President’s Message Jan 2015

March 2, 2015

Try something new this year.

I am writing this message fresh into 2015 and I have to admit that I feel good about this year and its possibilities, despite last year ending on a sour note.

 

On a GAAC-related note, we were informed that we have lost many of our regional representatives. We are finding it difficult to organize GAAC without those integral positions filled. I started with GAAC as the Ontario representative and really enjoyed being a part of the national conversation as well as informing GAAC’s nearly 400 members of what was going on in my region. I am putting out a call to those who might be interested in this position to contact me directly at gaacpresident@gmail.com to discuss it further. It is a very important position and we need your help. Remember that without volunteers, there is no GAAC.

 

Hearing that Canadian Glass was losing arguably one of its strongest supporters, with Galerie Elena Lee closing, also brought a sad end to 2014. Not only is it one fewer gallery to show our glass, but Elena has also supported our Canadian Glass community for some 35 years. Elena remains strong and optimistic, but I would hate to not mention her importance and the void left with the closing of her space.

 

On an optimistic note, a brand new year is the best time to make a fresh start. This year already looks like it will be great. If you have not heard, 2015 has been called the Year of Craft: a year-long, nation-wide festival aimed at promoting craft as a key player in Canadian culture. The type of events include craft exhibitions, fairs, book launches, open houses, conferences, workshops, competitions, publications, community events and more. It is a great time to be part of craft and I want to hear of all your events and encourage you to promote them on the Craft Year website.

 

Another fresh start will happen for Stephanie Baness as the winner of GAAC’s Pilchuck Scholarship. She is planning to take Erika Tada’s class on hollow-core and press moulds (and I am very jealous!!!). See more of Stephanie’s work on her GAAC profile page. Jurors were Benjamin Kikkert, Steven Tippin and Gilles Payette.

 

I am personally making it my goal to try something new this year. I have already enrolled for curling, but I also want to break new ground professionally. I am not sure what I will do yet, but I challenge you to try something new this year too. Maybe you will take an exciting class, like Stephanie, or try new ways to promote your event (like the 2015 Craft Year). Maybe you, too, will just try not to fall while curling, but please make it your goal to learn about something new. It will lead to something great. It always does.

Stay warm friends,

Steven.

 

 

Essayez quelque chose de nouveau cette année

 

Je vous écris ce message alors que 2015 vient à peine de commencer et j’ai un bon pressentiment sur cette année et ce qu’elle va nous apporter de nouveau.

 

Dans un des communiqués internes de la GAAC, on nous a informés que plusieurs de nos représentants régionaux nous quittaient. Il nous est difficile de faire fonctionner la GAAC sans que tous ces postes soient occupés.  J’ai moi-même débuté à la GAAC en tant que représentant de l’Ontario et j’ai vraiment apprécié de pouvoir faire partie des débats à l’échelle nationale et d’informer les quelques 400 membres de ce qui avait lieu dans ma région.  Je lance donc un appel à ceux qui pourraient être intéressés par ces postes et les invite à me contacter directement pour en parler à gaacpresident@gmail.com.  C’un rôle très important et nous avons besoin de vous. N’oubliez jamais que sans  cette aide bénévole, la GAAC n’existerait pas.

 

L’annonce de la fermeture de la galerie Elena Lee, une de nos plus grands supporter du verre canadien, a donné une triste teinte à cette fin de 2014. Non seulement c’était une des seule galeries à exposer notre verre, mais Elena soutenait la communauté verrière du Canada depuis 35 ans. Elena reste forte et optimiste, mais je souhaite quand même faire allusion à l’importance qu’elle avait et le vide qu’elle a laisse derrière elle après la fermeture de son espace.

 

Commencer une nouvelle année est donc la meilleure façon de tout reprendre de façon optimiste. Cette année démarre bien. Au cas où vous ne le savez pas encore, 2015 a été déclarée année de l’artisanat : un festival qui va s’étaler sur toute l’année dans le pays entier pour promouvoir l’artisanat en tant qu’élément clé de la culture canadienne.  Sont prévus au programme de cet événement des expositions artisanales, des foires, des lancements de livres dédiés, des portes ouvertes, des conférences, des ateliers, des concours, des publications, des événements locaux, et bien plus encore.  C’est le moment idéal pour faire partie de l’artisanat et je souhaite que vous m’informiez de tous vos événements. Je vous encourage également à les promouvoir sur le site Craft Year .

 

Stephanie Baness prend elle aussi un nouveau départ en tant que lauréate de la  bourse GAAC à Pilchuck. Elle a prévu de suivre les cours d’Erika Tada sur les moulages (et je suis très envieux !). Allez sur sa page de profil de notre site pour en savoir plus sur le travail de Stéphanie. Benjamin Kikkert, Steven Tippin et Gilles Payette faisaient partie des jurés.

 

Personnellement, je me suis fixé comme résolution pour cette année de tenter quelque chose de nouveau. Je me suis déjà inscrit au curling mais j’ai l’intention de faire du nouveau professionnellement aussi. Je ne suis encore pas certain de ce que je vais essayer mais je vous conseille d’en faire autant. Peut-être que vous suivrez un nouveau cours comme Stéphanie, ou vous essayerez de nouvelles façons de promouvoir vos événements (comme l’année de l’artisanat 2015). Peut-être que vous aussi, vous essayerez de garder l’équilibre en jouant au curling, mais fixez-vous cet objectif que de découvrir quelque chose de nouveau. Cela ne vous sera que bénéfique. C’est toujours le cas.

Restez au chaud les amis,

Steven.

Share

Semina Percurrenta

From Both Sides of the Border

by Valérie Paquin

 

Why do borders have to divide human lives?
Couldn’t we be more like seeds that travel freely in the wind? 

 

From February 19 to May 15, 2015, the Espace VERRE gallery will present a new exhibition by glass artists Montserrat Duran Muntadas and Jean-Simon Trottier.

 

From both sides of the border (2014) (Photo: Claude Lortie)

From both sides of the border (2014) (Photo: Claude Lortie)

 

A Spaniard woman and Canadian man meet, fall in love and decide to live together. But, following this decision, they soon discover the numerous laws, regulations and other red tape preventing them from completing their union.

 

Trottier Muntadas. Averrhoa carambola (2015), blown glass, chain, iron and wire, 130 x 150 cm. (Photo: René Rioux)

Trottier Muntadas. Averrhoa carambola (2015), blown glass, chain, iron and wire, 130 x 150 cm. (Photo: René Rioux)

 

This story, that of Montserrat and Jean-Simon, is the starting point of their joint project entitled Semina Percurrenta: Latin words, which, loosely translated, mean ”seeds that travel.”

 

Trottier Muntadas. Asclepia syriaca (2015), blown glass and wood, 80 x 90 cm (Photo: René Rioux)

Trottier Muntadas. Asclepia syriaca (2015), blown glass and wood, 80 x 90 cm (Photo: René Rioux)

 

Muntadas and Trottier were inspired by various plants that defy borders in creating their sculptural installations.

 

Trottier Muntadas. Bixa orellana (2015), blown glass and steel, 40 x 20 cm (one piece) (Photo: René Rioux)

Trottier Muntadas. Bixa orellana (2015), blown glass and steel, 40 x 20 cm (one piece) (Photo: René Rioux)

 

Seeds became the metaphor for freedom because they have defied notorious dividers, such as the Berlin Wall, the Israel-Palestine wall and the Mexico-United States barrier. Seeds ignore natural boundaries such as oceans or deserts by being swept off by the wind, floating on waves or attaching themselves to animal fur, all without having to fill out any paperwork.

 

Trottier Muntadas. Scabiosa stellata (2015), blown glass, wire and rubber, 30 x 40 cm (one piece). (Photo: René Rioux)

Trottier Muntadas. Scabiosa stellata (2015), blown glass, wire and rubber, 30 x 40 cm (one piece). (Photo: René Rioux)

 

After receiving a Bachelor of Arts and a diploma from the Escuela Superior del Vidrio of La Granja (Spain), Montserrat Duran Muntadas participated in various international exhibitions, notably in Germany, France, and the United Kingdom. In Spain, she is best known for her conceptual and mixed media creations.

 

After completing his glass art studies at Espace VERRE, Jean-Simon Trottier worked abroad where he honed his glass art skills alongside some of the best international glass artists. His experience makes him one of the best
glassblowers in Canada. He has taught glassblowing at Espace VERRE since 2011.

 

Semina Percurrenta: From Both Sides of the Border is their first duo exhibition.

 

Trottier & Muntadas in the Espace VERRE hot shop. (Photo: Claude Lortie)

Trottier & Muntadas in the Espace VERRE hot shop. (Photo: Claude Lortie)

 

For the Nuit Blanche à Montréal event on February 28, the pair is planning an interactive component, related to their exhibition, and will give a special performance in the warmth of Espace VERRE’s hot shop.

www.trottiermuntadas.com

 

 

 

Semina Percurrenta

Des deux côtés de la frontière

par Valérie Paquin

 

Faut-il qu’il existe des frontières qui viennent trancher les histoires humaines?
Ne pourrions-nous pas être comme des graines emportées par le vent? 

 

Du 19 février au 15 mai 2015, la galerie Espace VERRE présente une exposition inédite des artistes verriers Montserrat Duran Muntadas et Jean-Simon Trottier.

 

Des deux côtés de la frontière (2014) (Photo : Claude Lortie)

Des deux côtés de la frontière (2014) (Photo : Claude Lortie)

 
Une Espagnole et un Canadien se rencontrent, tombent amoureux et désirent vivre ensemble. C’est alors qu’ils découvrent les innombrables lois, règles et autres embûches administratives se dressant en opposition à leur union.

 

Trottier Muntadas. Averrhoa carambola (2015), verre soufflé, chaine, métal et câbles, 130 x 150 cm. (Photo: René Rioux)

Trottier Muntadas. Averrhoa carambola (2015), verre soufflé, chaine, métal et câbles, 130 x 150 cm. (Photo: René Rioux)

 

Cette histoire, celle de Montserrat et de Jean-Simon, est à l’origine de leur projet conjoint élaboré sous la bannière Semina Percurrenta : mots latins qui, traduits librement, signifient « les graines qui voyagent. »

 

Trottier Muntadas. Asclepia syriaca (2015), verre soufflé et bois, 80 x 90 cm (Photo: René Rioux)

Trottier Muntadas. Asclepia syriaca (2015), verre soufflé et bois, 80 x 90 cm (Photo: René Rioux)

 

Les installations sculpturales de Muntadas et Trottier s’inspirent des plantes qui transgressent les frontières. La graine devient ainsi l’image métaphorique de la liberté.

 

Trottier Muntadas. Bixa orellana (2015), verre soufflé et acier, 40 x 20 cm (une pièce) (Photo: René Rioux)

Trottier Muntadas. Bixa orellana (2015), verre soufflé et acier, 40 x 20 cm (une pièce) (Photo: René Rioux)

 

Des frontières cruellement célèbres telles que le mur de Berlin, le mur Israël-Palestine, la barrière États-Unis-Mexique, ou des frontières naturelles jugées infranchissables tels les océans et les déserts, sont aisément franchies par les graines, emportées par les vents, flottant sur les vagues, agrippées à la fourrure des animaux, sans jamais de formulaire à remplir.

 

Trottier Muntadas. Scabiosa stellata (2015), verre soufflé, câble et caoutchouc, 30 x 40 cm (une pièce). (Photo: René Rioux)

Trottier Muntadas. Scabiosa stellata (2015), verre soufflé, câble et caoutchouc, 30 x 40 cm (une pièce). (Photo: René Rioux)

 

Après un baccalauréat en arts et l’obtention de son diplôme de l’École supérieure du verre de La Granja (Espagne), Montserrat Duran Muntadas  participe à plusieurs expositions internationales, notamment en Allemagne, en France et au Royaume-Uni. En Espagne, elle est reconnue pour ses œuvres conceptuelles aux techniques mixtes.

 

Après avoir complété ses études à Espace VERRE, Jean-Simon Trottier part travailler à l’étranger où il perfectionne ses habilités aux côtés des meilleurs artisans verriers du globe. Son savoir-faire et son expérience le placent parmi les meilleurs souffleurs de verre au Canada. Depuis 2011, il enseigne la technique du verre soufflé à Espace VERRE.

 

Semina Percurrenta : des deux côtés de la frontière est leur première exposition en duo.

 

Trottier & Muntadas dans l’atelier de l’Espace VERRE. (Photo: Claude Lortie)

Trottier & Muntadas dans l’atelier de l’Espace VERRE. (Photo: Claude Lortie)

 

Pour la programmation spéciale de la Nuit blanche à Montréal, le samedi 28 février, le duo prépare une animation spéciale dans l’atelier de verre à chaud ainsi qu’un volet participatif en lien avec la thématique de leur exposition.

 

www.trottiermuntadas.com

 

Share

Formative Glass Exhibit at the Leighton Art Centre September 27- October 26, 2014

by Stephanie Doll

 

Front of the Invitation

Front of the Invitation

 

It is a rare opportunity that the Leighton Art Centre’s (LAC) Heritage Home Art Gallery gets to host a full glass exhibition. The LAC, known for its two-dimensional landscape exhibits, opened its doors to Formative, a group glass exhibition organized by Katherine Lys and Julia Reimer, featuring local talent from Black Diamond’s popular Firebrand Glass Studio. Formative featured the work of six glass artists including Elisabeth Cartwright, Jamie Gray, Melanie Long, Julia Reimer, Tyler Rock and Katherine Russell. This diverse group came together to demonstrate the boundless borders of glass art in Alberta.

 

Long, Melanie

Long, Melanie

 

Gray, Jamie. Bison

Gray, Jamie. Bison

 

Formative featured a wall of blown and moulded deer busts by artist Melanie Long, which were flanked by Tyler Rock’s “The Almighty Voice” installation of four blown glass domes and found objects. Jamie Gray’s mirrored bison skull acted as the focal point of the exhibit. Hanging on the historical LAC easel in the center of the gallery, the skull shared the light with Julia Reimer’s blown glass bird’s nest and sculptural wall pieces. On the east wall of the gallery, the matte quality of Katherine Russell’s fused and sand carved panels was juxtaposed with Elisabeth Cartwright’s bird’s nest and branches, covered in a thin cocoon of glistening, webbed glass.

 

Russell, Katherine. Along These Lines

Russell, Katherine. Along These Lines

 

Cartwright, Elisabeth

Cartwright, Elisabeth

 

Formative presented emerging glass artists alongside established practitioners. The works of Firebrand’s mature artists reflect conceptual expressions while emerging artists focus on the manipulation of glass media and exploring the possibilities of molten glass. Artists Tyler Rock and Jamie Gray presented two standout conceptual pieces, both of which narrate stories of Alberta’s post-colonial realities, a topic that is rarely breached in the landscape-focused LAC.

 

Reimer, Julia. Flotsam

Reimer, Julia. Flotsam

 

Organizer Julia Reimer’s choice to merge new and established artists demonstrates the key role Firebrand Glass Studio plays in nurturing a vibrant community of glass artists in Alberta. Not only does Firebrand provide studio space for artists, it also acts as a hub, providing the community and support necessary in developing a successful glass art career. Formative is the fruit of the Firebrand Glass Studio’s labour, and it indicates that the glass community in Southern Alberta is thriving. Not only does Southern Alberta have a strong group of emerging glass artists, but they are also supported by an equally strong group of mentors, including glass veterans Tyler Rock and Julia Reimer at the Firebrand Glass Studios in Black Diamond.

 

 

 

Exposition verre de Formative au Leighton Art Centre Du 27 septembre au 26 octobre 2014

par Stephanie Doll

 

Front of the Invitation

Front of the Invitation

 

C’est une véritable opportunité de pouvoir admirer à la Heritage Home Art Gallery du  Leighton Art Centre (LAC) une exposition entièrement consacrée au verre. Habituellement connu pour ses expositions de paysages en 2D, le LAC a ouvert ses portes à Formative, une exposition groupée organisée par by Katherine Lys et Julia Reimer sur le verre et présentant les œuvres des talents locaux du fameux atelier Firebrand Glass Studio de Black Diamond. Formative rassemble les six artistes : Elisabeth Cartwright, Jamie Gray, Melanie Long, Julia Reimer, Tyler Rock et Katherine Russell. Ce groupe éclectique s’est rassemblé pour démontrer les possibilités à l’infini de l’art du verre en Alberta.

 

Long, Melanie

Long, Melanie

 

Gray, Jamie. Bison

Gray, Jamie. Bison

 

Formative nous présente un mur de bustes de chevreuils moulés et soufflés par l’artiste Mélanie Long, accompagné de l’installation de Tyler Rock “ The Almighty Voice” de quatre dômes en verre soufflé protégeant des objets trouvés. Le crâne de bison miroitant de Jamie Gray est l’incontournable point central de l’exposition. Il est accroché à l’antique présentoir du LAC au cœur de la galerie. Le crâne partage le feu des projecteurs avec les nids d’oiseaux en verre soufflé et les pièces sculpturales de Julia Reimer. Sur la façade Est, l’aspect matte des panneaux de verre fusés et sablés de Katherine Russel est juxtaposé aux branches et nids d’oiseaux d’Elisabeth Cartwright, autour desquels  s’entremêle un verre fin et scintillant.

 

Russell, Katherine. Along These Lines

Russell, Katherine. Along These Lines

 

Cartwright, Elisabeth

Cartwright, Elisabeth

 

Aux côtés de ceux déjà largement reconnus, Formative nous a présenté des artistes émergents. Le travail des artistes plus anciens de Firebrand reflète des expressions plus conceptuelles tandis que les artistes qui débutent se concentrent surtout sur la pratique du verre en elle-même, et l’exploration des possibilités du verre en fusion. Tyler Rock et Jamie Gray nous ont présenté deux œuvres conceptuelles remarquables, traitant toutes deux de la situation postcoloniale de l’Alberta, un sujet rarement abordé dans les différents paysages habituellement exposés au LAC.

 

Reimer, Julia. Flotsam

Reimer, Julia. Flotsam

 

Le choix de la part de l’organisatrice de mêler des artistes à la réputation établie à des artistes plus jeunes d’expérience nous montre le rôle essentiel du Firebrand Glass Studio dans l’entretien d’une communauté vibrante d’artistes verriers en Alberta. Non seulement le Firebrand fournit un espace de travail pour les artistes, il est aussi une plaque tournante qui alimente la communauté et apporte le soutien nécessaire pour développer une carrière brillante dans le verre. Formative est le fruit du travail du Firebrand Glass Studio et nous démontre que la communauté du verre en Alberta est en pleine ébullition.  Non seulement le Sud de l’Alberta  héberge un grand nombre d’artistes émergents en verre, mais ils sont soutenus par un nombre équivalent de mentors et de vétérans du verre comme Tyler Rock et Julia Reimer au Firebrand Glass Studio de Black Diamond.

Share

Thinking Outside the Gallery

by Ryan M. Fairweather

 

Tim Belliveau, Phillip Bandura and I started Bee Kingdom full-time in 2006, and have been exploring different methods of showing and selling ever since. With a non-traditional sculptural approach to blown glass, we have discovered a variety of successful methods of exhibiting, which fit the structure of our collective.

 

Our schooling directed us towards the gallery approach, but after a few years of trying to sell in a range of retail venues, we were forced to retract our work because it could not provide enough cash flow to sustain the high overhead of a glassblowing studio, let alone three artists.

 

Around this time, social media was becoming common, and it allowed us to share our work with a broader audience. Also, between the three of us, we had graphic design, public relations and writing skills. Because we had the tools to market ourselves, we began focusing on a DIY approach to showing and selling out of our studio. What was once our living space became our show space, and we regularly hosted events, which gave local audiences the chance to view the spectacle of glassblowing.

 

As an alternative to retail glass galleries, we have shown in a variety of venues. For example, we were featured artists in the Berlin-based Pictoplasma Character Festival in 2012, as well as in their later exhibition in an abandoned warehouse in Berlin and at the MARCO in Monterrey, Mexico in 2014. This organization celebrates character art and we were the sole artists working in glass. We have also shown at the Katakouzenos House Museum in Athens. As described on their website, the museum is a revived historical Athenian house, which “functioned since 1960 as a literary salon; its rooms have hosted many visitors of international fame, mainly artists but also writers and poets; it also contains a representative collection of works by the most important artists of the so-called Hellenic “1930s generation”, and by many international artists, too.”

 

Over the years, we have developed a valuable network of artists, directors, and curators, which have been integral to our showing history. An early gallery director, Anna Ostberg (of the Ruberto-Ostberg Gallery in Calgary), has shown five of our exhibitions, presenting a combination of blown glass and mixed-media 3D and 2D works. This showing style is more traditional, but there is value in strengthening our relationship with local audiences and obtaining high-quality photographic documentations to contribute to our portfolio, media and project proposals.

 

As a twist on the public art model, where one per cent of a city building budget is spent on a large piece of site-specific sculpture, the Watershed+ program in Calgary offers a residency style project. In 2014 we sculpted 6 species of water microbes used in water treatment. These sculptures will be installed at the Water Treatment Centre and also include a traveling component.

 

The traditional museum and gallery model still has an important place in our infrastructure, but we have found increased success by using social media, controlling our own website and using a DIY approach to representing ourselves.

 

Bee Kingdom is Ryan Marsh Fairweather, Phillip Bandura, and Tim Belliveau. Based in Calgary and Montreal, the three graduated from the Alberta College of Art and Design in 2005 and collaborate on glass exhibitions and various projects. Visit www.beekingdom.ca for more information about the studio.

 

 

 

Sortir des sentiers des galeries

par  Ryan M. Fairweather

 

Tim Belliveau, Phillip Bandura et moi-même avons débuté à plein temps au Bee Kingdom en 2006 et nous avons testé les différentes méthodes pour exposer et vendre nos œuvres. En adoptant une approche non traditionnelle pour nos sculptures en verre soufflé, nous avons découvert une large variété de méthodes efficaces pour exposer qui convenaient à la structure de notre collectif.

 

Les formations nous apprennent à nous orienter vers les galeries. Mais après plusieurs années de tentatives infructueuses, nous avons dû chercher d’autres solutions car nous ne parvenions pas à rentabiliser le coût élevé de notre atelier de soufflage, qui plus est pour trois artistes.

 

C’est à cette même période que les réseaux sociaux ont commencé à devenir populaires, et cela nous a permis de montrer notre travail à un public plus vaste. En plus, à nous trois nous combinions des talents en graphisme, en relations publiques et en qualité d’écriture. Comme nous possédions ces outils pour nous mettre en valeur, nous avons commencé à réfléchir à des techniques « maison » pour promouvoir nos œuvres en dehors de l’atelier. Nous avons ainsi transformé notre espace de travail en salle d’exposition où nous avons  régulièrement organisé des événements, ce qui nous a permis de faire découvrir au public local l’art du soufflage.

 

Pour remplacer les galeries, nous avons choisi d’exposer dans des endroits variés. Par exemple, nous étions invités au Pictoplasma Character Festival à Berlin en 2012, ainsi que par la suite dans une de leurs expositions qui a pris place dans une maison abandonnée, puis au  MARCO de Monterrey au Mexique en 2014. Dans cet événement mettant l’art de caractère à l’honneur, nous étions les seuls artistes verriers présents. Nous avons aussi exposé au  Katakouzenos House Museum d’Athènes. Tel que décrit sur son site internet, le musée est une réplique d’une maison antique d’Athènes faisant office de salon littéraire depuis 1960. La maison a vu défiler de nombreuses personnes de renommée internationale, artistes, écrivains et poètes. Il y a à l’intérieur une collection imposante, réunissant les artistes les plus connus de la fameuses période « hellénique des années 30 » ainsi que de nombreux autres artistes internationaux.

 

Au fil des années, nous avons développé un précieux réseau d’artistes, de directeurs et de commissaires, qui ont participé à notre développement.  Anna Ostberg, directrice de la Ruberto-Ostberg Gallery de Calgary a exposé à cinq reprises nos collections, en présentant un mix de pièces de verre soufflé et d’œuvres multi-matériaux en 2D et en 3D. Cette façon de présenter est plus traditionnelle, mais elle apporte une valeur ajoutée dans la consolidation de notre lien avec le public local. Cela nous permet aussi d’obtenir  des photographies de qualité de nos œuvres pour agrémenter notre portfolio et améliorer la présentation de nos projets sous divers formats médiatiques.

 

Fidèle à la tradition de l’art urbain, 1% du budget d’un immeuble peut être dédié à une grande sculpture dédiée au bâtiment. Le programme Watershed+ de Calgary nous a ainsi proposé un projet similaire. En 2014, nous avons sculpté six espèces de bactéries aquatiques utilisées dans le traitement des eaux. Ces sculptures vont être installées au Centre de Traitement des Eaux et incluront aussi des éléments mobiles.

 

Le modèle traditionnel du musée et de la galerie occupe toujours une place importante dans notre infrastructure, mais nous avons amélioré nos chances de succès en nous servant des réseaux sociaux, en gérant notre propre site internet et en utilisant les moyens du bords pour nous faire connaitre.

 

Bee Kingdom est représenté par Ryan Marsh Fairweather, Phillip Bandura, et Tim Belliveau. Basé à Calgary ainsi qu’à Montréal, les trois sont diplômés de l’Alberta College of Art and Design en 2005. Ils collaborent dans des expositions sur le verre et des projets variés. Rendez-vous sur www.beekingdom.ca pour en savoir plus sur l’atelier.

 

Share

The Big Smoke – No Regrets

by Ed Colberg

 

One year ago I was in my final semester of a five year BFA at the Alberta College of Art + Design. My plan, after graduation, was to start working full-time to fund hot shop rental and to save money towards possibly building a studio. It was a terrifying prospect, honestly, with the high cost of studio rental, the less refined hand skills that come with blowing less frequently and the sudden loss of so many amazing facilities and peers under one roof. The transition from art school to a sustainable professional career is a tough one.

About this time, last year, I decided to apply to Harbourfront Centre’s Artist-in-Residence program. I was reluctant, at first, because I wasn’t sure I’d like living in the massive urban centre of Toronto and because I would have to leave my friends and family behind. I also did not really think I would get in, as I had not had much luck with the other residencies I had applied to while in school. Nonetheless, I decided to apply and see what happened. I got in. So, in September, I packed a U-haul full of a heavily culled collection of glass, two bicycles (also a culled collection) and the rest of my worldly possessions and moved to Toronto. No regrets.

 

Artist-in-Residence Aurora Darwin in the hot shop.

Artist-in-Residence Aurora Darwin in the hot shop.

 

Harbourfront Centre provides resident artists with 24/7 access to a hot shop, cold working facilities, kilns, a plaster room, a laser engraver, a 3-D printer, a community of craft artists, business and artistic advisory committees, opportunities to teach classes, onsite galleries, events and more. Not least of all, it has catalyzed many outside opportunities. The residency has lead to a small grant, local businesses contacting me about carrying my work, opportunities to show and sell my work in venues visited by tens of thousands of people and an occasional assistance gig with David Thai, all in the span of a few months. Who knows what all this may lead to? Harbourfront Centre is helping to create a snowball effect with my career.

 

Artist-in-Residence Silvia Taylor and Jesse Bromm in the hot shop.

Artist-in-Residence Silvia Taylor and Jesse Bromm in the hot shop.

 

I suspect that the first few years of trying to establish a professional art practice are the most difficult, and while there are many paths one may take to succeed, I do not think my path as an emerging artist would be taking form so nicely were it not for Harbourfront Centre. I think it helped provide every opportunity I needed to succeed in creating a sustainable professional practice. I can not express enough thanks to everyone who helps to make the Artist-in-Residence program possible and to those who helped me to get here.

I hope that reading about my experience might encourage someone else who might be reluctant to apply to Harbourfront Centre’s Artist-in-Residence program. Harbourfront Centre has summer, annual and short term residencies available to students, recent grads and mid-career artists.

You can find more information here:

http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/craft/artists-in-residence/

Applications are due on Friday, March 13, 2015 @ 5pm Toronto local time.

 

Artist-in-Residence Ed Colberg in the cold shop.

Artist-in-Residence Ed Colberg in the cold shop.

 

 

Ed Colberg was first introduced to working with hot glass in 2005. He has studied glass blowing and glass sculpture with many prominent names in the Canadian and International glass art community. He recently graduated with Distinction from the Alberta College of Art + Design.  Ed currently lives in Toronto, Ontario where he is a full time Aritist-in-Residence in the glass studio at Harbourfront Centre.  www.edcolberg.com

 

 

La grande ville – Sans regrets

par Ed Colberg

 

L’année dernière se profilait le dernier semestre de mes 5 années d’études en BFA à l’Alberta College of Art + Design. Après l’obtention de mon diplôme, j’avais dans l’idée de trouver un emploi pour financer la location d’un atelier et mettre de l’argent de côté pour construire mon propre atelier un jour. L’idée me pétrifiait réellement, je craignais avec le cout élevé de la location de perdre en précision des gestes par le manque de pratique, en plus du fait que les équipements et mes fabuleux collègues ne seraient plus réunis sous un même toit.

A cette même période l’année passée, je me suis décidé à postuler pour être artiste en résidence au Harbourfront Centre. Au départ je n’étais pas spécialement convaincu. Je craignais de ne pas apprécier la vie dans une grosse ville comme Toronto, et j’appréhendais de quitter mes amis et ma famille. Je n’étais pas non plus certain d’être sélectionné, puisque mes demandes précédentes pour d’autres résidences avaient été refusées par le passé. Mais j’ai quand même voulu tenter au cas où, et j’ai été accepté. Alors en Septembre dernier j’ai rempli mes valises d’une lourde sélection de pièces de verre, de deux bicyclettes (aussi tirées de ma sélection) et de l’entité de mes biens, et je suis parti pour Toronto. Sans regrets.

 

Aurora Darwin, artiste en résidence dans l’atelier de soufflage

Aurora Darwin, artiste en résidence dans l’atelier de soufflage

 

Le Harbourfront Centre fournit aux artistes en résidence un accès 24h/24h à l’atelier pour le travail à chaud comme à froid, des fours, une salle de moulage, un graveur laser, une imprimante 3D, une communauté d’artistes en tous genres, des conseillers en arts et en affaires, des opportunités d’enseigner, des galeries en ligne, des événements auxquels participer, et bien plus encore. Chose non négligeable, cela attire de nombreuses opportunités extérieures. La résidence m’a ainsi permis d’obtenir une petite bourse, un contact avec certains commerces locaux, l’occasion d’exposer et de vendre mes œuvres lors d’événements visités par des dizaines de milliers de personnes et la possibilité d’assister David Thai de temps en temps, le tout sur une durée de quelques mois. Qui sait où tout cela peut nous conduire ? Le Harbourfront Centre va contribuer à créer un effet boule de neige sur ma carrière.

 

Silvia Taylor, artiste en résidence, et Jesse Bromm dans l’atelier de soufflage

Silvia Taylor, artiste en résidence, et Jesse Bromm dans l’atelier de soufflage

 

Lorsqu’on démarre une carrière, les premières années sont les plus difficiles. Et bien qu’il y ait beaucoup de chemins différents pour y parvenir, je ne crois pas que le mien aurait pris une aussi bonne tournure sans le coup de pouce du Harbourfront Centre. Je pense que cela m’a permis de saisir toutes les occasions bénéfiques pour réussir à développer une carrière pérenne. Je ne peux remercier assez tous ceux qui ont rendu ce programme d’artiste en résidence possible et m’ont aidé à y parvenir.

J’espère qu’en lisant mon expérience, cela va en encourager d’autres qui sont réticents à l’idée de postuler au programme d’artiste en résidence du Harbourfront Centre. Le Centre propose aussi des résidences d’été, à l’année ou de courte durée, ouvertes aux étudiants, aux nouveaux diplômés et aux artistes à mi-parcours.

Vous trouverez plus d’informations sur le site:

http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/craft/artists-in-residence/

Les candidatures doivent être déposées au plus tard le vendredi 13 mars à 17h; heure de Toronto.

 

Ed Colberg, artiste en résidence dans l’atelier de travail à froid

Ed Colberg, artiste en résidence dans l’atelier de travail à froid

 

 

Ed Colberg a découvert le travail du verre à chaud en 2005. Il a étudié le soufflage et la sculpture du verre avec des grands noms de l’art du verre de la communauté canadienne et internationale. Il a récemment obtenu son diplôme avec mention de l’Alberta College of Art + Design. Ed habite à présent à Toronto en Ontario où il est devenu artiste en résidence à plein temps dans l’atelier verrier du Harbourfront Centre.  www.edcolberg.com

Share

Early Canadian Studio Glass

A Conversation with Norman Faulkner

by Diana Fox

 

Faulkner, Norman.  Goin down slow (1980) (an early work from the studio at ACAD). (Photo Courtesy of Norman Faulkner)

Faulkner, Norman. Goin down slow (1980) (an early work from the studio at ACAD). (Photo Courtesy of Norman Faulkner)

 

Despite having such an impact on the Canadian glass community, Norman Faulkner manages to keep a relatively low profile.  Researching him is not easy – there is little written about him, and what does exist is brief at best.  It is easy to understand why, when we finally do sit down and the first thing he says is that he wants to talk me out of writing about him altogether.  While Norm downplays his contributions to the glass community, they are certainly worth celebrating. It is virtually impossible to sum up his accomplishments in just a few hundred words, and even more difficult to determine where to start.  As an educator, Norm was instrumental in developing the glass department at ACAD.  As a filmmaker, Norm documented glassblowing in India and Syria, capturing images that would be difficult, if not impossible, to gather today.  As a curator, he has been at the helm of numerous exhibitions, highlighting the best in glass art.  As an artist, Norm created fascinating artwork, challenging the notions of what glass and glass art can be.  Ultimately, it is best to begin at the beginning, and examine just how Norm found himself working with glass in the first place.

 

Norm grew up in Edmonton and majored in science in university, but, by his own admission, realized it was a “big mistake,” and quit.  “But everything that happened after that dragged me into this life of, you know, parties and music and art.  I worked at the library and a couple of people there were from the art college, and so I gradually fell into this whole other world.  And so when I went and took science it didn’t make sense to me at all, so I spent part of a year just hanging out with people in fine arts…  I got married and went to Montreal for a year and then Europe for a year, maybe less, but I was drawing more and more, and I got this job in Montreal where I wound up doing some design work, and I was putting together a catalogue and doing layout and paste stuff and designing labels for speakers and whatnot, and I thought well this is okay, I could do this, so I came to school (ACAD) to take advertising art,” said Norm.

 

He took an introductory class, and “hated everything about it … by then the head of the school characterized me as being on the fringe of the hippie community, but it was assumed that I’d go into painting, and I had a couple of good friends who were in ceramics, and just before I had to decide [my major] I went to see… a movie called Alice’s Restaurant … based on a song by Arlo Guthrie … and in this movie he goes and visits this Japanese woman whose a potter, and when he visits her she’s firing a kiln, a wood kiln, and I said ‘I’m gonna do ceramics!’  But it was because of the fire.”

 

After his third year he accepted a temporary position as a Ceramics Technician at Sheridan College.  Norm was interested in glass, but hadn’t had any exposure to it yet. “Craft Horizons was the magazine of the age, and they talked about glass from time to time, and I was curious about it.”  Being at Sheridan gave him the opportunity to see it first-hand (their glass studio had recently opened), but by no means did it spark his interest.

 

“I looked into the glass department, and they were making such pathetic, awful stuff… goblets and vases, and I was more interested in sculpture at the time, and I looked in and thought, well, there’s not much there.  But I got to be pretty good friends with one of the guys who was a glass student.”

 

That student was the late Clark Guettel, and their friendship would be pivotal in Norm’s life.  “I always talked about Clark as being like the dope peddler who gives you your first hit free, right?  And then starts charging.  Because that was all … it kind of took”. As the end of his contract was approaching, Norm was offered an extension, but “they were asking for my student loan to be repaid after a year, so I thought, well… maybe I’ll go back to school and put that off for a while.  And so Clark said, ‘you’re not leaving here without blowing a piece of glass.’  So he took me in the glass studio, and walked me through making a piece of glass.”

 

By his own description, Norm’s first glass piece “was the dopiest little, tiny little, bottle, crooked, stuff you ever saw.”  But now he was interested.  Norm completed his ceramics diploma, and returned to Sheridan to take a summer glass workshop with Mark Peiser.  The summer following, Norm again returned to Sheridan, this time as Clark’s technician, because Clark was teaching the summer workshop. When Norm returned to Calgary, he started building his own glass studio.

 

Faulkner, Norman.  Some of Norm’s glass pieces from Mark Peiser’s 1972 workshop at Sheridan.  (Photo courtesy of Norman Faulkner)

Faulkner, Norman. Some of Norm’s glass pieces from Mark Peiser’s 1972 workshop at Sheridan. (Photo courtesy of Norman Faulkner)

 

At that point, there were no hard and fast rules on building a glass studio, and Norm drew on his knowledge of ceramics and Clark’s advice to get started.  “I knew about kilns and brick, and when I’d worked at Sheridan I’d built a bunch of burners for their kilns, and I knew how to put stuff together, and I’m kind of mechanically capable.  So the glass technology part of it … I kind of basically learned from Clark, at that initial level.  I’d helped him build his furnace.  He was really instrumental in my whole glass end, he’s my … primary teacher.  You know, he got me into glass, I learned a lot about making glass, and a lot about people, and a lot about technical stuff like, with Clark … we became pretty good buddies.”

 

Norman Faulkner and Glen Yank, standing in front of Norm’s first furnace, built for a workshop at the Banff Centre. (Photo courtesy of Norman Faulkner)

Norman Faulkner and Glen Yank, standing in front of Norm’s first furnace, built for a workshop at the Banff Centre. (Photo courtesy of Norman Faulkner)

 

Norm’s first glass studio was not built in his own garage, but his neighbour’s.  “He let me use his garage because he had a van, and he couldn’t get it in without breaking his mirrors off.  It was a small garage,” he says with a laugh. “But I built my studio in there, and I was teaching night classes in ceramics.  And that was kind of my income, and blowing glass.  And I started making stuff and selling it.  So my first stuff of course, I mean, if you look at glass from the 60s, it’s not very sophisticated.”

 

Lack of sophistication notwithstanding, his early work is by no means worth being dismissed, particularly when considered in the context of the inspiration it would serve for others in the future.

 

Diana Fox graduated from the ACAD glass department in 2010, and has been the Social Media Coordinator for GAAC since that year.

 

 

 

Atelier précurseur au Canada

Conversation avec Norman Faulkner

par Diana Fox

 

Faulkner, Norman.  Goin down slow (1980) (une des premières œuvres réalisée à l’atelier de l’ACAD). (Photo fournie par Norman Faulkner)

Faulkner, Norman. Goin down slow (1980) (une des premières œuvres réalisée à l’atelier de l’ACAD). (Photo fournie par Norman Faulkner)

 

Malgré son importance dans la communauté du verre du Canada, Norman Faulkner s’est toujours fait discret. Faire des recherches à son sujet n’est pas chose facile, il y a peu d’articles le concernant et ces derniers sont souvent succincts. En le rencontrant, je comprends mieux la raison car il tente dès le début de me dissuader d’écrire à son sujet. Alors que Norm minimise sa contribution à la communauté du verre, elle vaut pourtant le coup d’être regardée de plus près. Il est presque impossible de résumer son œuvre en une centaine de mots et encore plus difficile de décider par où commencer. En tant qu’enseignant, Norm a joué un grand rôle dans le développement du programme verre de l’ACAD. En tant que réalisateur de films, Norm a fait des documentaires sur le soufflage du verre en Inde et en Syrie et a capturé des images qu’il serait aujourd’hui impossible de filmer. En tant que commissaire, il a été à la tête de nombreuses expositions, soulignant le meilleur de l’art du verre. En tant qu’artiste, Norm a réalisé des œuvres fascinantes, défiant les notions habituelles en termes de verre et d’art. Au final, mieux vaut commencer par le commencement pour comprendre de quelle façon Norm a découvert l’art du verre au départ.

 

Norm a grandi à Edmonton et suivait des études scientifique à l’université jusqu’à ce qu’il réalise que c’était “une erreur” et décide d’abandonner. « Chaque événement après cela m’a conduit à cette nouvelle vie festive faite de musique et d’art. En travaillant à la bibliothèque, j’ai rencontré plusieurs personnes qui étudiaient l’art et j’ai progressivement basculé vers ce tout autre univers. Plus j’allais en cours de science, moins cela n’avait de sens pour moi, alors j’ai passé une partie de l’année à fréquenter les étudiants en art… Je me suis marié et je suis parti vivre un an à Montréal, puis en Europe pendant un peu moins d’une année. Je me plaisais à dessiner et j’ai fini par trouver un travail à Montréal où j’effectuais divers travaux de design, d’agencement de catalogues,  de mises en page, de création de logos, etc. Comme ça m’avait plu,  je me suis dit que je pourrais faire ce métier et je me suis inscrit à l’ACAD pour étudier l’art de la publicité » nous explique Norm.

 

Norm a détesté le cours d’introduction.  « Depuis ce moment-là, le directeur de l’école m’ considéré comme un marginal de la communauté hippie et se disait d’avance que j’allais choisir l’option peinture au final. Juste avant de choisir mon option,  j’ai été voir un film avec plusieurs de mes amis avaient pris l’option céramique. Le film s’intitulait Alice’s Restaurant…basé sur une chanson d’Arlo Guthrie… et dans ce film le personnage se rend chez une femme japonaise qui est potière. Au moment où il entre chez elle, elle est en train d’allumer un four à bois. A cet instant je me suis dit : je vais faire de la poterie ! C’était principalement à cause du feu en fait. »

 

Au bout de la troisième année d’étude, il a trouvé un poste temporaire en tant que technicien céramique au College Sheridan. Norm s’intéressait au verre, mais n’y avait jamais touché. « A cette époque il y avait le magazine Craft Horizons qui en parlait de temps à autre, et cela suscitait en moi une certaine curiosité ». Le poste à Sheridan lui a donné l’opportunité de voir l’atelier de verre qui venait juste d’ouvrir, mais cela n’a pas généré d’intérêt particulier.

 

« En regardant le département verre, je trouvais qu’ils faisaient des pièces tellement pathétiques, des vases et des gobelets horribles…, je préférais plutôt la sculpture à cette période. J’ai réfléchis et je me suis dit, bof, il n’y a pas grand-chose à faire là-dedans. Mais j’ai sympathisé avec un des étudiants du programme verre. »

 

Cet étudiant-là était le regretté Clark Guettel et leur amitié a été un tournant dans la vie de Norm. « Je me suis toujours plu à dire que Clark était comme un genre de dealer. Celui qui te laisse prendre la première bouffée gratuitement et puis te facture le reste ensuite. C’est tout ce qu’il a suffi en quelque sorte ».  Comme la fin de son contrat approchait, on proposa à Norm de le prolonger mais « il fallait rembourser mon prêt étudiant l’année suivante, donc je me suis dit…peut être que je devrais retourner finir des études d’abord  et mettre cela de côté pour plus tard. Clark m’a alors dit, « Tu ne pars pas d’ici sans avoir soufflé un morceau de verre ». Il m’a emmené à l’atelier et m’a guidé dans la création d’une pièce en verre.  Norm décrit lui-même cette première pièce en verre comme «  la plus petite bouteille tordue et minable que vous n’ayez jamais vue ». Mais à présent il était conquis. Norm acheva ses études en céramique et retourna à Sheridan pour faire une session d’été en atelier de soufflage avec Mark Peiser. L’été suivant, Norm retourna à Sheridan, cette fois en tant que technicien de Clark, car Clark enseignait l’atelier d’été.  Une fois de retour à Calgary, Norm a commencé à bâtir son atelier.

 

Faulkner, Norman.  Quelques une des pièces de verre de Norm durant le séminaire de Mark Peiser en 1972 à Sheridan.  (photo fournie par Norman Faulkner)

Faulkner, Norman. Quelques une des pièces de verre de Norm durant le séminaire de Mark Peiser en 1972 à Sheridan. (photo fournie par Norman Faulkner)

 

A cette époque, il n’existait aucune régulation précise pour la construction d’un atelier de soufflage et Norm s’est basé sur ses propres connaissances en céramique et sur les conseils de Clark pour débuter. « Je possédais des connaissances sur les fours et les briques et j’avais construit plusieurs bruleurs pour leurs fours du temps où je travaillais à Sheridan. Je savais donc assembler le matériel et je m’en sors plutôt bien en mécanique, donc à ce stade Clark m’a instruit sur la partie technique spécifique au verre. Je l’avais aidé à construire son arche. Il a été crucial dans mon parcours verre, il  est mon premier initiateur. Vous savez, c’est lui qui m’a mené au verre. J’ai beaucoup appris sur la pratique du verre, sur les gens et sur la technique avec Clark, nous sommes devenus de bons amis ».

 

Norman Faulkner et Glen Yank posant devant le premier four de Norm construit pour un atelier au Banff Centre. (Photo fournie par Norman Faulkner)

Norman Faulkner et Glen Yank posant devant le premier four de Norm construit pour un atelier au Banff Centre. (Photo fournie par Norman Faulkner)

 

Norm n’a pas construit son premier atelier dans son garage mais dans celui de son voisin. « Il m’a laissé utiliser son garage parce qu’il conduisait une camionnette et qu’il ne pouvait pas la rentrer sans casser ses rétroviseurs. C’était un petit garage » nous dit-il en riant. « Lorsque j’ai établi mon atelier dedans, j’enseignais des cours du soir en céramique. C’était mon revenu, avec le soufflage de verre. Puis j’ai commencé à réaliser des pièces et à les vendre. Bien sûr, en regardant le verre des années 60, mes premières œuvres n’étaient pas très complexes. » Malgré ce manque de complexité, ses premières pièces ne sont en aucun cas négligeables, en particulier si l’on considère ce à quoi cela l’a amené par la suite.

 

Diana Fox a obtenu son diplôme du département verre de l’ACAD en 2010 et tient le rôle de coordinatrice des réseaux sociaux pour la GAAC depuis ce temps.

 

Share

Glassblowing and Meditation – Wisdom from Norman Faulkner

by Diana Fox

 

Image Courtesy of Norman Faulkner

Image Courtesy of Norman Faulkner

 

One of my favorite questions I ask during monthly GAAC member interviews is one that pertains to what lessons people have learned from glass.  The nature of glass seems to lend itself to a myriad of ‘aha!’ moments, both artistically and with life in general.  When I recently sat down to talk to Norman Faulkner, I was aware of his practice of meditation, and curious if he found any correlation between it and the act of blowing glass, and if so what that looked like:

 

“One of the first aspects of meditation is what is called Samadhi, which is just a poly word for like, focus and concentration.  And developing that focus and concentration is a really important step to enlightenment.  You have to get that before you can continue to progress on the path.  And I think that working with hot glass has a lot of parallels to developing Samadhi, because really, it’s the ability to focus and not be distracted by … all the other stuff that your mind wants to do. They call it ‘monkey mind,’  and it happens with glass.

 

“Now, I don’t know if the Buddha ever made that analogy, but our teacher talks about the idea of focus of a certain kind.  Like there’s a spiritual way to focus and then there’s focus that a cat has when he’s waiting for a mouse, and our teacher talks about the circus girl walking the tightrope.  And he talks about that as being Samadhi, but it’s not the specific kind of Samadhi that will lead you to the spiritual awakening.  But it’s related enough that the idea of developing Samadhi is absolutely no mystery to someone who’s blown glass.  And it does require focus … if you blow glass, I think, I know – I think I know – your brain wave pattern adapts to it.  Like they’ve done work with people that play video games, and there’s certain brainwave patterns, and that happens with glass.  It just does.

 

“And so, you could easily say that blowing glass in fact is … a form of meditation.  And at that level … when you get to the point where you’re working without consciously making every muscle move the way that it has to move, and you’re just doing it, I think you come to a state where you have affected a change in the way you approach life … and I think people have some kind of, maybe measurable, change in how they approach [their work]. “

 

I ask Norm if he thinks meditation has changed him.

 

“I do, yeah.  But taking it a step further, like the first time I went and did a ten day meditation, I noticed a bigger change.  Because I became less reactive … I sailed through life on a smoother ocean, with occasional squalls.  It did help.  But I think blowing glass moves you part of a step in that direction.”

 

Diana Fox is a glass artist who graduated from the Alberta College of Art + Design in 2010.  She has been the Social Media Coordinator for GAAC since that same year.

 

 

 

La sagesse de Norman Faulkner

par Diana Fox

 

Image fournie par Norman Faulkner

Image fournie par Norman Faulkner

 

Lors de mes interviews mensuelles des membres de la GAAC, l’une de mes questions préférées est de leur demander ce que le verre leur a apporté. La nature du verre semble se prêter à des moments de « aha ! », à la fois artistiquement parlant et dans la vie en général. Lorsque j’ai récemment rencontré Norman Faulkner, je savais qu’il pratiquait la méditation et j’étais curieuse de savoir s’il pouvait établir un lien avec l’acte de souffler, si oui de quelle façon :

 

« L’un des premiers aspects de la médiation est ce que l’on appelle Samadhi, ce qui est simplement un mot pour décrire la concentration. Et développer cette concentration est essentiel pour parvenir à la spiritualité. Vous devez y arriver avant de pouvoir aborder la suite. Et je pense que le travail du verre à chaud a beaucoup de similitudes avec Samadhi, car cela demande des grandes capacités de  concentration sans se laisser distraire par toutes les autres choses auxquelles votre esprit pense. Ils appellent cela ‘la cervelle de singe’, et cela arrive aussi dans le verre.

 

« J’ignore si Buddha avait déjà fait des comparaisons, mais notre instructeur lui nous parle de cette notion de focalisation. Tout comme il existe une façon spirituelle de se focaliser, ou bien la concentration du chat lorsqu’il traque une souris, notre professeur fait allusion à l’équilibriste dans le cirque marchant sur une corde.  Pour lui c’est cela  Samadhi.  Mais qu’importe quelle vision du Samadhi pour atteindre la spiritualité. Il est clair que cette notion de Samadhi parle d’elle-même pour quelqu’un qui a déjà soufflé du verre. Lorsque vous soufflez du verre, cela requiert beaucoup de concentration. Je crois savoir que votre cerveau s’adapte en conséquence. Il y a eu des études faites sur les personnes qui jouent aux jeux vidéo pour démontrer les schémas automatiques qui se créent dans le cerveau, et cela se passe aussi dans le cas du soufflage du verre. »

 

«  Il serait facile de prétendre que souffler le verre est aussi une forme de méditation. Quand vous en êtes au stade où dans la pratique vous ne faites plus de manière consciente tous les gestes techniques car ils se font naturellement, vous avez atteint ce stade de changement dans votre conception de la vie. Je crois que les personnes ont aussi cette capacité presque mesurable de changer leur perception du travail. »

 

Je demande à Norm s’il pense que la méditation a changé sa perception :

 

« Oui je le crois. Mais on peut aller plus loin, comme la première fois où j’ai participé à un séminaire de méditation de 10 jours, j’ai remarqué des changements plus grands. Je suis devenu moins réactif, j’ai vogué sur un océan plus calme avec  des bourrasques de temps à autre. Cela m’a aidé. Je pense qu’en soufflant du verre, cela vous mène vers cette même direction. »

 

Diana Fox a obtenu son diplôme du département verre de l’ACAD en 2010 et tient le rôle de coordinatrice des réseaux sociaux pour la GAAC depuis ce temps.

Share
//