of one. When she and her husband moved there, instead of packing in her glass career she set up a coldworking and kilnforming studio even though her practice to that point was based in the hotshop. The work on the walls of the gallery were evidence of that exploration of process and technique. There was a very diverse range of pieces:  wall panels, sculptural plinth work, and functional objects. There seemed to be a theme running through most of the work – strong graphic imagery representing landscape. This work was inspired by detailed photos of the Australian ground that was one of the ways she felted rooted in a place far from home when she lived and worked there a few years ago.

 

"Along These Lines" (2014), fused & coldworked glass, 35 x 35". (Terry Lys)

“Along These Lines” (2014), fused & coldworked glass, 35 x 35″. (Terry Lys)

 

Of the exhibited pieces, I felt really drawn to the some of the wall pieces which, although formed in a flat process, had a lot of texture and shape derived from deep coldworked cuts and thick layers of colour. What was nice about this was the pieces seemed less static – not just a flat image but more sculptural and less like a picture. I also really liked how the colour in the patterns created a texture and seemed to pull the shape and impact it. These intersections of colour and the pattern and texture they create were part of what Katherine was trying to achieve and I think this worked out well for the wall panels.

 

The blown work had some really strong graphic qualities as well, with some interesting intersections of graphic lines and colour. Looking at the wall work, I found myself wanting to see some of those same deep coldworked cuts in the blown work; to have the blown pieces be pulled about by the colour and to have the forms reflect this graphic imagery. The blown forms seemed a bit staid compared to the wall pieces. I think blown work can often fall into more defined shapes and ideas but ideally the design of it should have a strong connection and share elements with one of kind work.

 

"Void (detail)" (2013), fused & coldworked glass, 32 x 32". (Katherine Russell)

“Void (detail)” (2013), fused & coldworked glass, 32 x 32″. (Katherine Russell)

 

It was interesting talking with Katherine after the show about the development of this work, which in some ways is such a departure from her previous blown work. Although the connections to pattern are still there, the kilns have allowed her to change the scale and direction of the work. I got a real sense of Katherine’s excitement about working in kilns, about the possibilities of this technique, and the freedom of trying something unknown. Katherine, like many artists is doing something amazing; finding freedom and experimentation of what they don’t have instead of what they do.

 

 

Julia Reimer grew up and still lives in a small prairie town nestled in the foothills of southern Alberta. She completed her course work at ACAD in 2000 and now owns and operates Firebrand Glass Studio with her husband, Tyler Rock. Her aesthetic, based on the simplicity of light and form, is derived from the environment of crisp prairie light, gentle hills and windswept grasslands.

 

 

Critique de l’Exposition « Along These Lines »

Par Julia Reimer

 

Katherine Russell est l’une des personnes les plus déterminées que je connaisse. Lorsqu’elle est venue travailler avec nous il y a plusieurs années de ça, elle m’avait expliqué comment sa famille l’avait pratiquement déshéritée pour avoir voulu étudier le verre dans une école d’art. Cette difficulté a surement renforcé sa volonté et cela lui a rendu service.

 

Comme vous le savez tous, faire carrière dans le verre n’est pas chose facile et nous avons tous eu besoin de beaucoup de volonté, d’obstination et de soutien. En discutant avec Katherine à l’automne dernier, nous nous interrogions souvent sur comment parvenir à travailler tout en s’occupant d’un enfant en bas-âge. N’ayant pas été dans cette situation, je n’en savais rien, mais être verrier me parait déjà bien assez difficile et pouvoir présenter sa propre exposition demande beaucoup de temps et d’argent.

 

Katherine a aussi loué notre atelier plusieurs fois et je l’ai vu utiliser les compétences qu’elle avait acquises au cours des années précédentes pour y produire son travail. Mais elle devait faire plusieurs heures de route avec son fils pour s’y rendre, ce qui limitait son temps dans l’atelier.

 

Arts Station Gallery view (2014), fused, coldworked & blown glass, various sizes (Terry Lys)

Arts Station Gallery view (2014), fused, coldworked & blown glass, various sizes (Terry Lys)

 

Tout ceci étant dit, je me demande à présent comment j’ai pu être surprise lorsque je me suis rendue à sa dernière exposition « Along These Lines » au Fernie Arts Station. Le temps était neigeux et venteux et comme Katherine n’habitait pas Fernie, je m’attendais à voir quelques pièces et peu de monde. Eh bien la salle était comble, pleine d’amis et de membre de la famille venus de loin. De plus, les murs et les supports étaient remplis de toute une variété d’œuvres.

 

Katherine habite Elkford B.C., une petite ville minière où la communauté verrière se réduit à une seule personne. En s’installant dans cette ville avec son mari, et bien qu’elle n’ait qu’une expérience de travail à chaud,  Katherine s’est constitué un atelier de thermoformage et de travail à froid au lieu de ranger sa carrière au garage. Les pièces exposées aux murs montraient cette exploration des procédés et des techniques. Il y en avait une grande variété : panneaux muraux, sculptures sur socle et divers objets fonctionnels. À travers son travail, on pouvait discerner le thème récurrent du paysage par une imagerie graphique forte. Inspiré de photos détaillées du sol Australien, elle présente par ses œuvres son attachement pour cet endroit lointain où elle a habité et travaillé il y a plusieurs années.

 

"Along These Lines" (2014), fused & coldworked glass, 35 x 35". (Terry Lys)

“Along These Lines” (2014), fused & coldworked glass, 35 x 35″. (Terry Lys)

 

De toutes les pièces exposées, certaines pièces murales ont particulièrement attiré mon attention. Bien que réalisées à plat, elles présentaient beaucoup de texture et de formes provenant d’aspérités profondes réalisées à froid et de couches épaisses de couleurs. Les pièces n’avaient pas l’air statiques – elles avaient plus l’air de sculptures que d’images figées. J’ai aussi vraiment apprécié la façon dont la couleur produisait un relief et semblait souligner et influencer les formes. Le relief et la texture obtenus par ces jeux de couleur faisaient partie des intentions de Katherine et ses panneaux le retranscrivait très bien.

 

Son travail soufflé possédait également des qualités graphiques pertinentes et des jeux de courbes et de couleurs intéressants. En observant le travail mural, j’ai réalisé que je souhaitais retrouver ces mêmes aspérités à froid dans le travail de soufflage ; pour que les formes des pièces soufflées soient elles-aussi influencées par la couleur et reflètent cette même imagerie graphique. Les formes soufflées me semblaient un peu sages par rapport aux pièces murales. D’après moi, le verre soufflé prend souvent des formes et des idées plus définies, mais son design devrait toujours transmettre une impression forte et posséder des éléments retranscrivant la singularité du travail accompli.

 

"Void (detail)" (2013), fused & coldworked glass, 32 x 32". (Katherine Russell)

“Void (detail)” (2013), fused & coldworked glass, 32 x 32″. (Katherine Russell)

 

Après l’exposition, j’ai pu discuter avec Katherine et c’était très intéressant de comprendre la progression de son projet, qui par bien des aspects, était très différent de son précédent travail de soufflage. Bien qu’on retrouve les mêmes motifs, les fours lui ont apporté une nouvelle dimension pour varier l’orientation de son travail. J’ai ressenti un réel enthousiasme de la part de Katherine pour son projet avec les fours, les multiples possibilités de cette technique amenant la liberté d’essayer des choses inconnues. Comme beaucoup d’autres artistes, Katherine réalise quelque chose de fascinant : elle a trouvé la liberté d’expérimenter ce qu’elle ne connaît pas au lieu de faire ce qu’elle sait déjà.

 

Julia Reimer a grandi et vit encore dans une petite ville au pied des collines du sud de l’Alberta. Elle a obtenu son diplôme à l’ACAD en 2000 et possède maintenant avec son mari Tyler Rock, l’atelier Firebrand Glass Studio. Basé sur la simplicité de la lumière et des formes, son esthétisme puise sa source dans la lumière des prairies fraîches, des douces collines et des pâturages battus par le vent. 

Share

Chihuly in Montreal: A video based review

By Brad Copping

 

 

In the summer and fall of 2013, just down the street from Canada’s oldest commercial gallery specializing in Canadian art glass, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts hosted a major exhibition of American glass artist, Dale Chihuly, called Utterly Breathtaking.  The exhibition was a spectacular success for the museum with hundreds of thousands of viewers paying the $20 admission fee.  The exhibition has its own website where you can see a video and much more.  The museum has also launched a public campaign to raise enough funds to purchase the piece, which graced the streets of Montreal during the run of the exhibition.

The video in the link contains images from the exhibition as well as reviews by two visitors to the exhibition.  Steve Tippin, current President of the Glass Art Association of Canada, was very skeptical of Chihuly’s work.  Before the show, he thought that Chihuly lovers were simply uninformed of the other glass artists working within the glass scene but, as it turns out, perhaps Tippin dismissed Chihuly too easily.  Tippin has his BFA in Sculpture and Printmaking from the University of Guelph, went to Sheridan College for Glass, and then received his Masters in Glass from the Rochester Institute of Technology.  Susan Belyea, a former glass artist working under the moniker Glass Roots out of her own studio in Kingston, Ontario, is now a PhD candidate at Queens University.  On her visit to the exhibition, Belyea was accompanied by friends who knew nothing about glass, and she felt that this was a refreshing experience, which taught her something about seeing an art show.  The video footage and photographs were taken by Brad Copping in September of 2013.  The final video was produced in February of 2014.

The link to video is http://youtu.be/t3bU4DBMQvQ

Share

Blown Down Under and Back Again

By Steve Fassezke

 

Driving past the Skiwi crossing road sign (Skiing kiwi) heading towards the Tongariro National Park in winter.

Driving past the Skiwi crossing road sign (Skiing kiwi) heading towards the Tongariro National Park in winter.

 

Following a two-year educational hiatus, I knew I wanted to do something new, exciting and fresh with my life. The thing that I love the most about glass is that it is not confined to any one place or region, with studios and artists working in just about every corner of the world. Thirsty for something different, I began research into all the different glass schools that exist internationally. In the spring of 2007, following a quick web search, I located a glass school in a small town in New Zealand. I knew very little about the school or town before committing to it. The allure and attractiveness of New Zealand as a country hooked me. I watched enough Discovery Channel features while growing up to know what New Zealand has to offer. I applied to the Wanganui Glass School in Wanganui, New Zealand, in 2007.

 

Blowing glass at the Wanganui Glass School 2010 with fellow classmate George Agius assisting.

Blowing glass at the Wanganui Glass School 2010 with fellow classmate George Agius assisting.

 

I moved to Wanganui knowing very little. Being a shy boy from central Michigan, this was a major step towards something incredible. I found it hard, at the time, to separate my feelings of anxiety from my newfound excitement for the big move. Wanganui would turn out to be my home for almost 5 years. In 2011, I successfully completed the Diploma in Glass Design and Production from the Wanganui Glass School (UCOL).

 

Co-owners Katie Brown and Lyndsay Patterson standing in front of the Chronicle Glass Studio in Wanganui, New Zealand.

Co-owners Katie Brown and Lyndsay Patterson standing in front of the Chronicle Glass Studio in Wanganui, New Zealand.

 

A view looking down into the hot shop pit from the mezzanine of the Chronicle Glass Studio.

A view looking down into the hot shop pit from the mezzanine of the Chronicle Glass Studio.

 

After graduation, I stayed in Wanganui to work at the Chronicle Glass Studio, which is owned and operated by Lyndsay Patterson and Katie Brown. Katie and Lyndsay are both prominent glass artists whose work can be found throughout Australasia and the world. The day-to-day operations of the studio consist of production glasswork as well as work based on commissions. The most impressive commission that came through the studio in my time there was a glass contract for Peter Jacksons’ The Hobbit film trilogy.

 

Shooting location for the Hobbiton set exteriors for the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit trilogies, Matamata, New Zealand.

Shooting location for the Hobbiton set exteriors for the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit trilogies, Matamata, New Zealand.

 

With Lyndsay as the lead gaffer, I was on the team of five glassblowers who worked for over two years producing over 2,500 individual glass items for the trilogy. The Chronicle team hand-blew every piece seen on screen:  from Bilbo’s ink well, food jars, cups and vases to elfish goblets, wine bottles, lanterns and much more. It is definitely worth utilizing the pause button on your remote to spot them all.

 

The view looking north towards Mt. Ruapehu taken from the summit of Mt. Ngauruhoe (Mt. Doom) 1 1/2 hours drive north of Wanganui.

The view looking north towards Mt. Ruapehu taken from the summit of Mt. Ngauruhoe (Mt. Doom) 1 1/2 hours drive north of Wanganui.

 

I walked away from New Zealand with experiences that influence my work and life on a daily basis. I have carried these experiences into my ongoing work in Toronto, where I am currently a full time artist-in-residence at the Harbourfront Centre.  I met some amazing people in Wanganui, including my lovely fiancé. I can only say that taking a step outside your comfort zone is always worth the risks; you never know what you will find.

 

The Emerald Lakes, Tongariro National Park.

The Emerald Lakes, Tongariro National Park.

 

Hiking on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, Tongariro National Park.

Hiking on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, Tongariro National Park.

 

 

Steven’s fascination for glass started at an early age in his hometown of Saginaw, MI where he worked as a glazier and leadlighter. His interests then took him to New Zealand, where he graduated from the Wanganui Glass School in 2011 with a Diploma in Glass Design and Production. Steven’s work has several influences, including the dynamics of fluid motion and the living and non-living elements of the ocean.

 

 

 

Parti souffler en bas et revenu

Par Steve Fassezke

 

Driving past the Skiwi crossing road sign (Skiing kiwi) heading towards the Tongariro National Park in winter.

Driving past the Skiwi crossing road sign (Skiing kiwi) heading towards the Tongariro National Park in winter.

 

Après une pause de deux ans dans mes études, j’ai compris que je voulais vivre quelque chose de nouveau et de rafraichissant. Ce que j’aime plus que tout avec le verre, c’est que ce n’est pas limité à un seul endroit ou un pays, il y a des artistes et des ateliers partout dans le monde. J’avais soif d’aventures et j’ai commencé à me documenter sur toutes les différentes formations de verre qui existaient à travers le monde. Au printemps 2007, après une recherche rapide sur Internet, j’ai trouvé une école de verre dans une petite ville de Nouvelle-Zélande. J’en savais très peu sur l’école et la ville au moment de mon inscription. Les caractéristiques et l’attrait de la Nouvelle-Zélande ont suffi pour me convaincre. J’ai regardé suffisamment de documentaires dans ma jeunesse pour connaître les atouts de la Nouvelle-Zélande. En 2007, j’ai donc postulé à la Wanganui Glass School de Wanganui en Nouvelle-Zélande.

 

Blowing glass at the Wanganui Glass School 2010 with fellow classmate George Agius assisting.

Blowing glass at the Wanganui Glass School 2010 with fellow classmate George Agius assisting.

 

Je suis parti pour Wanganui avec très peu d’informations. Pour le timide garçon du Michigan que j’étais, c’était un énorme pas en avant. J’ai eu du mal à cette époque, à faire la différence entre l’anxiété et l’excitation de ce grand départ. Au final, Wanganui s’est révélé être ma terre d’accueil pour près de cinq années. En 2011, j’ai obtenu mon diplôme en Glass Design and Production de la Wanganui Glass School (UCOL).

 

Co-owners Katie Brown and Lyndsay Patterson standing in front of the Chronicle Glass Studio in Wanganui, New Zealand.

Co-owners Katie Brown and Lyndsay Patterson standing in front of the Chronicle Glass Studio in Wanganui, New Zealand.

 

A view looking down into the hot shop pit from the mezzanine of the Chronicle Glass Studio.

A view looking down into the hot shop pit from the mezzanine of the Chronicle Glass Studio.

 

Après l’obtention de mon diplôme, je suis resté à Wanganui pour travailler au Chronicle Glass Studio, qui appartient et est régi par Lyndsay Patterson et Katie Brown. Katie et Lyndsay sont toutes les deux des artistes reconnues et leur travail est exposé en Océanie et dans le monde entier. Au quotidien, le travail à l’atelier consistait à produire des objets en verre et réaliser des commandes. Durant mon temps à l’atelier, la commande la plus impressionnante que j’ai pu voir était un contrat  pour la trilogie du film « The Hobbit » de Peter Jackson.

 

Shooting location for the Hobbiton set exteriors for the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit trilogies, Matamata, New Zealand.

Shooting location for the Hobbiton set exteriors for the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit trilogies, Matamata, New Zealand.

 

Sous les ordres de Lyndsay, notre équipe de cinq souffleurs de verre dont moi, a travaillé pendant deux ans pour produire plus de 2 500 pièces de verre pour la trilogie. L’équipe du Chronicle a soufflé manuellement chaque pièce vue au cinéma : de l’encrier de Bilbo à ses bocaux de conserves, ses tasses, vases, gobelets d’elfes, bouteilles de vin, lanternes et bien plus encore. Faites pause sur votre télécommande pour tous les repérer, vous verrez ça vaut le détour.

 

The view looking north towards Mt. Ruapehu taken from the summit of Mt. Ngauruhoe (Mt. Doom) 1 1/2 hours drive north of Wanganui.

The view looking north towards Mt. Ruapehu taken from the summit of Mt. Ngauruhoe (Mt. Doom) 1 1/2 hours drive north of Wanganui.

 

Une fois rentré de Nouvelle-Zélande, cette expérience a influencé mon travail et ma vie de tous les jours. Je l’ai mis à profit dans mon travail actuel à Toronto, où je suis à présent artiste résident à temps plein au Harbourfront Centre. J’ai rencontré des gens formidables à Wanganui, dont mon adorable fiancée. Je ne peux que vous recommander de mettre un pied en dehors de votre zone de confort, ça vaut toujours le coup car vous ne savez jamais ce que vous y trouverez.

 

The Emerald Lakes, Tongariro National Park.

The Emerald Lakes, Tongariro National Park.

 

Hiking on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, Tongariro National Park.

Hiking on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, Tongariro National Park.

 

 

La fascination de Steven pour le verre a commencé tôt dans sa ville d’origine à Saginaw, MI, où il a travaillé en tant que vitrier et vitrailliste. Cet intérêt l’emmena ensuite en Nouvelle-Zélande, où il obtint un diplôme en Glass Design and Production de la Wanganui Glass School en 2011. Le travail de Steven est influencé par diverses choses, dont la dynamique des mouvements fluides, et les éléments vivants ou  non-vivants de l’océan.

Share
//