President’s Message

June 15, 2014

Congratulations Grads in Canada and abroad!

by Steven Tippin

 

My favourite issue has finally arrived and, man alive, I am excited! It is finally the Contemporary Canadian Glass magazine’s education issue. This is the issue where we brag about the great stuff happening in the world of education, both in Canada and abroad. My favourite part has always been the feature on the graduates from the Alberta College of Art + Design, Sheridan College, and Espace Verre, so please take some time and read them and – not to toot our own Glass Art Association of Canada horn – but the whole issue is pretty great, so why not read it all?

 

Why is the education issue always my favourite? Even before I myself was featured as a graduate from Sheridan College, I have always enjoyed the Canadian graduate feature. It allows GAAC to highlight the newest directions in glass and the best that the schools have to offer. Needless to say, the work is inspiring, raw, and fresh.

 

Allow me to congratulate our graduating students, both here in Canada and abroad. Your countless hours working in the studio have finally paid off and now we the readers get to see what you have been working on while spending months locked up in a studio. I was lucky enough to do a residency at Sheridan College and, because of this, I know half of the graduates in Canada. This makes my first education issue as president especially, uh, special. It also means that I was able to watch many of these students grow in their second and third years and see the glimmers of excitement and brilliance.

 

So join me, GAAC members, in seeing what the Grads have to show us. Remember their names because they are the future of Canadian glass art.

 

 

Félicitations aux nouveaux diplômés au Canada et à l’étranger!

par Steve Tippin

 

Mon édition préférée est enfin arrivée et j’en suis tout excité! Enfin, c’est l’heure du numéro de notre magazine  Contemporary Canadian Glass spécial Education. C’est celui où nous parlons de toutes les belles choses qui se font dans le milieu de l’enseignement, à la fois au Canada et à l’étranger. Ma partie préférée a toujours été l’édition spéciale dédiée  aux diplômés de l’Alberta College of Art + Design, du Sheridan College, et de l’Espace Verre, alors prenez un moment pour les lire et – sans vouloir nous vanter- la totalité de l’édition est vraiment bien, autant la lire en entier !

 

Pourquoi le numéro sur l’éducation est-il toujours celui que je préfère ? Avant même d’avoir pu en bénéficier en tant que diplômé du Sheridan College, j’ai toujours apprécié la page réservée aux diplômés canadiens. Cela permet au GAAC de valoriser les dernières tendances du verre et aux écoles de nous présenter le meilleur de ce qu’elles ont. Inutile de préciser que le travail présenté y est frais et stimulant.

 

Permettez-moi de féliciter nos étudiants diplômés, à la fois au Canada et au-delà de nos frontières. Vos nombreuses heures de travail en atelier paient enfin, et nous lecteurs, pouvons à présent découvrir ce sur quoi vous avez travaillé depuis des mois au fond de vos ateliers. J’ai eu la chance d’effectuer une résidence au Sheridan College et grâce à cela, je connais la moitié des diplômés canadiens. Ce qui rend ma première édition sur l’éducation d’autant plus spéciale. Cela signifie aussi que j’ai pu observer la plupart de ces étudiants progresser durant leur deuxième et troisième année, et remarquer les étincelles de créativité et d’exhortation dans leurs yeux.

 

Ainsi, chers membres du GAAC, voyez ce que nos diplômés ont à nous présenter. Souvenez-vous de leurs noms car ils représentent l’avenir de l’art du verre du Canada.

Share

Canadian Glass School Comparison

by Katrina Brodie

 

 

For this year’s education issue we interviewed representatives at the three Canadian schools with glass programs so that our readers can compare and contrast them.   Answering our questions were:  from the Alberta College of Art + Design (ACAD), Natali Rodrigues; from Sheridan College (SC), Koen Vanderstukken; and from Espace Verre (EV), Christian Poulin.

 

 

Espace Verre Studio

Espace Verre Studio

 

Sheridan Studio

Sheridan Studio

 

 

Q1: What is the duration of your glass program?

 

ACAD: Four years for a BFA, twenty months for an MFA (first applicants begin in 2015).

 

SC: Four years.

 

EV: Three years.

 

Q2: What accreditation is awarded to graduates?

 

ACAD: Bachelor of Fine Arts.

 

SC: Bachelor of Craft and Design.

 

EV: Graduates receive a College Studies Diploma (DEC) (between High School and University).

 

Q3: How many students are admitted yearly?

 

ACAD: Twelve to the major.

 

SC: Up to about twenty students.

 

EV: We can have up to fifteen students in first year.

 

Q4: Typically, how many students graduate?

 

ACAD: Ten to twelve.

 

SC: Could be anywhere from five to twenty, usually ten to fifteen.

 

EV: It’s always different, but usually it’s between six and ten graduates. This year there will be only two graduates because some of the students have dropped out and some have prolonged their program to more than three years.

 

Q5: Which disciplines of glass can students practice at your school?

 

ACAD: Various hot glass processes (blowing, casting, sculpting), cold forming (cold working, lamination, etc.), kiln forming (casting, fusing, slumping, pate de verre, etc.).

 

SC: Glass blowing, hot sculpting, sand casting, flame working, kiln casting, pâte-de-verre, slumping, fusing, laminating, engraving, sand blasting, cold working, electroplating, etc.

 

EV: We have all the facilities for blowing, kiln- and sand-castings, fusing, cold working, flame working, neon, painting on glass, molding, and drawing. The students have courses in all of these disciplines. Also, in the second and third year courses, they have the opportunity of combining more than one discipline. Apart from glass techniques, they have courses at the college in accounting, creativity, marketing, art and glass history, French grammar, and philosophy.

 

Q6: What is the mission of this program?

 

ACAD: The glass program is dedicated to the development of an inclusive environment, which fosters students who are creative, independent makers, and critical thinkers. We embrace the ideals inherent in creative production, on-going experimentation, research, and critical investigation.

 

SC: Innovation in craft, design and art practice.

 

EV: We’re a technical fine craft program, so we offer students the possibility to develop and create small series (functional and decorative) and one of a kind pieces (sculptural and exploration oriented). The students can work on both types of creations in order to reach different markets.

 

Q7: Who started the program, and in what year?

 

ACAD: Norman Faulkner, who opened the hot shop in 1975.  Casting began in 1983.

 

SC: Robert Held started the program in 1969.

 

EV: The program was started in 1989 by the school cofounders François Houdé and Ronald Labelle, with the support of a faculty of glass artists including Susan Edgerley, Élisabeth Marier, Donald Robertson, Michèle Lapointe, Laura Donefer, Michel Vincent, and many more. After many years, some of the graduates of the program have replaced instructors who have left to focus time on their own careers or fulfil other obligations in their lives. A new generation of glass artists are now teaching with the help of more experienced instructors. Since the first graduation of 1992, we have had 149 graduates. Almost half of them are still active in the glass community.

 

Q8: What makes your program different from others?

 

ACAD: The glass curriculum is team-taught through a collaborative approach to instruction. At points in the curriculum, teaching and learning involves the integration of majors at all levels for workshop-style input and critical dialogue. Student learning, creative production, and inquiry are carried out in an environment predicated on involvement, outreach and integration.

 

SC: As makers and designers, we use materials and ideas to transform environmental and human potential. Our ground-breaking curriculum, which offers industrial design alongside the classic studios of ceramics, furniture, glass and textiles, encourages students to integrate design thinking and hands-on experience.

Regardless of their area of concentration, students are involved in interdisciplinary projects and in the creation of diverse objects and experiences. They are exposed to a range of working methodologies and models of practice. These will include independent studio and contemporary art practice, the creation of objects and prototypes for industry, as well as entrepreneurial and/or e-commerce business.

Critical and conceptual abilities developed through individual and group critiques are a vital aspect of the learning experience. Supporting courses in areas like drawing, design, cultural studies, and digital technology, as well as business and professional practices, will prepare students for their career. Cooperative internships in relevant fields are tailored to individual needs.

In Sheridan’s Craft and Design degree program, students turn ideas into products, knowledge into substance, and passion into a career.

 

Sheridan College

Sheridan College

 

 

EV: First, ours is the only program offered in French in Canada, and we’re the only school of its kind in the province of Québec. We also cover a very large number of glass disciplines and encourage the students to combine them to create original pieces. The program also includes courses that help the graduate to build up their career, marketing and studios. After the program, graduates can apply to participate in the Fusion Studio, which gives them a maximum two-year access to a hot studio and a mentor at a lower cost in order to build up their products and market. Since the beginning of the Fusion Studio in 1993, seventy-four graduates have had this opportunity and forty-four of those are still active in the glass community.

 

 

Espace Verre Studio

Espace Verre Studio

 

 

 

Comparatif des Ecoles de Verre au Canada

par Katrina Brodie

 

 

Cette année pour notre article sur le thème de l’éducation, nous avons interrogé des représentants des trois écoles canadiennes qui proposent un programme verre, afin que nos lecteurs puissent les comparer.

Répondant à nos questions: Natali Rodrigues de l’Alberta College of Art + Design (ACAD); Koen Vanderstukken du Sheridan College (SC) et Christian Poulin de l’Espace Verre (EV).

 

 

Espace Verre Studio

Espace Verre Studio

 

Sheridan Studio

Sheridan Studio

 

 

Q1: Quelle est la durée du programme?

 

ACAD: Quatre années pour un BFA et vingt mois pour un MFA (les premiers candidats débuteront en 2015).

 

SC: Quatre ans.

 

EV: C’est un programme de trois ans.

 

Q2: Quel diplôme reçoit le finissant?

 

ACAD: Un Diplôme bachelor des beaux-arts

 

SC: Un Diplôme bachelor en arts et design

 

EV: Le finissant reçoit un Diplôme d’études collégiales (DEC).

Sheridan:

 

Q3: Combien d’étudiants peuvent être acceptés dans ce programme?

 

ACAD: Douze pour le major.

 

SC: Jusqu’à une vingtaine d’étudiants.

 

EV: Nous pouvons accepter jusqu’à 15 étudiants en première année.

 

Q4: Habituellement, combien de finissants complètent le programme?

 

ACAD: Entre dix et douze.

 

SC: Cela peut varier de cinq à vingt, en général entre dix et quinze.

 

EV: Nous avons en moyenne entre 6 et 10 finissants. Toutefois, cette année nous aurons deux finissants car plusieurs ont quitté ou font le programme en plus de trois ans.

 

Q5: Quelles techniques du verre les étudiants peuvent apprendre à votre école ?

 

ACAD: Différents procédés à chaud (soufflage, coulage dans des moules, sculpture), verre à froid (feuilletage, etc.), thermoformage (fusing, moulage, pâte de verre, etc.)

 

SC: Soufflage, sculpture à chaud, coulage au sable, travail au chalumeau, pâte de verre, thermoformage, fusing, feuilletage, gravure, sablage, travail à froid, plaques électriques, etc.

 

EV: Nous avons les installations pour enseigner toutes les techniques : soufflage, coulage (dans des moules et dans le sable), thermoformage, verre à froid, chalumeau et néon, peinture sur verre, moulage et dessin. En plus des cours de spécialisation, les étudiants ont des cours au collège de comptabilité, créativité, marketing, histoire de l’art et du verre, français et philosophie.

 

Q6: Quelle est l’orientation de votre programme?

 

ACAD: Le programme verre se concentre sur le développement d’un environnement spécifique, qui accompagne les étudiants créatifs, autonomes et dotés d’un esprit critique. Nous mettons en avant les principes inhérents à la créativité, l’expérimentation constante, la recherche et l’approfondissement critique.

 

SC: Innovation dans l’art, design et pratique de l’art.

 

EV: Nous sommes dans un programme de Techniques de métiers d’art. Les étudiants ont la possibilité de développer des créations de petites séries (fonctionnelles ou décoratives) et aussi des pièces uniques (sculpture et d’expression. Les étudiants peuvent travailler dans les deux orientations afin d’élargir les différentes niches de marché.

 

Q7: Qui a fondé votre programme et quand?

 

ACAD: Norman Faulkner, qui créa l’atelier en 1975.  Le moulage commença en 1983.

 

SC: Robert Held lanca le programme en 1969.

 

EV: Le programme a débuté en 1989 et les deux fondateurs de l’école François Houdé et Ronald Labelle se sont adjoints au cours des années plusieurs verriers dont Susan Edgerley, Élisabeth Marier, Donald Robertson, Michèle Lapointe, Laura Donefer, Michel Vincent et de nombreux autres. Depuis quelques années des finissants du programme prennent la relève de certains professeurs qui quittent l’enseignement pour se concentrer sur leur carrière ou pour d’autres raisons personnelles. Une nouvelle génération de verriers s’initie à l’enseignement avec la collaboration de professeurs plus expérimentés. Depuis la première cohorte de finissants en 1992, nous avons eu 149 finissants dont près de la moitié sont toujours actifs dans le domaine du verre.

 

Q8: Qu’est-ce qui distingue votre programme des autres? 

 

ACAD: Le programme verre se base sur une approche collaborative au travers un enseignement d’équipe. A certains moments du cursus, l’enseignement et l’apprentissage se font par la participation à des modules de différents niveaux pour un apport pratique en atelier et un dialogue critique. L’apprentissage, la création et les recherches sont menés dans un environnement fondé sur l’implication, le dépassement et l’intégration.

 

SC: En tant que créateurs et designers, nous utilisons des matières et des idées qui transforment le potentiel humain et environnemental. Notre cursus de base, où le design industriel côtoie les ateliers classiques de céramique, d’ébénisterie, de verre et textiles, encourage les étudiants à intégrer à leur réflexion design et expérience manuelle.

Indépendamment de leur matière principale, les étudiants sont sollicités pour des projets interdisciplinaires et  la réalisation de différents projets et expérimentations. Ils sont exposés à une variété de méthodes de travail et de modèles. Cela comprend des ateliers indépendants et la pratique d’arts contemporains, la réalisation d’objets et de prototypes destinés à l’industrie, ainsi que des cours d’entreprenariat et d’e-commerce.

Les capacités de critique et de conceptualisation qui se développent à travers les exercices en groupe et individuels constituent un aspect vital de l’apprentissage. En suivant des cours tels que le dessin, le design, les études culturelles et les technologies digitales, ainsi par des méthodes de commerce professionnelles, les étudiants sont préparés pour leur carrière. Des stages coopératifs dans les domaines concernés sont prévus sur mesure. .

Dans le programme Craft and Design de Sheridan, les étudiants transforment leurs idées en objets, leurs connaissances en substance, et leur passion en carrière.

 

Sheridan College

Sheridan College

 

 

EV: Premièrement, il s’agit du seul programme de verre en français au Canada et nous sommes la seule école dans cette discipline au Québec. De plus, nous enseignons de nombreuses techniques et encourageons les étudiants à combiner ces techniques pour créer des œuvres originales. Le programme comprend aussi des cours de gestion de carrière, d’atelier et de mise en marché. Après le programme, des finissants peuvent être choisis pour participer à l’atelier Fusion qui donne accès à un atelier de verre à chaud, à un taux préférentiel, durant un maximum de deux ans avec l’aide d’une mentor pour démarrer leur carrière et développer leurs produits. Depuis les débuts de l’atelier Fusion en 1993, 74 finissants ont eu ce privilège et 44 sont encore actifs dans le domaine du verre.

 

 

Espace Verre Studio

Espace Verre Studio

 

 

Share

SiO2 : Armel Desrues and Marc-André Fontaine Leave Their Mark on Glass

by Valérie Paquin

 

 

From June 5 to September 5, 2014, Espace VERRE’s gallery presents SiO2,an exhibition showcasing the cumulative works of Armel Desrues and Marc-André Fontaine. The pair forms the 2014 graduating class of the Fine Craft – Glass Option program, offered in collaboration with the Cégep du Vieux Montréal.

After several years of traditional glassblowing apprenticeship in France, Armel Desrues came to Quebec with the desire to delve deeper into the realm of concept and design. During his time at Espace VERRE, he has learned to benefit from the North American approach, where glass is used in more sculptural and experimental ways. Fascinated by the actual process of transforming our favourite material, he explores the plasticity of molten glass to create forms that retain traces of their mutations.

Armel’s hybrid sculptures coexist between reality and fiction, while rebuffing classical references. His anthropomorphic work is the result of research on the correlation between our environment and the history of glass. Further, we get a sense that his creations have an evident penchant for contemporary design, as demonstrated by the organic forms of his production. Pendant lights and perfume bottles were both created by letting the subsequent hot glass gathers dictate the shape of the object.

 

 

Desrues, Armel. Artefact no1 (detail) (2014), blown, hot-sculpted and sandblasted glass, neon (Michel Dubreuil)

Desrues, Armel. Artefact no1 (detail) (2014), blown, hot-sculpted and sandblasted glass, neon (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Desrues, Armel. Perfume bottles, blown glass (Michel Dubreuil)

Desrues, Armel. Perfume bottles, blown glass (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

In parallel, Marc-André Fontaine has the utmost respect for the craftsmanship of artisans throughout history. His pieces explore the link between the passing of time and the rituals that mark our existence. He has a wide range of inspirations, including the vestiges of the Vikings, the work of glass artist Bertil Vallien, and the satiric humor of graffiti artist Banksy. While forming new links between tradition and contemporary art, Marc-André delivers a playful testimony of his own life while paying homage to the sea and its navigators, and making references to the popular culture of his generation.

 

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Buoys, blown glass, braided rope (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Buoys, blown glass, braided rope (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Marc-André’s works unite the strength of a delicate subject with comical musing. While connected to the collective memory, the pieces reconfigure his own personal rites of passage. The young artist’s tongue-in-cheek reference to the human condition of our era generates smirks all around.

 

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (detail) (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (detail) (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

What does the future hold for these two promising artists? Only time will tell. Armel is hoping to join Espace VERRE’s transitional workshop, Fusion, next fall. However, he is also considering applying as studio assistant for North Lands Creative Glass in Scotland, or pursuing a Masters at the University of Sunderland’s National Glass Centre. Marc-André means to continue working as technician for Espace VERRE while starting up his own neon shop in Montreal with a fellow graduate, and establishing his career as an emerging glass artist.

SiO2 will be shown at the Espace VERRE Gallery through September 5, 2014. The glass art centre, located at 1200 Mill Street in Montreal, Quebec, is open from Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm, as well as the last Sunday of every month from noon to 5 pm. Admission is free of charge.

 

 

Left: Marc-André Fontaine, right: Armel Desrues (Espace VERRE + Marilyn Faucher)

Left: Marc-André Fontaine, right: Armel Desrues (Espace VERRE + Marilyn Faucher)

 

 

 

SiO2 | ARMEL DESRUES + MARC-ANDRÉ FONTAINE LAISSENT LEURS MARQUES SUR LE VERRE

par Valérie Paquin

 

 

Du 5 juin au 5 septembre, la galerie Espace VERRE présente le travail des deux finissants de la promotion 2014, Armel Desrues et Marc-André Fontaine. L’exposition SiO2 est le point culminant de leur formation collégiale en métiers d’art – option verre, offerte en collaboration avec le cégep du Vieux Montréal.

Issu d’un apprentissage du verre soufflé traditionnel en France, Armel Desrues  arrive au Québec avec une soif d’approfondir les stades de la conception et du design. Durant ses années d’exploration à Espace VERRE, il apprend à tirer bénéfice de l’approche nord-américaine, avec laquelle le verre est perçu d’une manière beaucoup plus sculpturale et expérimentale. Fasciné par le processus même de transformation de la matière, il exploite la plasticité du verre en fusion pour générer des formes en conservant les traces de sa mutation.

 

Les sculptures hybrides d’Armel, à mi-chemin entre le réel et la fiction, se détournent des modèles classiques. Ses œuvres anthropomorphiques sont le résultat d’une étude ayant pour but d’établir une relation entre notre environnement et l’histoire du verre.

 

 

Desrues, Armel. Artefact no1 (detail) (2014), blown, hot-sculpted and sandblasted glass, neon (Michel Dubreuil)

Desrues, Armel. Artefact no1 (detail) (2014), blown, hot-sculpted and sandblasted glass, neon (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

D’autant plus, on sent dans ses créations un penchant évident pour le design actuel, traduit par les formes organiques de sa production. Ses luminaires et flacons de parfum sont nés d’une volonté de laisser la succession de cueillettes de verre définir les lignes de l’objet.

 

 

Desrues, Armel. Perfume bottles, blown glass (Michel Dubreuil)

Desrues, Armel. Perfume bottles, blown glass (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

Parallèlement, Marc-André Fontaine témoigne d’un grand respect pour les artisans à travers les âges. Son travail explore la relation entre le temps qui passe et les rituels qui marquent notre existence. Avec des inspirations aussi diversifiées que les vestiges vikings, l’artiste verrier Bertil Vallien et l’humour satirique du graffiteur Banksy, il crée de nouveaux liens entre la tradition et l’art actuel. Avec SiO2, Marc-André nous livre un testament ludique de son vécu, avec autant d’hommages à la mer et aux navigateurs, qu’aux références pop de sa génération.

 

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Buoys, blown glass, braided rope (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Buoys, blown glass, braided rope (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

Les œuvres de Marc-André allient la force d’un propos sensible à une idée amusante, rattachée à la mémoire collective.

 

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (detail) (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (detail) (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

Ses pièces, qui se veulent une reconfiguration de ses propres rites de passage, laisseront leur public avec un indice sur la condition humaine à notre époque, ainsi qu’un petit sourire en coin.

Que réserve l’avenir pour ces deux artistes prometteurs? Seul le temps nous le dira. Armel espère se joindre à Fusion, l’atelier de transition d’Espace VERRE, à l’automne prochain. Toutefois, il considère aussi postuler pour un poste d’assistant d’atelier pour le North Lands Creative Glass en Écosse, ou encore s’inscrire à la maîtrise au National Glass Centre de l’université de Sunderland. Quant à Marc-André, il compte continuer à travailler comme technicien à Espace VERRE, tout en démarrant son propre atelier de néon à Montréal ainsi que sa carrière professionnelle de verrier de la relève.

SiO2 se poursuit à la galerie Espace VERRE jusqu’au 5 septembre 2014. Le centre de formation, de création et de diffusion des arts verriers est situé au 1200, rue Mill à Montréal. La galerie est ouverte du lundi au vendredi de 9 h à 17 h, ainsi que le dernier dimanche de chaque mois de 12 h à 17 h. L’entrée est gratuite.

 

 

Left: Marc-André Fontaine, right: Armel Desrues (Espace VERRE + Marilyn Faucher)

Left: Marc-André Fontaine, right: Armel Desrues (Espace VERRE + Marilyn Faucher)

 

 

Share

Another Group of Grads Says Goodbye to Sheridan


by Becky Lauzon

 

Chicago trip 2013. Left to right Koen Vanderstukken, Ron Vincent, Rob Raeside, Megan Smith, Rommy Rodriquez, Shay Salehi, Becky Lauzon, Gabriela Wilson.

Chicago trip 2013. Left to right Koen Vanderstukken, Ron Vincent, Rob Raeside, Megan Smith, Rommy Rodriquez, Shay Salehi, Becky Lauzon, Gabriela Wilson.

 

It seems like yesterday that we were all sitting in the first year room at the back of the glass studio making small talk and attempting to get to know each other.  Now fast-forward three years and here I am forced to say goodbye to some of the most unique and amazing people who have since become my dysfunctional yet lovable family.

 

Apart from the forced holidays (summer and Christmas break) myself, Becky Lauzon, Rob Raeside, Shay Salehi, Gabriela Wilson, and Ron Vincent have done just about everything together.  We’ve gone to classes, we’ve eaten, we’ve created, and we’ve travelled together.  For instance, this past November, Koen Vanderstukken, Romy Rodriquez, Megan Smith (a returning graduate), myself, and my fellow classmates all crammed ourselves into a van and headed off to Chicago’s S.O.F.A together.  We spent our time exploring the city and building friendships on the dance floor of a locale blues bar, while forming bonds that will continue for years to come.  We weren’t a group that could ever be described as quiet.  You could always be certain to find one, if not all of us, blaring our music, working in our preferred areas within the studio.  If not in the studio, then you could find us working away in AA19 (our designated classroom) debating topics such as whether a machine that produces literal shit should be considered art or discussing one of our latest creative ideas with each other.  We were finding connections and inspirations through each other’s work and discussions, even though, throughout our three years at Sheridan, we all managed to find different ways to work with glass be that blowing, kiln casting, flameworking, engraving, or even spray painting.

 

As Sheridan prepares this September to welcome the first group of students into its new Bachelor of Arts program, it is also saying goodbye to a group of graduates leaving the school to head off on their own adventures.  As we begin opening up our own studios and/or moving on to new ones, or staying around for another year to help out the next batch of hopeful glass artists, you can be certain that the memories and friendships won’t be forgotten.

 

 

Lauzon, Becky. Lost Bowls (2014).

Lauzon, Becky. Lost Bowls (2014).

 

Becky Lauzon grew up in Cochrane, a small town in Northern Ontario.  Upon graduating high school, Becky attended Haliburton School of the Arts where she studied Artist Blacksmithing and Glassblowing, and received a diploma for Visual and Creative Arts.  From there, she continued her studies in glassblowing at Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario. Currently, in her graduating year at Sheridan, Becky’s work deals with the conflict between urban and rural landscapes.  She uses mixed media and glass components to look into the continuous growth of the fast moving life of the city versus the slower pace and quiet of growing up in Northern Ontario.  Upon graduating, Becky plans to continue her exploration with glass and mixed media as a resident at Harbourfront Center in Toronto, Ontario.

 

 

Raeside, Rob. Bottle Caps (2014).

Raeside, Rob. Bottle Caps (2014).

 

Rob Raeside is a glass object maker who has been working with the medium for six years.  He has studied both at Sir Sanford Fleming College and Sheridan College.  In his second year of studies at Sheridan, he received the Silent Night award.  His dedication to the material has allowed him to work for Canadian glass artists such as Andy Kuntz, Paula Vandermey, Sally McCubbin, and Maciej Dyszkiewicz.  He has an upcoming full time job working for Alexi and Mariel Hunter.  Rob’s work is driven by the inherent complexities of what appears to be simple, and the constant desire to refine his technique.

 

 

Salehi, Shay. Organic: Brown (2014).

Salehi, Shay. Organic: Brown (2014).

 

When Shay Salehi was finishing high school, she had a desire to face new challenges by choosing to work with a medium she had no experience with:  glass.  After a couple years of exploring glass and discovering different processes of working with it, Shay began to find comfort in particular methods such as kiln casting and the pate de verre technique.  She enjoys the fragility of glass and its ability to mimic other materials.

Shay’s current body of work studies these qualities using line, shape, colour and texture formed by the pate de verre technique.  She fuses glass beads into pure and simple forms, which play with negative space and texture.  The lips on her bowls are rough, uncontrolled, and extremely fragile.  These bowls do not display the well-known properties of glass such as its transparency or optics; therefore, at first glance, one might not even consider these bowls as glass.

Shay recently graduated Sheridan College and received the Glass Art Association of Canada Project Grant. She is currently working on the development of her studio space.

 

 

Vincent, Ron. Scatterbot and Playtime (2014).

Vincent, Ron. Scatterbot and Playtime (2014).

 

Years ago, Ron Vincent pulled the plug on his engineering-oriented career path in order to pursue his creative efforts.  Unable to ignore his childhood passions of drawing, building, and storytelling, stagnant office environments disagreed with Ron’s inclinations.  He needed a more personal platform on which to let his ideas manifest.  Years spent accompanying his partner to Sheridan College’s ceramics studio led to inevitable exposure to the glass shop, sparking an interest that has grown into a passion.

 

The values instilled at early age through interaction with toys, comics, books, film, television, and video games are themes that fuel the projector in Ron’s mind. As developments occur in design-based technology, so does the integration with Ron’s methods of making and the passion he has for his work.  In this, Ron believes that he is closer to finding that happy middle ground for his inner child and the Ron that faces the big, scary world.

 

 

Wilson, Gabriela. Meniscus (2014).

Wilson, Gabriela. Meniscus (2014).

 

Gabriela Wilson is a Toronto-based artist, currently in her third year in the Craft and Design program at Sheridan College, with a major in glass blowing and a minor in kiln cast glass.  After working in the jewelry industry for several years, Gabriela returned to school to study glass arts in order to learn how to incorporate her two favorite materials, glass and metal.  To her delight, she has found that many aspects of her past studies in jewelry and gemology translate well into her new medium of glass.  Some of her focus has been spent on developing techniques to incorporate metals and glass in a hot state, producing a strong molecular bond. While still enjoying the different areas of the glass studio, her focus on her third and final year of study at Sheridan, so far, has been strongly on sculptural kiln cast objects. Gabriela’s work is influenced by the beauty and elegance of nature, sometimes with an added touch of dark humor or a personal narrative.  Her choice of materials gives her a perfect way to express her concepts.

 

 

Share

A Short History Of Mug Night

by Graeme Dearden

 

 

The idea is simple. Glass students create mugs and then provide beer to fill them. Other glass studios and similarly focused post-secondary programs have out-and-out sales of glassware to raise funds, but the glass department of The Alberta College Of Art + Design (ACAD) approaches this idea differently. Through the expansion of the standard glass sale into a raucous party and concert, ACAD’s annual Mug Night has become integral to the department’s communal growth. As the tradition closes its third decade, the event continues to sew the college’s glass department together through student coordination and glass-making.

 

Before being called Mug Night, the department had events of a similar structure. The first of these events was The Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Pub, which happened in the mid-eighties. It was one of the first “glass smashes” held by the department. Set to the music of a touring Toronto band, The Shuffle Demons, the main event was drinking from glassware made by students and then tossing the glass from a third-floor interior window onto the ground of the first-floor sculpture hallway.

 

After these, there came the beach parties of the late eighties. These involved covering the ground of the glassblowing studio in piles of sand and beach-themed props, then relaxing in the heat of the glory hole sun. Students brought kegs and everyone enjoyed drinking from hand-blown mugs.

 

In the early nineties, due to tightened safety regulations, these events were put to an end. The school administration seemed to take issue with groups of drunk people breaking glass and hanging out in front of open high-temperature furnaces. From then on, it became a rule that students couldn’t have alcohol outside of designated events in the school’s main mall or cafeteria.

 

This is when Mug Night started to occur. In the current day, it is set in the school cafeteria with long tables of glassware and food for sale. A rolling bar is parked at the end of the tables, where party-goers can go to fill their glasses with beer and sit down to enjoy each other’s company. Later in the night, local bands take the stage, whipping people into dancing between the cafeteria tables. All of this continues into the night, after which glass students clean up the aftermath.

 

 

Lucas Hrubizna,The Prabes Concert Poster for 2012 Mug Night (credit:  Chris Jones)

Lucas Hrubizna,The Prabes Concert Poster for 2012 Mug Night (credit: Chris Jones)

 

 

As a compliment to events past, Mug Night stays true to form as an expression of the kind of community glassworkers can foster. Intense sessions of pre-event glass making by students, and sometimes local artists, create a unique atmosphere where everyone gets a chance to collectively create for a common purpose. It’s a break from the ordinary classroom environment and teaches students about glassmaking from a different angle than they might experience in production of their personal bodies of work. As a result, numerous types of glassware are donated by students, faculty, visiting artists, and/or alumni, ranging anywhere from fifteen dollar cups to the big ticket items raffled off during the night.

 

Ultimately though, the most consistent aspect of Mug Night is that it continues to be student-run. Each year’s event teaches students about the practical aspects of event coordination such as planning and budgeting, but it’s also a testament to the history of the studio glass community. It’s structured around the indispensable strategy of community involvement, where everyone takes some level of personal responsibility for the financial and social well-being of the people working around them. One of the hopes of the ACAD Glass Department is that the handful of graduates who walk across the stage each year come with an understanding of how important were the bonds they made at school. These personal relationships, enforced by communal responsibility, carry them forward intellectually, professionally, and joyfully. The years shared among ACAD’s current group of graduates are representative of the beliefs that have historically allowed studios to be made, classes to be taught, and Mug Nights to be had.

 

 

2014 Mug Night Poster

2014 Mug Night Poster

 

 

The information about past Mug Nights was acquired through email and personal interviews between past and present ACAD Glass Department Faculty, including Norman Faulkner, Tyler Rock, and Lisa Cerny.  Following are statements from graduating students, Alexandra Ireton, Alejandra Samaniego, Ian Pierce, and Danika Kowarchuk

 

Alexandra Ireton

 

Being surrounded by friends in the studio,who spark up late night random conversations about life and art, inspires me to think critically about why I want to create. This is why I was initially attracted to glass; the community built around it is apparent through the camaraderie constantly being displayed in the hot shop. I feel like this has inspired why I enjoy working in multiples. I like to explore the relationship between individual forms and how they interact with one another to create a united end product. By using repetition in pattern, texture or singular items that make up a final piece, I want to focus on the connections created and how they inform the work as a whole. Working in multiples allows the finished version to be easily manipulated by the artist and the viewer, incorporating an element of play and the ability for the work to continue to change. I use the qualities of two different materials to interact with one another so they create either an opposing or reinforcing visual relationship. Relationships that form from the communication of different elements anthropomorphize the objects to me and bring in a further social element.

 

My work is heavily process-oriented and through the use of colour, pattern, and form, I try to highlight the unique qualities each glass object possesses. As the shape of the glass changes, it inevitably affects colour and pattern application, stretching and warping it. I repeat a set of processes to create a family of objects that display how each piece is an individual. By letting the movement of the glass determine the outcome of the surface appearance, deciding when each piece is completed captures a moment in its creation.

 

 

Ireton, Alexandra. Zebra Vases (2014), glass

Ireton, Alexandra. Zebra Vases (2014), glass

 

 

Alejandra Samaniego 

 

I discovered the world of moving stills in a roll of Super 8 film. I discovered warm water; 68 degrees Fahrenheit is the perfect temperature. Filmmaking processes, from pre-camera toys (zoetropes, phenakistoscopes, etc) to Super 8 cameras, are a trick for the eyes and the soul. Seeing little stories in big screens is something that makes any heart jump (even if it is an ant jump). I am telling stories and making beautiful visuals. I am letting myself succumb to the love affair with motion picture. As in any love affair, I am not sure yet what it is exactly that I am getting into or how it is going to turn out. But, for now, I make stories through motion processes. Moving images are a fascinating thing. Developing a roll of Super 8 is better that the best of kisses (at the time).

 

Soy víctima de un dios

frágil, temperamental

que en vez de rezar por mí

se fue a bailar se fue a la disco de un lugar quiso mi disfraz vivir como un mortal como no logró matarme

me regaló, una visión particular

 

Babasónicos

I am victim of a god

fragile and temperamental

that instead of praying for me

went dancing

to a club in some place

wanting my costume

living like a mortal

couldn´t kill me

gave me, a particular vision

 

Babasónicos

 

 

Samaniego, Alejandra. Part 1, Super 8 Film (scan) (2014)

Samaniego, Alejandra. Part 1, Super 8 Film (scan) (2014)

 

 

Ian Pierce

 

As a ‘multidisciplinarian’, Ian’s work encourages the recipient to become engaged in uncovering inherent intricacies.  In glass, he uses a plethora of colour manipulation techniques to create ‘hot paintings’, self described abstract expressionist imagery which meanders between the known and unknown, all the while attempting to consistently embody a precious aesthetic.  His paintings, prints, ceramics, sculptures, woodwork, and drawings, all follow this underlying psychic spirit connection to the corporeal self; dude.  He makes his base in Calgary, Alberta.

 

 

Pierce, Ian. Untitled (2013)

Pierce, Ian. Untitled (2013)

 

 

Danika Kowarchuk

 

My name is Danika Kowarchuk and I am a glass artist, graduating from the Alberta College of Art and Design this year. I work and live in Balzac, Alberta. I enjoy the organic forms that the outdoors presents, and, with this, I feel like glass, with its flexibility, can easily be manipulated into organic shapes. My location has a lot to do with my work and where I start with it. I base my work on the places I travel and explore. The places I explore are most familiar to me from my childhood.  I revisit them to capture images that I didn’t notice when I was younger. I like to take the little things from these places and isolate them so that the observer will observe it in a different way. These objects/scenes are precious to me because they may not be something other people take into mind when noticing a certain piece in the place it should normally belong to.

 

 

Kowarchuk, Danika. Untitled (2014), photograph

Kowarchuk, Danika. Untitled (2014), photograph

 

 

 

L’Histoire de la Mug Night

par Graeme Dearden

 

 

L’idée est simple. Les étudiants en verre produisent des tasses puis fournissent la bière pour les remplir. Les autres ateliers et programmes d’études similaires collectent des fonds en vendant le plus de récipients en verre. Mais le département verre de l’Alberta College Of Art + Design (ACAD) voyait cela d’un autre œil. La traditionnelle vente de verre c’est progressivement transformée en soirée-concert annuelle et fait maintenant partie intégrante de l’évolution du département. Alors que l’ACAD Mug Night entame sa troisième décennie, l’événement constitue un maillon fort du département de verre

 

Avant la Mug Night, le département tenait des événements de nature similaire, le premier étant le Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Pub au milieu des années 80 qui marqua les premières soirées de verre tenues par le département. Sous les accords d’un groupe de musique de Toronto, The Shuffle Demons, le principe de la soirée consistait à boire dans des récipients de verre fait par les étudiants puis à les jeter du haut du 3e étage dans le hall des sculptures.

Après ça, vinrent les soirées plage à la fin des années 80. Celles-ci consistaient à recouvrir le sol de l’atelier de soufflage avec des tonnes de sable et d’accessoires sur le thème de la plage, puis de se détendre sous la douce chaleur des fours. Les étudiants apportaient leurs fûts et buvaient dans des récipients soufflés.

 

Pour des raisons de sécurité, il fallut mettre un terme au début des années 90 à ce genre d’événement. L’administration de l’école avait du mal avec le concept  d’étudiants soûls cassant du verre devant des fours grands ouverts. Depuis ce temps, il devint interdit de consommer de l’alcool à l’école, en dehors des événements précis se déroulant dans la cafétéria ou dans le hall d’entrée.

 

C’est alors que la Mug Night fit ses débuts. A présent, elle se déroule dans la cafétéria de l’école où objets en verre et nourriture sont en vente sur de grandes tables. Les fêtards peuvent se servir en bière grâce à un bar mobile installé en bout de table et profiter de la soirée en bonne compagnie. Plus tard, un orchestre local monte sur scène et entraine tout le monde à danser parmi les tables. Tout cela se poursuit jusque tard dans la nuit, après quoi les étudiants font le ménage.

 

 

Lucas Hrubizna,The Prabes Concert Poster pour la Mug Night 2012 (credit:  Chris Jones)

Lucas Hrubizna,The Prabes Concert Poster pour la Mug Night 2012 (credit: Chris Jones)

 

 

Comme pour honorer les évènements passés, la Mug Night reste intègre et tente de refléter au mieux l’ambiance tant appréciée par la communauté que forment les artistes verriers. Les sessions intenses de production pour préparer l’événement et la participation occasionnelle d’artistes locaux, propulsent chacun dans une ambiance de travail collectif pour une cause commune. Cette pause dans le rythme ordinaire des cours permet aussi aux étudiants d’aborder la production de verre sous un autre angle auquel ils seront potentiellement confrontés plus tard dans leur parcours. Au final, les étudiants, la faculté, les artistes intervenants et les anciens élèves font dons de tous types de récipients, allant de simples coupes à $15 à de gros lots pour la tombola de la soirée.

 

En fin de compte, il est important que la Mug Night soit organisée par les étudiants. Chaque année, ça leur enseigne les aspects pratiques de l’organisation d’un événement, de la coordination et de la budgétisation, tout rendant hommage à l’histoire de la communauté verrière. Tout se construit autour de l’indispensable stratégie d’implication collective, ou chacun y met du sien pour assurer le confort social et financier des personnes avec qui il travaille. Le département de verre d’ACAD désire faire prendre conscience à ses étudiants de l’importance des liens qu’ils créent durant leur temps passé à l’école. Les responsabilités communautaires renforcent ces relations personnelles enrichissantes, tant intellectuellement que professionnellement, et de façon ludique. La réalisation de projets d’ateliers, de certaines formations ainsi que les Mug Nights témoignent de façon historique de l’importance des liens créés dans ces groupes ayant partagé leurs années à ACAD.

 

 

Poster Mug Night 2014

Poster Mug Night 2014

 

 

Les informations concernant les anciennes Mug Nights ont été obtenues grâce à des entrevues par email et personnelles avec des anciens membres et des membres actuels du département verre de l’ACAD, comprenant  Norman Faulkner, Tyler Rock, et Lisa Cerny. Voici ci-dessous les témoignages des étudiants de troisième cycle Alexandra Ireton, Alejandra Samaniego, Ian Pierce et Danika Kowarchuk.

 

Alexandra Ireton

 

Le fait d’avoir pu mener à toute heure dans l’atelier des conversations passionnées avec mon entourage sur les questions de l’art et de la vie en général m’a permis de mener une réflexion constructive sur mon besoin de créer. C’est la raison pour laquelle j’ai été attirée par le verre en premier lieu ; l’impact de la communauté se révèle de façon concrète à travers le travail d’équipe constant en atelier. Je pense que cela a influencé mon enthousiasme pour le travail de groupe. J’aime explorer le lien entre la forme individuelle et son interaction avec les autres pour créer un produit commun. En utilisant la répétition dans la texture, les motifs ou des articles singuliers pour créer une seule pièce finale, je souhaite insister sur les relations qui sont facilement manipulables par l’artiste et l’observateur, en incorporant un élément de jeu qui donne à l’œuvre la possibilité de poursuivre son évolution. Je fais interagir les qualités de deux matériaux différents  afin d’obtenir une relation visuelle qui s’oppose ou se complémente. Les relations formées par la communication entre les différents éléments permet d’anthropomorphiser l’objet et d’apporter une dimension sociale à l’œuvre.

 

Mon travail se base principalement sur le processus et je tente de souligner les qualités uniques de chaque objet de verre à travers l’utilisation de la couleur, des motifs et des formes. Lorsque la forme du verre change, cela modifie inévitablement la couleur et les motifs, en l’étalant ou l’enroulant. Je recrée une suite de procédés pour obtenir une famille d’objets démontrant que chaque pièce est unique. En laissant le mouvement du verre déterminer seul son apparence de surface, je capture l’instant de leur création en décidant d’arrêter chaque pièce à un moment précis.

 

 

Ireton, Alexandra. Zebra Vases (2014), verre

Ireton, Alexandra. Zebra Vases (2014), verre

 

 

Alejandra Samaniego 

 

J’ai découvert le monde des instantanés avec une pellicule de Super 8. J’ai découvert que l’eau chaude à 68 degrés fahrenheit est à la température parfaite. La réalisation de films, des premières caméras (zoetropes, phenakistoscopes, etc) aux Super 8 d’aujourd’hui sont un piège pour les yeux et l’esprit. Regarder des petites histoires sur des grands écrans fait bondir les cœurs (même de petits bonds de fourmis). Je raconte des histoires et je crée des beaux visuels. Je me laisse séduire par mon histoire d’amour avec le cinéma. Comme dans toute histoire d’amour, je ne suis pas certain de ce que je vais y trouver ni de ce que cela va m’apporter. Mais pour le moment, je crée des histoires via le mouvement. Les images défilantes sont fascinantes. Pouvoir développer une pellicule de Super 8 est mieux que le meilleur des baisers (pour le moment).

 

Soy víctima de un dios

frágil, temperamental

que en vez de rezar por mí

se fue a bailar se fue a la disco de un lugar quiso mi disfraz vivir como un mortal como no logró matarme

me regaló, una visión particular

 

Babasónicos

Je suis la victime d’un dieu

Fragile et caractériel

Qui au lieu de prier pour moi

A été danser

Dans un club quelque part

En voulant mon habit

Et vivre comme un mortel

Il n’a pu me tuer

Et m’a donné une vision particulière

 

Babasónicos

 

 

Samaniego, Alejandra. Part 1, Super 8 Film (scan) (2014)

Samaniego, Alejandra. Part 1, Super 8 Film (scan) (2014)

 

 

Ian Pierce

 

En tant qu’artiste pluridisciplinaire, le travail d’Ian pousse l’observateur à découvrir les complexités qui lui sont inhérentes. En verre, il utilise une grande variété de techniques de manipulation de la couleur pour créer des peintures « à chaud », qu’il décrit lui-même comme de l’imagerie expressionniste abstraite voguant de l’inconnu au monde réel, le tout dans une volonté de conserver un esthétisme précieux. Ses peintures, impressions, céramiques, sculptures, sculptures en bois et dessins sont tous reliés par la même vision psychique sous-jacente de l’esprit corporel : dude. Il travaille à Calgary en Alberta.

 

 

Pierce, Ian. Sans titre (2013)

Pierce, Ian. Sans titre (2013)

 

 

Danika Kowarchuk

 

Je m’appelle Danika Kowarchuk et je suis artiste verrier. Je serai diplômée de l’ Alberta College of Art and Design cette année. Je travaille et vis à Balzac en Alberta. J’apprécie les formes biologiques que la nature nous propose et je trouve que le verre peut facilement se manipuler pour obtenir ces formes naturelles. Le lieu où je me situe défini mon travail et la façon dont je l’explore. Je travaille en m’inspirant des lieux où je voyage et que j’explore. Les endroits que j’explore proviennent souvent de mon enfance. Je les ai revisités pour capturer les images que je n’avais pas saisies lorsque j’étais plus jeune. J’aime prendre les petites choses de ces endroits et les isoler pour que l’observateur les regarde d’une façon différente. Ces objets/scènes sont précieux car ils ne correspondent peut être pas à ce que d’autres personnes pourraient remarquer lorsqu’elles observent l’endroit d’où provient la pièce en premier lieu.

 

 

Kowarchuk, Danika. sans titre (2014), photographie

Kowarchuk, Danika. sans titre (2014), photographie

 

 

Share

It Was Great While It Lasted

by Anne Brodie

All photographs courtesy of Carol-Jane Campbell

 

 

In 2013, Red Deer College reluctantly made the decision to close its famous glass hot shop after thirty years. Starting with a couple of weeks of beginner glassblowing in a fairly primitive hot shop, the program grew to four-month glass workshops.  In recent years, the time the hot shop was in use decreased until it became impossible to carry on as the equipment aged, costs soared, and enrolment dwindled.  A new Visual Arts Centre provides excellent facilities for flameworking, casting, and fusing workshops, which will continue as part of Red Deer College’s Summer Series, but hot glass is no longer offered.

 

 

01_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

02_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

The program was unique in offering one or two week hot shop workshops with an amazing lineup of instructors. Stalwarts like Norm Faulkner, Jim Norton, Laura Donefer, and Mark Gibeau were there early on, later joined by Jeff Holmwood, Tyler Rock, and Darren Petersen, all of whom were instrumental in developing the program’s reputation for excellent teaching in a fun atmosphere. As the program grew, international instructors like Nick Mount (Australia), Katie Brown (New Zealand), Fritz Driesbach (USA), Randy Walker (USA), Karen Willenbrink (USA), and Mitchell Gaudet (USA), returned often, drawn by the relaxed atmosphere and the challenge of teaching a wide variety of non-traditional students.

 

 

03_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

04_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

Two memorable Glass Art Association of Canada conferences were held at the college, which included incredible lectures and demos, and a lot serious fun. I’m not sure I will ever forget sitting in the front row of the opening ceremony with Red Deer City council when a certain glass artist mooned Carol Jane Campbell with her significant birthday written on his backside! The conferences did highlight the advantage of having the conference in a smaller centre. Everyone stayed on campus, ate together, students mingled with the “stars”, and everyone was able to get to all the lectures and demos, no buses required!

 

 

05_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

We’ll all miss the hot shop, the loud music, the roar of the glory holes, sitting around watching the lunchtime demos, and the bunch of glassblowers who stuck together through the week and always looked as if they were having fun. It was a challenge to operate a hot shop outdoors for only a few months each year but, thanks to great techs, instructors, and students, we succeeded for many years.

 

 

06_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

It would be hard to talk about the program at RDC without asking one of its greatest supporters, Laura Donefer, for her memories. She taught in the program for many years and advised on the recruitment of instructors, techs, and students. Sometimes as an administrator it was better not to know what was going on in her workshop but, while fun and friendship were an essential part of Laura’s week in Red Deer, she was deadly serious about teaching and bringing out the best in every student. That’s what it was all about at Red Deer College.

 

 

07_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

Laura wrote:

 

Hot shop outside, with a pigeon net on the ceiling so the bird droppings did not fall onto the glass! What could be more fun than spending so many summers at Red Deer College, teaching crazy glass blowing classes to a fabulous bunch of people, and having TAs like Jeff Holmwood to round off the utter insanity of it all! It should have been illegal, all that fun! We blew ridiculous amounts of non-traditional glass, had wild dancing parties, huge bonfires at night after we ate our meals together, and would occasionally find our way into Red Deer proper and storm the VV Boutique for costumes, or get those enormous glasses of margaritas at the local Mexican restaurant. Once we poured hot glass onto a river rock that someone had scooped up out of the local creek and it exploded like a bomb! I should never have been asked to teach there, we were always semi out of control, but, lordy lord, Carol Jane and the gang and I rocked it! I will miss teaching at Red Deer.  Those were some of the best times of my entire life!

 

 

08_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

 

C’était le bon temps

par Anne Brodie

Photographies amicalement fournies par Carol-Jane Campbell

 

 

En 2013, Le Red Deer College a dû fermer à contrecœur son célèbre atelier vieux de 30 ans. Proposant au départ quelques semaines de soufflage de verre pour débutants dans un atelier rudimentaire, le programme s’était développé jusqu’à offrir des formations de quatre mois. Au cours des dernières années, le temps d’utilisation de l’atelier a diminué jusqu’à ce qu’il devienne impossible d’entretenir le matériel vétuste, couteux avec des effectifs trop réduits. Un nouveau Visual Arts Centre fournit un excellent équipement pour la pratique du chalumeau, moulage et fusing, et continuera à faire partie des Ateliers d’Eté du Red Deer College, mais le soufflage ne sera plus proposé.

 

 

01_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

02_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

Le programme était unique en ce qu’il proposait une à deux semaines de travail en atelier avec une myriade incroyable de professeurs. De véritables piliers tels que Norm Faulkner, Jim Norton, Laura Donefer et Mark Gibeau y ont été présents par le passé, puis rejoints par Jeff Holmwood, Tyler Rock, et Darren Petersen, tous ont joué un rôle essentiel dans le développement de l’excellente réputation du programme et de son ambiance détendue. Le programme ayant pris de l’ampleur, d’autres enseignants étrangers s’y sont rendu régulièrement, tels que Nick Mount (Australie), Katie Brown (Nouvelle Zélande), Fritz Driesbach (USA), Randy Walker (USA), Karen Willenbrink (USA) et Mitchell Gaudet (USA), attirés par la bonne ambiance et le challenge d’enseigner à une large variété d’étudiants peu traditionnels.

 

 

03_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

04_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

Deux conférences mémorables de la Glass Art Association of Canada ont eu lieu au collège, apportant des interventions et des démonstrations incroyables ainsi qu’une bonne dose de rire. Je ne pense pas oublier un jour cette place au premier rang lors de la cérémonie d’ouverture aux côtés du conseil municipal de Red Deer lorsqu’un certain artiste a montré ses fesses à Carol Jane Campbell pour mieux lui souhaiter son anniversaire! Ces conférences ont démontré les bénéfices de les tenir dans des endroits restreints. Nous dormions tous sur le campus, nous mangions ensemble, les étudiants se mêlaient aux « stars », et nous pouvions tous assister aux interventions et démonstrations sur place, pas besoin d’autobus !

 

 

05_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

Nous regretterons tous l’atelier, sa musique forte couvrant le ronronnement des creusets, à nous asseoir et regarder les démonstrations du midi avec ce groupe de souffleurs qui s’épaulaient toute la semaine et semblaient toujours s’entendre aussi bien. C’était un réel challenge que d’entretenir un atelier d’extérieur pour quelques mois dans l’année, mais grâce à ces supers enseignants, techniciens et étudiants, nous y sommes parvenus plusieurs années durant.

 

 

06_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

Il serait difficile de parler du programme du RDC sans mentionner l’une de ses plus grandes participantes, Laura Donefer, et de lui réclamer quelques souvenirs. Elle a enseigné au programme durant de nombreuses années et participait au recrutement de ses instructeurs, techniciens et étudiants. En tant qu’administratrice, il valait parfois mieux ne pas savoir ce qui se passait dans son atelier, mais tandis que le bon temps et les amis faisaient partie intégrante des semaines de Laura au Red Deer, elle s’attachait à mener ses cours avec le plus grand sérieux pour inspirer au mieux chaque étudiant. Voilà qui résume pleinement le Red Deer College.

 

 

07_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

Laura nous raconte :

 

Atelier en extérieur, avec un filet anti-pigeons pour éviter que les fientes ne tombent dans le verre ! Quoi de plus fabuleux que de passer tous ces étés au Red Deer College, à enseigner ces cours de soufflage un peu fous, à un groupe de personnes incroyables, accompagnée d’un assistant technique comme Jeff Holmwood, pour réaliser un projet qui relève de l’inconscient ! On frôlait l’illégalité dans toute cette folie ! Nous avons soufflé des quantités incroyables de verre sous forme peu conventionnelle, nous dansions le soir, allumions des feux de camps géants, et nous mangions tous ensemble. De temps à autre, nous sortions du Red Deer pour dévaliser un magasin de déguisements ou prendre des grands verres de Margarita au restaurant mexicain du coin. Une fois nous avons coulé du verre chaud sur une pierre ramassée dans la rivière d’à côté, et elle a explosé comme une bombe ! Jamais il n’aurait fallu me demander d’enseigner là, nous étions toujours à moitié hors de contrôle, mais Carol Jane, le gang et moi-même avons toujours assuré ! Je regretterai mon temps au Red Deer. Ce fut les meilleurs moments de ma vie !

 

 

08_Brodie_ItWasGoodWhileItLasted

 

 

Share

Glass Education in Prague

The Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design

by Brad Copping and Klára Horáčková

 

 

With the focus on education in this issue of Contemporary Canadian Glass, Brad Copping approached Klára Horáčková, the Assistant Professor in the Glass Department at the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design (also known by its original name UMPRUM) in Prague to talk about the program there.

 

CCG: I understand that the Glass Program at AAAD is very much concerned that glass art is seen within the context of other approaches in art and design – possibly a more integrated approach than is taken in North American schools.  Can you tell me about the philosophical underpinnings of the glass program and how it fits into the Academy?  Does the Academy encourage this integrated approach within the various programs?

 

KH: The glass program at UMPRUM has a long tradition and it is very challenging to be in such a position after such strong history. The approach we stand for is not really new.  Basically, in a philosophical way, it professes to the same rules as it always has – accent on good artistic readiness, mastered drawing, sculpting, sketching, broadminded approach and emphasis on comparison in broader perspective. We use the same tools and try to apply them in contemporary context.

 

 

UMPRUM (AAAD in Prague) – Photo credit: Ondřej Přibyl

UMPRUM (AAAD in Prague) – Photo credit: Ondřej Přibyl

 

 

We see that it is important that students don’t stay just within the borders of glass art. Glass is a great and fascinating material but brings many restrictions. Sometimes all the energy is consumed in just solving technological problems to the detriment of the piece itself.

 

While working with glass, it tends to happen that the material itself starts to dictate the result. We are trying to avoid that and begin from the other side, from the art concept or from strong design itself.

 

Students usually spend a lot of time sketching and thinking before the approach to realization. The resulting piece may not necessarily be made of glass or all parts made by students themselves. The goal is to create objects that will stand strong in competition within art and design in general. Of course, we still have the craft issue in mind, and the pieces must be mastered technically, but we perceive craft as a precious tool that we have to cherish, not as an ultimate purpose.

 

I would say that the approach of the other departments at UMPRUM is analogical.

 

The academy always has been very selective and students who want to apply must be well prepared. People come to the academy usually quite well experienced in the field they want to study, which consequently means that knowledge of the craft is taken for granted and the main focus during the educational process lies in development of further qualities of works or advanced techniques.

 

The academy is rather small; every studio has some 20 students in total, which means that professors can afford an individual approach to their students.

 

CCG: I realize that both you and Rony Plesl, the head of the studio, are practicing artists and designers as well as professors.  Could you describe your own practice (and if possible that of Rony Plesl) and how you see it within this integrative approach?

 

KH: We are both very enthusiastic about what we do and our work at the academy in particular.

 

 

RONY PLESL: UOVO, chandeliers designed for czech company Lasvit. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

RONY PLESL: UOVO, chandeliers designed for czech company Lasvit. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

 

 

Rony has much more experience in the field and in teaching than I do since he had been working in glass and design very intensively over thirty years. His own practice is very vivid. He works on many projects at one time and always seems to be running somewhere, yet his work is rather meditative and more about searching for some spiritual quality, which he brings into his pieces by perfect proportions, shapes and strong symbols.

 

 

RONY PLESL: IN-COMPOSITUS 2, cast, coldworked glass. Photo credits: Tomáš Brabec, Patrik Borecký

RONY PLESL: IN-COMPOSITUS 2, cast, coldworked glass. Photo credits: Tomáš Brabec, Patrik Borecký

 

 

I would say that his teaching at the academy naturally follows his practice. He is as demanding on students as he is on himself and requires high level of professionalism from them in everything they do.

 

 

KLÁRA HORÁČKOVÁ: MIRROR, mobile installation, mirrors, metal, electric device. Photo credit: Jan Kuděj

KLÁRA HORÁČKOVÁ: MIRROR, mobile installation, mirrors, metal, electric device. Photo credit: Jan Kuděj

 

 

Myself, I find a lot of inspiration in human mentality, society, relationships, hidden basic principles, and, secretly, in metaphysics. I oscillate between two ways of expressing myself.  One is more material based, where I experiment with glass and other materials.  The other is more minimalistic and conceptual.  And I occasionally flirt with design as well.

 

 

KLÁRA HORÁČKOVÁ: EGGO, fused float glass, patte de verre. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

KLÁRA HORÁČKOVÁ: EGGO, fused float glass, patte de verre. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

 

 

The studies at UMPRUM have always been rather free-minded, without too rigid of a structure. Of course there is always the imprint of the pedagogues who taught there, which is the same as everywhere else. But the main goal has always been to encourage students to find their own way and style, and, most importantly, that they find their own source of inspiration and start to develop their own themes. Self-motivation is a motor, which has to be found during the studies, and which will keep them going after graduation.

 

CCG: Are there other faculty or staff that work within the glass studio?  Could you describe their roles?

 

KH: In our department there are four teachers in total:  Rony Plesl, myself, and two faculty – heads of workshops – Antonín Votruba, who is master of the coldshop, and Ivan Pokorný, who takes care of the kilnshop, enameling, and engraving workshop. They consult on the technological and craft aspect of the projects, organize craft courses, and take care of the workshops in general. We also have external lecturers for special classes and workshops, and, of course, students have many art theory and history classes, which are common to all students of the academy.

 

CCG: As you know, North American schools have been very much focused on building the hand skills necessary to create something with glass.  As a result, students here are very concerned about what kind of equipment is available to them.  Can you describe the equipment in your studio and the amount of access students have to this equipment?

 

KH: The workshops have been always important part of the glass studios and UMPRUM is not an exception.

 

Currently, we have a bit of an old school, but nice and well-equipped coldshop, workshop for casting, fusing, enameling, sandblasting, and classical copper wheel engraving.

 

In the next few years, the academy is planning to build a new technological building, not far from the old one, in which there will be brand new workshops for all the studios.  At the same time, there are plans for a new hotshop in Prague, which would closely cooperate with our glass department.

 

Students have access to the workshop eight hours per day, but this depends on when they find the time between their classes. The academy also has a background in metalworking and woodworking, laser cutting, 3d printing, and a lot of other workshops. Some of them are accessible to all students, some are just for specific departments.

 

CCG: Would you describe a couple of student projects, which exemplify the approach you encourage?

 

KH: Students are encouraged to work very individually and take the responsibility for their own approach. Hence, at the beginning, the tasks are quite controlled and then get more and more individual during the students’ time in the program. Usually, students have one big task for art and one for design in each semester, and all the works are exhibited at the public academy Artsemester exhibition that takes place at the school at the end of every semester.  Some of the students work more conceptually, some feel more comfortable in design.

 

For instance, Jakub Petr has always shown a fascination in geometry, mathematics, physics, and science in general. His works often derive from his zeal for inventing and solving technological difficulties and novelties, and from descriptions of basic principles of the world around him. In his work, Archimeidon, Jakub was developing an idea of centrifugal casting. He constructed a device, which spins the mold in the kiln during the casting process. From this technological aspect, he moved forward to create specific mobile installations using glass cylinders and glycerin, where the natural forces create an illusionary solid glass-like object, which refers to science on one hand and plays with the viewer’s sense of reality on the other.

 

 

JAKUB PETR: TOROID, mobile installation, mixed media, electric motor (lap wheel machine), LED lightsource, Photo credit: Tomáš Souček

JAKUB PETR: TOROID, mobile installation, mixed media, electric motor (lap wheel machine), LED lightsource, Photo credit: Tomáš Souček

 

 

In another piece called Toroid, Jakub addresses mathematical phenomena of 3D curves and string theory, forming an illusion of a toroid object with a fascinating humming mobile light drawing.

 

Tadeáš Podracký often refers in his work to art icons, transforming them into his own specific objects.

 

 

TADEÁŠ PODRACKÝ: JAARS, blown, coldworked glass, wood. Photo credit: Tomáš Brabec

TADEÁŠ PODRACKÝ: JAARS, blown, coldworked glass, wood. Photo credit: Tomáš Brabec

 

 

Lukáš Houdek finds his inspiration in playful jokes and pop culture. He is often juggling with meanings and the confusing of ordinary and luxury.

 

 

LUKÁŠ HOUDEK: GHERKINS, coldworked, glued glass. Photo credit: Filip Dobiás

LUKÁŠ HOUDEK: GHERKINS, coldworked, glued glass. Photo credit: Filip Dobiás

 

 

Tomáš Váp, in his work, Be Strong!, designs containers for doping, questioning the ethical aspect of the desire for success and perfection.

 

 

TOMÁŠ VÁP: BE STRONG! (CONTEINERS FOR DOPING), blown cut, silvered glass, artificial stone. Photo credit: Ondřej Pokorný

TOMÁŠ VÁP: BE STRONG! (CONTEINERS FOR DOPING), blown cut, silvered glass, artificial stone. Photo credit: Ondřej Pokorný

 

 

Kristýna Pojerová often takes her inspiration from family and the home atmosphere, and designs playful and functioning greenhouse light, which would light up your home and provide herbs for your kitchen at the same time.

 

 

KRISTÝNA POJEROVÁ: GREENHOUSE LIGHT, blown, coldworked glass, light source. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

KRISTÝNA POJEROVÁ: GREENHOUSE LIGHT, blown, coldworked glass, light source. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

 

 

Seuljee Kim often uses language of hyperbole. In her work, Object of Desire, the piece is used to challenge society’s illusional priorities.

 

 

SEULJEE KIM: OBJECT OF DESIRE, cast, coldworked glass. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

SEULJEE KIM: OBJECT OF DESIRE, cast, coldworked glass. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

 

 

CCG: Do you encourage foreign students to enroll in the glass program?

 

KH: Foreign students are welcomed to our department, although the capacity is limited. Students can come for a semester exchange or through the Erasmus Program.  Another possibility, which is not so well known, is the Visual Arts program, which was launched at UMPRUM some ten years ago. Visual Arts is a two years master degree program conducted in English. In the beginning, there were just a few departments which took part in it, but now you can select from almost all the departments at the academy, including the glass studio.

 

CCG: What do students end up doing when they leave the glass program?  To sum up, can you describe with what skills you are hoping students will exit the program?

 

KH: Of course, the main goal is that students would carry on their own artistic or design practice. As far as I know, most of the alumni do continue in the field.

Some of them find their way in producing creative design, starting their own brand, or cooperating with bigger glass companies or design studios.  Some of them try to live off of the artwork, which is usually a bit more difficult.  Some of them work in art education or galleries, and very often it is some combination of the aforementioned. And, of course, as everywhere, some graduates start their new career as bartenders. We are trying to minimalize that number a bit.

 

To sum it up, we would like to teach the students a professional attitude towards their work, precision in craft, cleverness and proportion in design, and intelligence in concept.

 

 

 

Enseignement du Verre à Prague

L’Academie des Arts, de l’Architecture et du Design

par Brad Copping et Klára Horáčková

 

 

L’accent étant mis sur l’enseignement dans cette édition du “Contemporary Canadian Glass”, Brad Copping a interrogé Klára Horáčková, qui assiste le département verre de l’Académie des Arts, de l’Architecture et du Design de Prague (aussi connue sous le  nom d’UMPRUM) pour nous parler de leur programme.

 

CCG: Il semble important pour le programme de verre de l’AAAD d’intégrer l’art du verre dans les autres formes d’art et de design avec une approche plus globale que dans nos écoles en Amérique du nord. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur les grands principes de ce programme de verre et de quelle façon il s’intègre à l’Académie ? Académie encourage-t-elle ce concept d’insertion dans les différents programmes ?

 

KH: Le programme de verre de l’UMPRUM a un long passé et c’est un réel défit pour nous que d’occuper cette position après tant d’histoire. Notre approche n’a rien de vraiment nouveau. D’une façon générale, notre philosophie est toujours la même – avec un accent pour les prédispositions artistiques, la maitrise du dessin, la sculpture, le croquis, l’ouverture d’esprit et l’importance de se positionner dans une vue d’ensemble plus large. Nous employons les mêmes outils les mettons à profit dans un contexte plus contemporain.

 

 

UMPRUM (AAAD in Prague) – Photo credit: Ondřej Přibyl

UMPRUM (AAAD in Prague) – Photo credit: Ondřej Přibyl

 

 

Il est important pour nous que les étudiants ne se cantonnent pas aux limites fixées par l’art du verre. Le verre est un matériau fascinant mais qui comporte  beaucoup de restrictions. Il arrive que toute l’énergie soit mise uniquement dans la résolution de problèmes techniques au détriment de la pièce en elle-même.

 

En travaillant le verre, il arrive souvent que le matériau lui-même nous dicte le résultat final. Nous essayons de contourner cela en commençant par l’autre bout, du concept artistique ou d’un design par lui seul.

 

En général les étudiants passent beaucoup de temps à dessiner et à réfléchir avant de débuter la réalisation. La pièce obtenue ne sera pas forcément faite de verre ni toutes les parties réalisées par les étudiants eux-mêmes. Les but est de créer des objets qui auront un impact dans la compétition de l’art et du design en général. Bien sûr, la question de la confection reste à l’esprit et les pièces doivent pouvoir être réalisées techniquement, mais nous considérons l’artisanat comme un outil précieux qu’il nous faut choyer et non comme une fin en soi.

 

Je décrirai l’approche des autres départements de l’UMPRUM comme analogique.

 

L’académie a toujours été très sélective et les étudiants qui postulent doivent être bien préparés. Les personnes qui viennent sont généralement expérimentées dans le domaine qu’elles souhaitent étudier, ce qui signifie que la maitrise de l’art en question est considérée comme déjà acquise et l’objectif principal du cursus est alors de développer des compétences supplémentaires dans cet art et d’approfondir certaines techniques.

 

L’académie est relativement petite, chaque atelier compte vingt étudiants, ce qui permet aux professeurs d’effectuer un suivi individuel avec leurs étudiants.

 

CCG: Je me rends compte que le directeur de l’atelier Rony Plesl et vous-même, êtes tous les deux des artistes et designers actifs tout en enseignant parallèlement. Pouvez-vous nous décrire votre activité (et si possible celle de Rony Plesl également) et la façon dont vous la conciliez avec cette approche intégrative ?

 

KH: Nous sommes tous les deux très contents de ce que nous faisons et plus particulièrement de notre travail à l’académie.

 

 

RONY PLESL: UOVO, chandeliers designed for czech company Lasvit. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

RONY PLESL: UOVO, chandeliers designed for czech company Lasvit. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

 

 

Rony possède plus d’expérience que moi pour enseigner la matière vu qu’il travaille depuis plus de trente ans dans le verre et le design. Il est très actif. Il travaille sur plusieurs projets à la fois et donne toujours l’impression de courir quelque part, pourtant son travail est plutôt méditatif et porte sur la quête d’une qualité spirituelle qu’il illustre à merveille dans ses pièces aux proportions et aux formes parfaites avec des symboles forts.

 

 

RONY PLESL: IN-COMPOSITUS 2, cast, coldworked glass. Photo credits: Tomáš Brabec, Patrik Borecký

RONY PLESL: IN-COMPOSITUS 2, cast, coldworked glass. Photo credits: Tomáš Brabec, Patrik Borecký

 

 

J’aurai tendance à dire que ses méthodes d’enseignement à l’académie correspondent bien à sa façon de travailler. Il attend autant de rigueur de ses étudiants qu’il s’en impose lui-même, et leur demande d’être très professionnels dans tous ce qu’ils entreprennent.

 

 

KLÁRA HORÁČKOVÁ: MIRROR, mobile installation, mirrors, metal, electric device. Photo credit: Jan Kuděj

KLÁRA HORÁČKOVÁ: MIRROR, mobile installation, mirrors, metal, electric device. Photo credit: Jan Kuděj

 

 

Pour ma part, je puise beaucoup mon inspiration dans la psychologie humaine, la société, les relations, les principes de base sous-jacents, et secrètement, dans la métaphysique. L’un est plus tangible et me permets d’expérimenter avec le verre et d’autres matériaux. L’autre est plus minimaliste et conceptuel. De temps à autre, je joue avec le design aussi.

 

 

KLÁRA HORÁČKOVÁ: EGGO, fused float glass, patte de verre. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

KLÁRA HORÁČKOVÁ: EGGO, fused float glass, patte de verre. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

 

 

Les champs d’action des études à l’UMPRUM ont toujours été très libres et sans

encadrement trop rigide. Bien sûr, on ressent toujours la marque de ceux qui sont passés avant, comme partout. Mais le but a toujours été d’encourager les étudiants à trouver leur propre style, et plus important encore, à trouver leur propre source d’inspiration pour commencer à développer des thèmes qui leurs sont personnels. Au cours de leurs études, ils doivent trouver la motivation personnelle qui leur servira de moteur après leur diplôme.

 

CCG: Y a-t-il d’autres professeurs attitrés ou personnes travaillant au sein de l’atelier de verre ? Pouvez-vous nous décrire leur rôle ?

 

KH: Il y a quatre professeurs au total dans notre département: Rony Plesl, moi-même et deux autres enseignants en charge d’ateliers – Antonín Votruba, qui gère l’atelier du verre à froid et Ivan Pokorný qui s’occupe du four, des émaux et du gravage. Ils interviennent sur les aspects techniques et artisanaux des projets, organisent des cours de réalisation et sont responsables des ateliers en général. Nous avons aussi deux intervenants extérieurs qui viennent donner des cours et des ateliers exceptionnels. Et bien sûr, il y a aussi tout un bloc de cours sur la théorie et l’histoire de l’art, qui est commun à tous les étudiants de l’académie.

 

CCG: Comme vous le savez, les écoles en Amérique du nord se sont concentrées sur l’acquisition des compétences nécessaires pour pouvoir créer à partir du verre. De ce fait, les étudiants sont très concernés par le matériel mis à leur disposition. Pouvez-vous décrire l’équipement disponible dans votre atelier et comment les étudiants y ont accès ?

 

KH: Les ateliers ont toujours occupé une place importante dans le travail du verre et l’UMPRUM  n’y fait pas exception.

 

En ce moment, notre atelier pour le verre à froid est un peu démodé mais suffisamment  équipé pour le moulage, fusing, émaillage, gravage au sable et gravage classique à la roue en cuivre.

 

Dans les années à venir, l’académie a prévu de construire un nouveau bâtiment technologique non loin de l’ancien, dans lequel on trouvera des ateliers flambants neufs pour tous les domaines. Simultanément, des plans ont vu le jour pour un nouvel atelier de soufflage à Prague qui pourrait travailler en étroite collaboration avec notre département verre.

 

Les étudiants ont accès à l’atelier huit heures par jour, en fonction du temps qu’ils trouvent entre les cours. L’académie possède aussi du matériel en ferronnerie et ébénisterie, ainsi qu’en découpage laser, imprimerie 3D et bien d’autres ateliers. Certains sont libres d’accès pour tous, d’autres sont réservés à des départements spécifiques.

 

 

CCG: Pouvez-vous nous fournir quelques exemples de projets étudiants qui illustrent cette approche que vous encouragez?

 

KH: Nous encourageons les étudiants à travailler de façon très individuelle et à assumer pleinement la réalisation de leurs projets. C’est pourquoi au départ, les tâches sont relativement définies, puis deviennent de plus en plus individuelles au fur à mesure que les étudiants progressent dans leur cursus. En général, les étudiants ont chaque semestre un projet principal en art et un autre en design. A la fin de chaque semestre, les travaux sont présentés lors de l’exposition publique de l’académie qui prend place dans l’école. Certains étudiants travaillent plutôt de façon conceptuelle et d’autres sont plus à l’aise en design.

 

Par exemple, Jakub Petr a toujours été fasciné par la géométrie, les mathématiques, la physique et la science en général. Son travail découle souvent de son entrain à vouloir sans cesse innover, résoudre des problèmes technologiques et s’inspire de descriptions de principes basiques venant du monde qui l’entoure. Dans son travail Archimeidon, Jakub a développé une idée de moulage centrifugé. Il a construit une machine qui fait tourner le moule dans le four durant le processus de moulage. Partant de ce concept technologique, il a développé ensuite des installations mobiles en utilisant des cylindres de verre et de la glycérine, où les éléments naturels créent l’illusion d’un objet en verre plein, ce qui réfère à la fois à la science et joue avec la perception de la réalité des observateurs en même temps.

 

 

JAKUB PETR: TOROID, mobile installation, mixed media, electric motor (lap wheel machine), LED lightsource, Photo credit: Tomáš Souček

JAKUB PETR: TOROID, mobile installation, mixed media, electric motor (lap wheel machine), LED lightsource, Photo credit: Tomáš Souček

 

 

Dans une autre pièce intitulée  Toroid, Jakub utilise le phénomène mathématique des courbes 3D et de la théorie des cordes pour former l’illusion d’un objet toroid dessiné par une fascinante lumière mobile.

 

Tadeáš Podracký se réfère beaucoup à des icônes de l’art qu’il transforme ensuite en ses propres objets.

 

 

TADEÁŠ PODRACKÝ: JAARS, blown, coldworked glass, wood. Photo credit: Tomáš Brabec

TADEÁŠ PODRACKÝ: JAARS, blown, coldworked glass, wood. Photo credit: Tomáš Brabec

 

 

Lukáš Houdek puise son inspiration de boutades enjouées et de la culture pop. Il jongle souvent avec les significations et la confusion prêtée entre ordinaire et luxe.

 

 

LUKÁŠ HOUDEK: GHERKINS, coldworked, glued glass. Photo credit: Filip Dobiás

LUKÁŠ HOUDEK: GHERKINS, coldworked, glued glass. Photo credit: Filip Dobiás

 

 

Tomáš Váp dans son travail Be Strong!, créé des récipients pour contenir les questions portant sur l’aspect esthétique de notre quête du succès et de la perfection.

 

 

TOMÁŠ VÁP: BE STRONG! (CONTEINERS FOR DOPING), blown cut, silvered glass, artificial stone. Photo credit: Ondřej Pokorný

TOMÁŠ VÁP: BE STRONG! (CONTEINERS FOR DOPING), blown cut, silvered glass, artificial stone. Photo credit: Ondřej Pokorný

 

 

Kristýna Pojerová puise souvent son inspiration de sa famille et de son chez-elle

puis réalise des serres ludiques et fonctionnelles qui peuvent illuminer votre maison et faire pousser des aromates pour votre cuisine en même temps.

 

 

KRISTÝNA POJEROVÁ: GREENHOUSE LIGHT, blown, coldworked glass, light source. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

KRISTÝNA POJEROVÁ: GREENHOUSE LIGHT, blown, coldworked glass, light source. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

 

 

Seuljee Kim utilise souvent le langage de l’hyperbole. Dans son travail Object of Desire, les pièces sont créées pour challenger les priorités illusoires de notre société.

 

 

SEULJEE KIM: OBJECT OF DESIRE, cast, coldworked glass. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

SEULJEE KIM: OBJECT OF DESIRE, cast, coldworked glass. Photo credit: Jaroslav Kvíz

 

 

CCG: Est ce que vous encouragez les étudiants étrangers à s’inscrire au programme verre?

 

KH: Les étudiants étrangers sont les bienvenus dans notre département, bien que notre capacité soit limitée. Ils peuvent faire un semestre d’échange ou suivre le programme Erasmus. L’autre possibilité moins connue, est de passer par le programme Visual Arts lancé à l’UMPRUM il y a dix ans. Visual Arts est un programme de master sur deux ans enseigné en anglais. Au départ, seuls quelques ateliers en faisaient partie, mais pratiquement tous y sont désormais accessibles, dont l’atelier verre.

 

CCG: Une fois leurs études terminées, que deviennent les étudiants en verre par la suite? En résumé, qu’espérez-vous que vos étudiants retiennent en sortant ?

 

KH: Bien entendu notre objectif principal est de faire en sorte que l’étudiant puisse mener à bien sa propre carrière dans l’art et le design. D’après mes sources, c’est le cas pour la plupart des anciens élèves. Certains ont trouvé leur voie dans le design créatif, ont lancé leur propre marque ou ont coopéré avec des entreprises plus importantes de verre ou des ateliers de design. D’autres vivent de leur travail artistique, ce qui est en général un peu plus difficile. Certains travaillent dans l’enseignement de l’art ou les galeries, et bien souvent, c’est une combinaison de tout ce que je viens de vous mentionner. Bien sûr, il y en a toujours qui finissent par changer de plan de carrière et racheter un bar  mais nous essayons de les minimiser.

 

En résumé, nous souhaitons apporter aux étudiants qui débutent leur carrière du professionnalisme, de la précision dans leur art, de l’habileté et des connaissances en design ainsi que l’intelligence de leur concept.

 

 

Share
//