President’s Message

June 22, 2015

Hooray!!! The education issue!

by Steven Tippin

 

Steven Tippin hamming it up in his last year at Sheridan College. Photo credit: Kate Tippin

Steven Tippin hamming it up in his last year at Sheridan College. Photo credit: Kate Tippin

 

As some of you know, the education issue of our magazine is near and dear to my heart. I love seeing all that the new generation has to offer and I often find myself inspired by the work presented. It is my favourite issue. Please enjoy it with me.

 

This year’s issue is even more precious to me as it marks the end of my first year as the kiln-formed glass instructor at Sheridan College. This role has allowed me to be right there as many of the graduates from Sheridan developed and finalized their new work. I have seen ideas evolve, change and develop. I have seen technical ability be tested and proven and I have even been lucky enough to be able to offer solutions for technical, aesthetical or conceptual problems along the way. I have seen the entire spectrum of reactions to their works as they emerged from the kiln, ranging for complete joy to utter devastation. I was often direct witness to these reactions, whether in person, in conversation or in text message form (some even in the middle of the night).

All of this reminds me of when I was a student and how proud I felt as I raced towards the end of a huge accomplishment, finishing off my college career and the scary emergence as a “professional” artist. It was a huge shift that almost overshadowed the feeling of pride in a job well done. It almost seemed too huge.

 

I want to take this opportunity to remind the graduates from all the glass programs to take some well-deserved (and perhaps slightly selfish) time to celebrate what they accomplished and the credentials that they have received. It was an uphill battle from the beginning, but somehow, through all the trials and challenges, you emerged victorious (even if slightly damaged – tee hee). All of this is due to the intense dedication and hard work that you have poured into your education, your work and yourself.

 

I welcome you all to the world of professional artists and please accept my overwhelmingly proud, “congratulations,” as you become part of a fantastic community of artists. Many of us have been exactly where you are now and know how it feels. You have the rest of your career to try new things and develop in new ways. So what’s next for you?

 

 

Le mot du président

Enfin, le numéro consacré à  l’enseignement!!

par Steven Tippin

 

Steven Tippin au cours de sa dernière année au Sheridan College. Crédit Photo: Kate Tippin

Steven Tippin au cours de sa dernière année au Sheridan College. Crédit Photo: Kate Tippin

 

Comme vous le savez surement, le numéro de notre magazine qui porte sur l’enseignement est cher à mes yeux. J’adore contempler tout ce que la nouvelle génération peut nous offrir et je suis souvent inspiré par les œuvres qui nous sont présentées. Appréciez donc en ma compagnie.

 

Le numéro de cette année est d’autant plus important qu’il marque la fin de ma première année en tant qu’enseignant en pâte de verre au Sheridan College. Ce rôle m’a permis d’être présent au moment précis où les étudiants de Sheridan ont développé et achevé leur projet de fin d’année. J’ai pu voir les concepts peu à peu évoluer, changer et se réaliser. J’ai vu des prouesses techniques être testées et démontrées et j’ai même eu la chance de pouvoir proposer des solutions aux problématiques techniques, esthétiques ou conceptuelles qui se sont posées. J’ai vu tout un panel de réactions au moment où les œuvres sortaient du four, allant de la joie ultime à la déception totale. J’étais souvent témoin direct de ces réactions, que ce soit face à la personne,  dans une discussion ou par message téléphonique (certains parfois même au beau milieu de la nuit).

Tout cela me rappelle le temps où j’étais moi-même étudiant et la façon dont j’étais fier  à l’approche de la fin mes études, tout en étant pétrifié par mes débuts en tant qu’artiste « professionnel ». C’était un énorme changement qui a presque fait chavirer la satisfaction d’avoir réussi mes études. Cela me semblait presque insurmontable.

 

Je veux profiter de cette occasion pour rappeler à tous les étudiants diplômés des programmes verre,  de surtout prendre ce temps bien mérité pour fêter cet accomplissement et ce diplôme.  Dès le début, il a été question de vaincre à travers tous les essais et défis et vous en êtes ressortis vainqueurs (même si vous n’êtes pas tout à fait indemnes, héhé). Tout cela est le résultat d’une dévotion immense et de l’effort constant qui a été fourni au cours de vos études dans votre travail.

 

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue dans le monde des artistes professionnels et je vous prie d’accepter mes félicitations sincères, tandis que vous entrez dans notre merveilleuse communauté d’artistes. Beaucoup d’entre nous sommes passés par cette même étape et savons ce que vous ressentez. Vous avez à présent le reste de votre carrière pour tenter de nouvelles choses et évoluer de différentes façons. Alors, vers où se diriger à présent ?

 

 

Share

ACAD Graduating Class 2015

What is it that draws us to Glass?

by Melony Stieben

 

 

What is it that draws us to glass? 

 

This material, which we cannot touch when working in the hotshop, requires constant attention and focus from start-to-finish. It cracks or explodes when we do not give it enough reassurance of its true beauty through reheats in the gloryhole. It burns us when we get too close or are not properly shielded from the immense heat that radiates from its surface. It can be the most violent or the most sensual material to work with, depending on how we treat it.

 

To truly understand glass, you need years-upon-years of working with it. On the other hand, I have met multiple artists, who have worked with hot glass for over 25 years, and are still discovering new things about the material. Can you ever really understand it fully? No matter how long you stay in a relationship with it, can you ever know it intimately?

 

Truly that is what working with glass becomes. It is a give-and-take relationship, full of excitement, discovery and curiosity, as well as heartbreak and tears. The more you are willing to give your time and effort to the glass, the more it will reward you.  These rewards come in the form of stunning creations, nourished from molten glass in the furnace, hot-sculpted work or tight-lined functional objects or even a flowing abstraction, reminiscent of life forces.

 

Glass becomes this material that we love, always enticing us to make more. It teaches us to let go of our attachment to a piece before it is finished (we succeed at this detachment some times more than others). Glass pushes us to improve our skills and work with others, taking joy in their successes as much as our own.

 

Glass creates a community. It brings us together through our love of the material. This love for glass drew us together as a class. We all shared our own versions of curiosity and had the opportunity to grow together. We were not only learning from our instructors, we were learning from each other’s experimentations and explorations.  Each of the five students, graduating from the Alberta College of Art + Design’s Glass major, has their own distinct and different voice. We have grown into a tight-knit group through the years of mug and Christmas bauble production nights, Glass Olympics and our trip to Chicago for the 2014 GAS Conference. ACAD has not only given us Bachelors of Fine Arts in Glass but also, more importantly, lifelong friendships.

 

I want to present you with the wonderful people that I had the pleasure of learning alongside for the duration of my degree:

 

Graeme Dearden

 

Dearden, Graeme. Crash (2015), silkscreen print on paper, 21” x 29” (Graeme Dearden)

Dearden, Graeme. Crash (2015), silkscreen print on paper, 21” x 29” (Graeme Dearden)

 

What do you make?

Abstract prints and drawings. Visual poetry. Prose poetry.

What do you make work about?

Well, the through-line of my work is usually the object-making process. I’m intrigued with why people, including myself, make objects and how the methods they use convey their personal history. This gets me thinking a lot about labour and craft and how these fields offer unique answers to why people produce both utilitarian objects and art objects.

Why is this at all important to you?

I see it as a way of distilling at least part of a person’s subjective experience into tangible conversations. It’s like listening to an interview. You learn about a person through their responses to external stimuli. Except, instead of a person asking questions, it’s a material asking questions. And materials ask different questions than people.

What do you intend for the viewer to get from the work you make?

I don’t feel I have enough control over who views my work and in what context, to attempt to control anyone’s reading of my work. I try to leave hypotheses about my work’s reception removed from the decision-making process as much as possible.

But, you still do think about the viewer to some extent?

Of course I do. I can’t imagine making work in which I wouldn’t do that. I guess what I mean is that I don’t trust myself to correctly anticipate people’s responses. The only response I can seem to correctly anticipate is my own. So that is the logic I rely on when I produce my art.

If the work doesn’t anticipate anything in specific from the viewer though, why do you show it?

I like to see how my personal experience making artwork is received when presented outside of the context of my studio and the time spent creating. I see my personal experience like a tool, it shapes and alters the final object without ever actually showing itself explicitly.

Could you describe what process you go through to make your work?

I work very heavily in printmaking and glass coldworking, but I see both as an expression of drawing. It’s the root of everything I make. I have been writing a lot as well, but even that I see as related to drawing. Every letter is a tiny drawing and has its own signature to it, which I get a kick out of. Even as I move into non-handwritten writing, I try to treat words and phrases like objects with specific qualities, just like prints and drawings and glass.

 

 

Ryan Gaudreault

 

Gaudreault, Ryan. Untitled (2015), Blown Glass, 11” x 12” (Ryan Gaudreault)

Gaudreault, Ryan. Untitled (2015), Blown Glass, 11” x 12” (Ryan Gaudreault)

 

Glass, as a material, has always allowed me to explore my fascination of the ocean and aquatic life easily because [glass] has qualities of those like water.  My work is inspired by the human connection with the ocean and nature. Much of my work is functional, using forms and patterns for Mother Nature. The material also gives me a voice to speak, like a painter communicating through their painting. Glass can also become a nonfunctional piece of artwork [with its] qualities, like using light and transparent colours to magnify the fluidity of the glass. I want my pieces to give the viewer a calm, almost meditative, feeling when viewing and using the work.

 

 

Leah Kudel

 

Kudel, Leah. A Moment of Negative Space (2013), Blown Glass (Joe Kelly)

Kudel, Leah. A Moment of Negative Space (2013), Blown Glass (Joe Kelly)

 

Kudel, Leah. The Space between Myself and I (2013), Blown Glass (Joe Kelly)

Kudel, Leah. The Space between Myself and I (2013), Blown Glass (Joe Kelly)

 

My art practice revolves around the idea of absence, specifically negative space. I am fascinated by how the absence of something becomes highlighted solely because of the fact that something or someone no longer exists. The absence, in a sense, materializes. I love attempting to highlight the negative spaces between people through the use of objects that initiate uncanny social interactions.

 

 

Lusia Stetkiewicz

 

Stetkiewicz, Lusia. Aware (2015), Blown Glass and Electronics, Dimensions Variable (Lusia Stetkiewicz)

Stetkiewicz, Lusia. Aware (2015), Blown Glass and Electronics, Dimensions Variable (Lusia Stetkiewicz)

 

Stetkiewicz, Lusia. Aware (2015), Blown Glass and Electronics, Dimensions Variable (Lusia Stetkiewicz)

Stetkiewicz, Lusia. Aware (2015), Blown Glass and Electronics, Dimensions Variable (Lusia Stetkiewicz)

 

Light, dark, vulnerability, time and the communication of these themes is the basis in which I produce work. These elements are all present in one way or another in day-to-day life, but can go unrecognized and unidentified, becoming normal or disregarded in our daily existence.  In my work, I expose these elements while I explore the outer physical landscape, our environment, and how it impacts our inner landscape.

Lightness and darkness can speak to a duality of good and bad and to the physical experience of light and shadow. I am fascinated by the experience of light and dark. I believe that the root of this fascination has emerged from growing up 25 km outside of Whitehorse, Yukon. Whitehorse is north of the 60th parallel, [so] it has summers that have almost twenty-four hour daylight and winters with nearly the exact opposite. With winter being about ten months of the year, ice, snow, cold, dark, muffled sounds and the sense of isolation these elements create has formed who I am. My life in this climate has created in me a sense of vulnerability and sensitivity that I believe is now intrinsic to my being. I am interested in this feeling of vulnerability and the fluidity of its different manifestations, both private and public.  With vulnerability comes almost total self-awareness [and] an acute awareness of life beyond oneself. The foundation for my art practice lies in this self-awareness, both in myself and in others and in relation to others. I strive to physically bring out the emotionality of the environment: the sounds, the light and the dark. I am interested in how the darkness folds in on us and how the light is relentless and is manic, both are inescapable. My work explores how our inner and outer landscapes both create and influence us.

Though the roots of my interests are melancholy in nature, I am optimistic and engaged with the light, playful, curious side of the world as well. This sense of lightness emerges from the Yukon summers, [with] 24 hours of daylight.  I make art, which simultaneously engages with the way that I/we see the world with playful curiosity, often turning my, and the audiences’, expectations of what we see upside-down.  I want to embrace a playful sadness in my art, as I feel I do in my life.

Although my work is constantly changing and evolving, my roots will forever stay the same. The experiences that I have had, the vulnerability that I have felt and the interest that I have in the world around me is constant. I am always searching for different ways to communicate and change the experience that the viewer has with a piece of work, to emulate natural occurrences that cause us to be reminded of experiences past and to become present in the current moment. Operating in dualities of warmth and cold, light and dark, playfulness and sadness, community and solitude, my interest in the world around me translates into work that is experiential and curious in nature. My work aims to change the way that the viewer perceives and experiences the work, materiality and space around them, intending to engage on many levels and [with] many senses. My goal is to make work that acts as a catalyst for thought rather than merely presenting a physical or material representation.

 

Melony Stieben

 

Stieben, Melony. Contained (2014), Blown and Engraved Glass, 14” x 5 ½” (largest) (Melony Stieben)

Stieben, Melony. Contained (2014), Blown and Engraved Glass, 14” x 5 ½” (largest) (Melony Stieben)

 

Stieben, Melony. Exploration of Line (2015), Blown Glass with Cane and Murrine, 24” x 5 ½ “ (Tallest) (Melony Stieben)

Stieben, Melony. Exploration of Line (2015), Blown Glass with Cane and Murrine, 24” x 5 ½ “ (Tallest) (Melony Stieben)

 

From an unquenchable thirst for life to explore, discover and learn, I draw inspiration to create from the patterns I find around me and from ones I discover through research into microscopic images captured by scientific researchers.

I am looking at the connections between macro and micro images in life and how textures and patterns repeat or resemble one another on multiple levels upon closer inspection. Using glass as my medium, I am exploring different ways of expressing how I see these images.

 

Melony Stieben was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, but grew up in northern Alberta from a young age. She graduated from the Alberta College of Art + Design with a Bachelor of Art in Glass with Distinction in 2015. She blows and casts glass as part of her practice, which looks at the line that creates the pattern.

 

 

La promotion 2015 de l’ACAD

Pourquoi le verre nous attire?

par Melony Stieben

 

 

Pourquoi le verre nous attire?

 

Tant qu’on est en train de le travailler dans l’atelier, on ne peut toucher ce matériau qui demande une attention constante et de la précision du début à la fin. Il explose ou se craquèle dès qu’on ne prête pas suffisamment attention à sa vraie beauté sortie brulante du creuset. Il brule lorsqu’on s’approche trop de lui ou que l’on n’est pas suffisamment protégé de l’immense chaleur qui dégage de sa surface. Il peut être le matériau le plus violent comme le plus sensuel, selon la façon dont il est traité.

 

Bien comprendre le verre requiert de nombreuses années de travail avec. Pourtant, j’ai rencontré des artistes travaillant le verre depuis plus de 25 ans, qui découvrent encore maintenant des choses nouvelles. Peut-on jamais le comprendre totalement ? Qu’importe la durée de votre relation  avec le verre, pouvez-vous vraiment le connaître parfaitement?

 

Travailler avec le verre implique réellement cela. C’est une relation donnant-donnant, pleine de joies, de découvertes et de curiosités, mais aussi de déceptions et de larmes. Plus vous lui consacrez de temps, plus il vous le rendra. En récompense, on obtient des créations magnifiques qui prennent forme à partir du verre en fusion sortant du four, de la sculpture à chaud, d’objets domestiques aux lignes précises et de gracieuses réalisations abstraites évoquant les pouvoirs de la vie.

 

Le verre devient alors un matériau tant apprécié qu’il nous attire toujours plus. Il nous apprend à laisser tomber certaines œuvres inachevées (ce détachement est parfois plus facile que pour d’autres). Le verre nous pousse à améliorer nos compétences et à travailler avec d’autres personnes, à se réjouir de leur réussite autant que de la nôtre.

 

Le verre génère une communauté. Il nous rassemble au travers de notre amour pour le matériau. Cet amour du verre nous a rapprochés pendant les cours. Nous avons tous cette curiosité distincte en commun  et avons progressé ensemble. Nous avons appris, non seulement grâce à nos professeurs, mais aussi par les découvertes de chacun.  Les 5 étudiants qui viennent d’obtenir leur diplôme de l’Alberta College of Art + Design avec option verre ont chacun leurs propres spécificités et une voie distincte. Nous avons évolué au fil des années au sein de ce petit groupe : les nuits entières à produire des tasses et des boules de noël, les olympiques du verre, notre voyage à Chicago pour assister à la Conférence du GAS de 2014. L’ACAD ne nous a pas seulement donné un diplôme des Beaux-Arts en verre, il nous a surtout permis de créer des amitiés pour la vie.

 

Je souhaite vous présenter les fabuleuses personnes aux côtés desquelles j’ai eu le plaisir d’apprendre tout au long de mes études.

 

Graeme Dearden

 

Dearden, Graeme. Crash (2015), impression sérigraphie sur papier, 21” x 29” (Graeme Dearden)

Dearden, Graeme. Crash (2015), impression sérigraphie sur papier, 21” x 29” (Graeme Dearden)

 

Que fais-tu?

Des impressions abstraites et des dessins. De la poésie visuelle. De la poésie en prose.

Sur quoi porte ton travail?

Et bien la ligne directrice de mon travail porte en général sur le procédé de création de l’objet. Je m’interroge sur la façon dont  nous concevons ces objets et comment les méthodes utilisées expriment notre histoire personnelle. Cela me mène à une réflexion sur le travail et l’art, la manière dont ces domaines offrent une réponse unique qui permet de produire à la fois des objets fonctionnels et des objets d’art.

Pourquoi cela est-il important à tes yeux?

Je considère que c’est une façon de distiller une partie au moins de son expérience subjective dans une discussion concrète, un peu comme si vous écoutiez l’interview de quelqu’un. Vous découvrez la personne au travers de ses réponses à des stimuli extérieurs. Mais au lieu de répondre à un interviewer, le matériau vous pose ses propres questions. Elles sont différentes de celles posées par des personnes.

Que souhaites-tu communiquer à l’observateur dans les œuvres que tu crées?

Je ne pense pas pouvoir influencer  la lecture de mes œuvres car je ne sais pas toujours qui sont les personnes qui regardent mes œuvres ni dans quel contexte. J’essaye autant que possible de ne pas prendre en compte dans mon processus de décision les hypothèses de perception de mon travail.

Penses-tu malgré tout à l’observateur d’une certaine façon?

Bien sûr que j’y pense. Je ne me souviens pas de travaux pour lesquels je n’y ai pas pensé. Ce que je veux dire en fait, c’est que je ne me crois pas apte à anticiper correctement les réponses des gens. La seule réponse que je peux correctement anticiper est la mienne. C’est donc sur cette logique que je me base lorsque je crée une pièce.

Si ton travail n’anticipe rien de particulier du point de vue de l’observateur, alors pourquoi l’exposes-tu quand même? 

J’aime voir de quelle façon mon expérience personnelle dans la création d’œuvres est perçue en dehors de l’atelier et sortie de son contexte. Je considère mon expérience personnelle comme un outil, elle façonne et modifie l’objet final sans jamais vraiment transparaitre explicitement.

Peux-tu décrire le processus que tu appliques dans ton travail?

Je travaille beaucoup en impression et dans le travail à froid du verre, mais je considère les deux comme une expression du dessin. C’est la base de tout ce que je crée. J’ai aussi beaucoup écrit, et cela est également lié au dessin selon moi. Chaque lettre est un petit dessin et possède sa propre signature, ce qui me plait vraiment. Même dans les écritures non manuscrites, j’essaye de traiter les mots et les phrases comme des objets aux qualités particulières, tout comme les impressions, les dessins et le verre.

 

 

Ryan Gaudreault

 

Gaudreault, Ryan. Sans titre (2015), verre soufflé, 11” x 12” (Ryan Gaudreault)

Gaudreault, Ryan. Sans titre (2015), verre soufflé, 11” x 12” (Ryan Gaudreault)

 

Le matériau du verre me permet d’explorer facilement ma fascination pour l’océan et la vie aquatique, car il possède des qualités semblables à celles de l’eau. Mon travail s’inspire du lien entre l’homme, l’océan et la nature. La majorité de mon travail est destiné à un usage fonctionnel, j’utilise des formes et des modèles de la nature. Grâce au matériau je peux m’exprimer, à l’image d’un peintre qui communique au travers de ses peintures. Le verre est aussi propice à la réalisation d’œuvres d’art non fonctionnelles, en utilisant des couleurs légères et transparentes pour magnifier la fluidité du verre. Au travers de mes pièces, mon but est de procurer une sensation de calme presque méditatif à la vue ou à l’utilisation de mes objets.

 

 

Leah Kudel

 

Kudel, Leah. A Moment of Negative Space (2013), verre soufflé (Joe Kelly)

Kudel, Leah. A Moment of Negative Space (2013), verre soufflé (Joe Kelly)

 

Kudel, Leah. The Space between Myself and I (2013), verre soufflé (Joe Kelly)

Kudel, Leah. The Space between Myself and I (2013), verre soufflé (Joe Kelly)

 

Ma pratique de l’art tourne autour du thème de l’absence, en particulier l’espace négatif. Je suis fascinée par le fait que l’absence de quelque chose ou de quelqu’un devienne notable uniquement par le fait qu’il n’existe plus. D’une certaine façon, cette absence se matérialise. J’adore essayer de souligner les espaces négatifs entre les gens par l’utilisation d’objets qui suscitent des interactions sociales troublantes.

 

Lusia Stetkiewicz

 

Stetkiewicz, Lusia. Aware (2015), verre soufflé et électronique, Dimensions Variables (Lusia Stetkiewicz)

Stetkiewicz, Lusia. Aware (2015), verre soufflé et électronique, Dimensions Variables (Lusia Stetkiewicz)

 

Stetkiewicz, Lusia. Aware (2015), verre soufflé et électronique, Dimensions Variables (Lusia Stetkiewicz)

Stetkiewicz, Lusia. Aware (2015), verre soufflé et électronique, Dimensions Variables (Lusia Stetkiewicz)

 

Pouvoir communiquer sur les thèmes de la lumière, de l’obscurité, de la vulnérabilité et du temps me donne une base de travail. Ces éléments sont tous présents d’une façon ou d’une autre dans la vie de tous les jours, mais peuvent passer inaperçus, être considérés comme normaux ou ignorés dans notre vie quotidienne. Dans mon travail, j’expose ces éléments en explorant l’environnement et le paysage extérieur et son incidence sur notre paysage intérieur.

 

La luminosité et l’obscurité peuvent à la fois faire office de métaphore exprimant la dualité entre le bien et le mal, ou de démonstration physique des jeux entre la lumière et l’ombre. Je suis fascinée par ce ressenti entre lumière et obscurité. Cette fascination vient de mon enfance passée dans le Yukon, à 25km de Whitehorse. Whitehorse est au nord de la 6Oe parallèle, il y fait jour 24h/24 pendant l’été et l’inverse en hiver.  L’hiver dure 10 mois de l’année avec la neige, la glace, le froid, la nuit, les bruits étouffés et ce sentiment d’isolement. Tous ces éléments ont fait de moi ce que je suis aujourd’hui. Vivre dans ce climat m’a rendue vulnérable et sensible de façon intrinsèque. Je m’intéresse à ce sentiment de vulnérabilité et à la fluidité de ses manifestations diverses, publiques ou privées. Avec la vulnérabilité se pose la question de la conscience de soi et de la conscience de la vie au-delà de soi. Je m’appuie sur cette base pour pratiquer mon art en développant la conscience de moi-même, des autres et des relations aux autres. J’aspire à faire ressortir de façon concrète les sensations que nous procure notre environnement : les bruits, la lumière et l’obscurité. Je m’intéresse à la façon dont l’obscurité nous enveloppe, tandis que la lumière est implacable et frénétique. Les deux sont inéluctables. Mon travail explore la façon dont les paysages intérieurs et extérieurs nous façonnent et nous influencent.

 

Mon intérêt dévoile une forme de mélancolie naturelle, je suis optimiste et motivée par la lumière, enjouée et curieuse aussi. Ce sens de la luminosité provient des étés dans le Yukon avec son soleil de minuit. Je réalise un art qui joue avec ma perception du monde pleine de curiosité, mettant souvent sens dessus dessous ma vision des choses ainsi que celle du public. Mon souhait est d’englober cette tristesse enjouée, telle que ressentie dans ma vie.

 

Bien que mon travail évolue et change constamment, mes racines seront à jamais les mêmes. Les expériences que j’ai eues, la vulnérabilité que j’ai ressentie et l’intérêt que je porte au monde qui m’entoure sont constants. Je recherche en permanence des nouvelles façons de communiquer et de modifier l’expérience de l’observateur lorsqu’il regarde une œuvre.  L’idée est de recréer les circonstances naturelles qui surviennent et nous rappellent les expériences du passé tout en créant le moment présent.  Mon travail sur les dualités entre chaud et froid, lumière et obscurité, allégresse et tristesse, communauté et solitude, ainsi que sur mon intérêt pour le monde autour, se traduit par un travail de type expérimental et curieux par nature. Mon travail a pour but de modifier la perception de l’observateur sur l’œuvre, la matérialité et l’espace qui l’entoure, en stimulant divers sens sur différents niveaux. Je souhaite réaliser un travail qui catalyse les pensées, plutôt que de présenter de simples représentations physiques ou matérielles.

 

Melony Stieben

 

Stieben, Melony. Contained (2014), verre soufflé et gravé, 14” x 5 ½” (le plus large) (Melony Stieben)

Stieben, Melony. Contained (2014), verre soufflé et gravé, 14” x 5 ½” (le plus large) (Melony Stieben)

 

Stieben, Melony. Exploration of Line (2015), verre soufflé avec tiges de murine, 24” x 5 ½ “ (Tallest) (Melony Stieben)

Stieben, Melony. Exploration of Line (2015), verre soufflé avec tiges de murine, 24” x 5 ½ “ (Tallest) (Melony Stieben)

 

Je puise mon inspiration d’une soif insatiable de la vie, pour explorer, découvrir et apprendre. Je dessine  alors pour créer ensuite à partir des motifs que j’observe autour de moi et de ceux que je découvre en regardant les images au microscope faites par des chercheurs scientifiques.

Je remarque toutes les similarités entre ces photos micro et macro de la vie. Les textures et les motifs se répètent ou se ressemblent à de nombreux niveaux lorsqu’on les regarde de près. Avec le verre comme matériau de prédilection, j’explore les différentes façons d’exprimer ma perception de ces images.

 

Melony Stieben est née à Winnipeg dans le Manitoba et a grandit au nord de l’Alberta depuis un très jeune âge. Elle a obtenu en 2015 un diplôme avec mention de l’Alberta College of Art + Design en art du verre. Son travail consiste à se concentrer sur la ligne qui crée le motif par le soufflage et le verre moulé.

 

Share

DOUBLE JE(UX)

BARBARA RENAULT+LAURIE SIMARD-BRETON – LA RÉFLEXION APPORTÉE PAR LE JEU

par Edith Deschênes

 

Du 3 juin au 4 septembre 2015, la galerie Espace VERRE présente DOUBLE JE(UX), une exposition présentant le travail de Barbara Renault et de Laurie Simard-Breton. Il s’agit des finissantes de la 24e cohorte de la formation métiers d’art-option verre, offerte par Espace VERRE en collaboration avec le Cégep du Vieux-Montréal.

 

À gauche Laurie Simard-Breton, à droite Barbara Renault (Espace VERRE, Christian Poulin)

À gauche Laurie Simard-Breton, à droite Barbara Renault (Espace VERRE, Christian Poulin)

 

Dans cette exposition, elles juxtaposent leurs JE, leurs individualités de parcours et de destinées dans une réflexion sur la société et sur l’enfance. Toutes les deux passent par le JEU pour développer leurs langages. D’abord de façon ludique, elles nous attirent pour nous laisser nous interroger, et parfois, par la suite, pour nous choquer.

 

Barbara, qui compte déjà dans ses bagages une enfance en Martinique et une formation en design, compte poursuivre sa recherche en art en utilisant différents médiums. Nomade, elle observe les différences et les travers de nos sociétés. Elle se nourrit de ce qui l’entoure, et conjugue ces idéaux passés et son présent pour finir par nous les livrer en verre. Au passage, elle nous bouscule pour mieux nous confronter avec ce que nous ignorons ou ne voulons pas voir de nous-mêmes. Travaillant la pâte de verre et la peinture sur verre, elle conçoit des installations à partir d’objets et de meubles récupérés. « Vouloir s’exprimer c’est s’extérioriser, jaillir, se donner, partager, se répandre… c’est livrer au-dehors la face cachée. C’est avoir le courage de confesser aux autres et à soi-même ce que nous portons en nous. C’est cette extériorisation qui permet l’acte créateur. » Pour la suite, elle se donnera du temps pour réfléchir, mais aussi pour sentir où la vie peut la conduire…

 

Renault, Barbara. X & Y, un jeu de construction sociale (détail) (2015), pâte de verre, feuille de verre gravée, objets trouvés. 39 po x 16 po x 22 po. (Michel Dubreuil)

Renault, Barbara. X & Y, un jeu de construction sociale (détail) (2015), pâte de verre, feuille de verre gravée, objets trouvés. 39 po x 16 po x 22 po. (Michel Dubreuil)

 

03.Renauld, Barbara. X & Y, un jeu de construction sociale (2015), pâte de verre, feuille de verre gravée, objets trouvés. 39 po x 16 po x 22 po. (Michel Dubreuil)

Renauld, Barbara. X & Y, un jeu de construction sociale (2015), pâte de verre, feuille de verre gravée, objets trouvés. 39 po x 16 po x 22 po. (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Pour Laurie, c’est par le jeu qu’elle a toujours créé, elle aime jouer dans la matière. Durant son travail, elle se laisse envahir par ses réflexions. « Le verre me fascine parce qu’il est ambigu, perdu quelque part entre le solide et le liquide ne sachant trop s’il est fragile ou fort. Je m’identifie à lui dans mon incertitude d’être. » Elle s’interroge sur l’enfance, sur les souvenirs et les émotions qui construisent un adulte. Avec l’art, elle cherche à communiquer avec la nature qu’elle retrouve dans la fabrication de ses représentations animalières et végétales. La pâte de verre est la technique qu’elle a choisie pour réaliser ses sculptures, auxquelles elle aime donner une fonction utilitaire. Elle compte poursuivre ses études en éducation à l’université et continuer, en parallèle,  son travail de fabrication d’objet utilitaire en verre.

 

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Éléphant (détail) (2015), pâte de verre, 12 po x 8 po x3 po (Michel Dubreuil)

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Éléphant (détail) (2015), pâte de verre, 12 po x 8 po x3 po (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Éléphant (2015), pâte de verre, 12 po x 8 po x3 po (Michel Dubreuil)

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Éléphant (2015), pâte de verre, 12 po x 8 po x3 po (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Deux tempéraments différents, mais qui se rejoignent, sous le même thème, le jeu, pour cette exposition qui est l’aboutissement de trois ans d’étude. Venez prendre part au début de ces deux belles carrières. Vernissage le 3 mai 2015.

 

Renauld, Barbara. Dystopie, (2014), peinture sur verre, plâtre. 79 po x 8 po. (Michel Dubreuil)

Renauld, Barbara. Dystopie, (2014), peinture sur verre, plâtre. 79 po x 8 po. (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Simard- Breton, Laurie. Crayons de cire (détail)(2015), pâte de verre, grandeur nature. (Michel Dubreuil)

Simard- Breton, Laurie. Crayons de cire (détail)(2015), pâte de verre, grandeur nature. (Michel Dubreuil)

 

DOUBLE JE (UX) se poursuivra à la galerie Espace VERRE jusqu’au 4 septembre 2015, située au 1200 rue Mill à Montréal, Québec. La galerie est ouverte du lundi au vendredi, de 9 h à 17 h, et le dernier dimanche de chaque mois de 12 h à 17 h. L’entrée est gratuite.

 

 

DOUBLE JE(UX)

BARBARA RENAULT+LAURIE SIMARD-BRETON

par Edith Deschênes

 

From June 3 until September 4, the Galerie Espace VERRE presents DOUBLE JE(UX), the exhibition, showcasing the works of Barbara Renault and Laurie Simard-Breton: the 2015 graduating class of the Fine craft – glass option program, offered in collaboration with the Cégep du Vieux Montréal. The opening reception, held in the presence of the artists, will be on Thursday, June 3 at 6:30 p.m.

 

Left: Laurie Simard-Breton. Right: Barbara Renault ( Espace VERRE, Christian Poulin)

Left: Laurie Simard-Breton. Right: Barbara Renault ( Espace VERRE, Christian Poulin)

 

For this exhibition, they have juxtaposed their JE (French translation of the pronoun “I”) into the word JEUX (“plays”). Through this play on words, they question their individual processes within a common reflection of society and childhood. With tongue in cheek, they have developed their individual artistic languages, which entice us to question ourselves and, at moments, shock us afterwards.

 

Barbara, a Martinique expatriate, hopes to pursue her artistic research with other media. Nomadic, she observes the quirks of our societies and nourishes herself with her surroundings. Dealing with ideals of the past and her own reality, she processes her emotions into glass.  She provokes us to face what we wish to ignore or refuse to see within ourselves. Working with the pâte de verre and painting on glass techniques, she creates installations with found objects and furniture. ”Wanting to express your true self is wishing to share what is within. It is about blurting out, giving and expanding … It is only after you have revealed your hidden side and had the courage to confess what you have within, that you can perform the act of creation.” For the time being, Barbara has not made plans for after graduation. She wants to think about it, as well as to let life take its due course.

 

02.Renault, Barbara. X & Y, un jeu de construction sociale (detail) (2015), pâte de verre, sandblasted sheet glass , found objects. 39 x 16  x 22 in (Michel Dubreuil)

Renault, Barbara. X & Y, un jeu de construction sociale (detail) (2015), pâte de verre, sandblasted sheet glass , found objects. 39 x 16 x 22 in (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Renault, Barbara. X & Y, un jeu de construction sociale (2015), pâte de verre, sandblasted sheet glass , found objects. 39 x 16  x 22 in (Michel Dubreuil)

Renault, Barbara. X & Y, un jeu de construction sociale (2015), pâte de verre, sandblasted sheet glass , found objects. 39 x 16 x 22 in (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Laurie has always created through play, because she loves playing with the material. While preparing waxes for her pâte de verre works, her mind is free to daydream. ”Glass fascinates me because of its ambiguous position, lost between solid and liquid states, seeming at times fragile and strong. I identify with it, in my uncertain state of being.” In her work, she contemplates about childhood, memories and the emotions that form an adult. Through art, she wants to communicate with nature through her animal and organic representations.

 

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Elephant (detail) (2015), pâte de verre. 12 x 8  x 3 in (Michel Dubreuil)

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Elephant (detail) (2015), pâte de verre. 12 x 8 x 3 in (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Elephant (2015), pâte de verre. 12 x 8 x 3 in (Michel Dubreuil)

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Elephant (2015), pâte de verre. 12 x 8 x 3 in (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Pâte de verre is the technique that Laurie has chosen to make her sculptures, of which she prefers to give utilitarian function. Furthermore, she hopes to continue her university studies in education, along with pursuing her work of fabricating utilitarian glass objects.

We invite you come witness two differing temperaments united by the exhibition’s theme of play, while admiring the achievements of three years of studies and the launch of outstanding care

Renauld, Barbara. Dystopie, (2014), painting on glass, plaster. 79 x 8 in. (Michel Dubreuil)

Renauld, Barbara. Dystopie, (2014), painting on glass, plaster. 79 x 8 in. (Michel Dubreuil)

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Crayons, (2015), pâte de verre.  Life-size.  (Michel Dubreuil)

Simard-Breton, Laurie. Crayons, (2015), pâte de verre. Life-size. (Michel Dubreuil)

ers.

 

 

 

DOUBLE JE(UX) will continue at the Galerie Espace Verre until  September 4,  2015 . Situated at 1200 rue Mill in Montréal, Québec, the gallery is open from Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. To 5 p.m., and the last Sunday of each month from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Free admission.

 

Share

Sheridan College, Class of 2015

by Stephanie Baness

 

The school year is officially over and the graduating class of Sheridan College Craft and Design Program in Glass is preparing for life beyond school. This year’s class was comprised of 15 individuals who were diverse in their medium as well as their talents. In the last three years, the students explored the hot shop through blowing and sand casting, the flame working studio, the kiln room as well as the engraving room. They were exposed to each area through classes in first year and then required to choose a major and a minor in two areas in their second and third years.

 

The students had the opportunity to design and create objects in two collaborative events, The Shed Project (in first year) and Food for Thought (in third year). The entire Craft and Design department participated, and the glass students were exposed to workshops in each of the other studios, including: furniture, textiles and ceramics. They also worked with students from these other studios to create their final project. The results of these collaborations were shown and juried and the interactions with the other studios spawned new partnerships and friendships.

 

It was not all work and no play for three years. The 2015 graduates took a trip to the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, NY in their first year to attend the 51st Annual Seminar on Glass: Celebrating 50 Years of American Studio Glass. The students attended lectures by Paul Marioni and Tina Oldknow, observed demos by Lino Tagliapietra and William Gudenrath and explored the museum and library. In 2014, the students attended the GAS conference in Chicago in March and then came back to Chicago for the SOFA show in November.

 

In addition to traveling and attending classes, the 2015 graduates spent countless hours in the studio and their classroom. They grew close and assisted one another with solving creative problems and vetting ideas for new work. They inspired each other and they learned how to be supportive and critical in their assessment of work. Although these students are going their separate ways, the relationships they formed in the last three years will flourish. The students plan to meet monthly to discuss ideas, critique work and continue the supportive atmosphere they experienced at Sheridan for three years.

 

Good luck in your future endeavors, Class of 2015!

 

Lozanovski, Lila. Na Zdravje  Series (2015), kiln casted glass, 8”h x 9”w (Jade Chittock)

Lozanovski, Lila. Na Zdravje  Series (2015), kiln casted glass, 8”h x 9”w (Jade Chittock)

 

Downman, Courtney. Grey Bowl (2015), blown and sawed glass, (Tiffany Lefebvre)

Downman, Courtney. Grey Bowl (2015), blown and sawed glass, (Tiffany Lefebvre)

 

Ireson, Danielle. Finding Centre - Needle Series (2015), Hot sculpted and engraved glass, (Danielle Ireson)

Ireson, Danielle. Finding Centre – Needle Series (2015), Hot sculpted and engraved glass, (Danielle Ireson)

 

Butterworth, Caitie. Broken Girl (2014), kiln casted glass, 16”h x 10” w (Dylan Brown)

Butterworth, Caitie. Broken Girl (2014), kiln casted glass, 16”h x 10” w (Dylan Brown)

 

Ritter, Robin. Slant Series (2015), blown glass, various sizes (Jade Chittock)

Ritter, Robin. Slant Series (2015), blown glass, various sizes (Jade Chittock)

 

Fazal, Rahim. Bedrock Series (2015), blown glass, 8”w x 6”h (Rahim Fazal)

Fazal, Rahim. Bedrock Series (2015), blown glass, 8”w x 6”h (Rahim Fazal)

 

Gloin, Charlotte. Umbrella Girl Series (2014) sandcasted glass, 16”h x 6”w x 1”d (Charlotte Gloin)

Gloin, Charlotte. Umbrella Girl Series (2014) sandcasted glass, 16”h x 6”w x 1”d (Charlotte Gloin)

 

Adams, Justin. White Pollock Pot 2 (2015), blown glass 6”h x 14”w x10”d (Justin Adams)

Adams, Justin. White Pollock Pot 2 (2015), blown glass 6”h x 14”w x10”d (Justin Adams)

 

Bosveld, Michelle. Dedication (2014), laminated glass, 14”h x 11”w x 2” d (Michelle Bosveld)

Bosveld, Michelle. Dedication (2014), laminated glass, 14”h x 11”w x 2” d (Michelle Bosveld)

 

MacInnis, Ian. Pokeball (2015), blown glass, 6”h x 8”w (Lo Brown)

MacInnis, Ian. Pokeball (2015), blown glass, 6”h x 8”w (Lo Brown)

 

Rockey, Kristen. GMO (2014), Kiln cast glass, 4”h x 6”w x 1” d (Kristen Rockey)

Rockey, Kristen. GMO (2014), Kiln cast glass, 4”h x 6”w x 1” d (Kristen Rockey)

 

Spreen, Kristian. Melting Ice (2015), Blown and sawed glass, Various sizes (Kristian Spreen)

Spreen, Kristian. Melting Ice (2015), Blown and sawed glass, Various sizes (Kristian Spreen)

 

Baness, Stephanie. Hail Mary (2015), sandcasted glass 6”h x 40”w x 52”d (Stephanie Baness)

Baness, Stephanie. Hail Mary (2015), sandcasted glass 6”h x 40”w x 52”d (Stephanie Baness)

 

 

Promotion 2015 du Sheridan College

par Stephanie Baness

 

L’année scolaire vient de se terminer et la classe qui a obtenu son diplôme du programme verre du Sheridan College s’apprête à entrer dans le monde professionnel. La promotion de cette année comptait 15 étudiants, qui se différenciaient tous par leurs styles et leurs talents. Au cours des 3 dernières années, les étudiants ont travaillé dans l’atelier le soufflage et la gravure, le chalumeau, la pâte de verre et le sablage. Ils ont découvert chacun des domaines au travers des cours introductifs en première année et ont ensuite pu choisir deux options pour leur 2e et 3e année.

 

Les étudiants ont eu la possibilité de réaliser des objets lors de deux événements communautaires, le Shed Project (en 1ere année) et Food for Thought (en 3e année). La totalité du département des Arts et du Design y a participé et les étudiants en verre ont suivi des sessions dans tous les autres ateliers, dont les textiles, la menuiserie et la céramique. Ils ont travaillé avec les étudiants de ces ateliers pour réaliser leurs projets de fin d’études. Le résultat de ces collaborations a pu être présenté et les interactions avec ces autres ateliers ont donné naissance à de nouveaux partenariats et de belles amitiés.

 

Il ne fut pas question que de travail acharné au cours de ces 3 années. Les diplômés 2015 ont effectué un voyage au Corning Museum of Glass, NY, pour participer au 51e séminaire annuel sur le verre : Celebrating 50 Years of American Studio Glass. Les étudiants ont assisté à des conférences données par Paul Marioni et Tina Oldknow, ont observé des démonstrations faites par Lino, Tagliapietra et William Gudenrath, et ont découvert le musée et la bibliothèque. En mars 2014, les étudiants ont assisté à la conférence du GAS à Chicago puis y sont retournés pour le SOFA en Novembre.

 

En plus de voyager et d’assister aux cours, la promotion 2015 a passé un nombre incalculable d’heures dans l’atelier et la salle de classe. Ils se sont rapprochés et se sont entraidés pour leurs questionnements de créativité ou pour sonder leurs idées avant de réaliser de nouvelles œuvres. Ils se sont mutuellement inspirés et se sont soutenus tout en restant critiques dans le jugement de leurs objets. Bien que ces étudiants prennent à présent des chemins différents, les liens qu’ils ont créés durant ces trois années vont perdurer. Les étudiants ont prévu de se rassembler tous les mois pour débattre de leurs idées, évaluer leur travail et prolonger l’ambiance chaleureuse d’entraide qu’ils ont su entretenir à Sheridan pendant 3 ans.

 

Bonne chance pour la suite, promotion 2015!!

 

Lozanovski, Lila. Na Zdravje  Series (2015), pâte de verre, 8”h x 9”w (Jade Chittock)

Lozanovski, Lila. Na Zdravje  Series (2015), pâte de verre, 8”h x 9”w (Jade Chittock)

 

Downman, Courtney. Grey Bowl (2015), verre soufflé et découpé, (Tiffany Lefebvre)

Downman, Courtney. Grey Bowl (2015), verre soufflé et découpé, (Tiffany Lefebvre)

 

Ireson, Danielle. Finding Centre - Needle Series (2015), sculpture à chaud et gravure, (Danielle Ireson)

Ireson, Danielle. Finding Centre – Needle Series (2015), sculpture à chaud et gravure, (Danielle Ireson)

 

Butterworth, Caitie. Broken Girl (2014), pâte de verre, 16”h x 10” w (Dylan Brown)

Butterworth, Caitie. Broken Girl (2014), pâte de verre, 16”h x 10” w (Dylan Brown)

 

Ritter, Robin. Slant Series (2015), verre soufflé, différentes tailles (Jade Chittock)

Ritter, Robin. Slant Series (2015), verre soufflé, différentes tailles (Jade Chittock)

 

Fazal, Rahim. Bedrock Series (2015), verre soufflé, 8”w x 6”h (Rahim Fazal)

Fazal, Rahim. Bedrock Series (2015), verre soufflé, 8”w x 6”h (Rahim Fazal)

 

Gloin, Charlotte. Umbrella Girl Series (2014) verre sablé, 16”h x 6”w x 1”d (Charlotte Gloin)

Gloin, Charlotte. Umbrella Girl Series (2014) verre sablé, 16”h x 6”w x 1”d (Charlotte Gloin)

 

Adams, Justin. White Pollock Pot 2 (2015), verre soufflé,  6”h x 14”w x10”d (Justin Adams)

Adams, Justin. White Pollock Pot 2 (2015), verre soufflé, 6”h x 14”w x10”d (Justin Adams)

 

Bosveld, Michelle. Dedication (2014), verre laminé, 14”h x 11”w x 2” d (Michelle Bosveld)

Bosveld, Michelle. Dedication (2014), verre laminé, 14”h x 11”w x 2” d (Michelle Bosveld)

 

MacInnis, Ian. Pokeball (2015), verre soufflé, 6”h x 8”w (Lo Brown)

MacInnis, Ian. Pokeball (2015), verre soufflé, 6”h x 8”w (Lo Brown)

 

Rockey, Kristen. GMO (2014), pâte de verre, 4”h x 6”w x 1” d (Kristen Rockey)

Rockey, Kristen. GMO (2014), pâte de verre, 4”h x 6”w x 1” d (Kristen Rockey)

 

Spreen, Kristian. Melting Ice (2015), verre soufflé et découpé, différentes tailles (Kristian Spreen)

Spreen, Kristian. Melting Ice (2015), verre soufflé et découpé, différentes tailles (Kristian Spreen)

 

Baness, Stephanie. Hail Mary (2015), verre sablé 6”h x 40”w x 52”d (Stephanie Baness)

Baness, Stephanie. Hail Mary (2015), verre sablé 6”h x 40”w x 52”d (Stephanie Baness)

 

Share

Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition, ACAD Launches an MFA in Craft Media

by Bev Rodgers

 

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg 
(L-R) Natali Rodrigues, Marty Kaufman, Tyler Rock. Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg 
(L-R) Natali Rodrigues, Marty Kaufman, Tyler Rock. Andy Nichols Photographer

 

Imagine a boy peering over the edge of a boat as it floats silently above the shifting, crystalline depths of an Arctic lake.

 

I had the pleasure of sharing an afternoon recently with Tyler Rock (the boy in the boat) and his teaching colleagues in the ACAD Glass program, Natali Rodrigues and Marty Kaufman. The intent was to investigate the history of glass at ACAD, where they are all respected faculty members. The conversation, however, was wide-ranging, as these three are well travelled. We touched upon the pivotal axis of place, of movement and rootedness and of influences both personal and professional.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

 

ACAD is launching an MFA in Craft Media in September 2015. It seems a good time to acknowledge, as Marty puts it, “the shoulders we stand on.” I was curious about their shared experiences as students of Norman Faulkner. Norm was the founder of the ACAD Glass program in 1974. He headed up the department for 30 years, while also developing a significant reputation as a pioneer of the studio glass movement in Canada and beyond.

 

Marty, Tyler and Natali represent three generations of Norm’s 30 year teaching career. Far too individualistic to ever be considered disciples, the antithesis of Norm’s approach, they are each in their way, stewards of a particular ethos that took root in Glass at ACAD in the ‘70s and still flourishes to this day. It is an ethos of risk-taking, exploration, conceptualization and experimentation; of being disciplined enough to fly without a net.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

 

As highly skilled and experienced glass artists, all three are well-equipped to support students in their technical development. However, they all agree that success does not have to fall within the context of a single medium. Perhaps it is the mercurial nature of the material itself that fuels this pluralistic and inclusive approach.

 

The diversity of valued personal mentorship experiences within this group is telling. Natali references painter Bill MacDonnell and interdisciplinary artist Vera Gartley as having revolutionized her thinking. For Marty, who was apprenticing in a stone-carving atelier in Paris at age nineteen, it was with sculptor Katie Ohe that he found a spiritual home as a student. He cites her boundless generosity and level of commitment to practice as a great example to us all. Tyler retains a deep appreciation for the ways that print artist Ken Webb challenged him to re-think process, recalling the joy that Ken demonstrated when encountering work he responded to.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer 05.Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer 06.	Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes (Sign above Hot shop says “Light” by Alumni David Blankenstyn (BFA Glass 2010) Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

 

Our conversation circled back to the link between travel and education and the role it continues to play for all three. As a child, Natali lived all over the world. Inspired by the richness of a migratory experience and grandparents who were cartographers, she has walked the Camino Trail to connect to family history and explore faith. Her current research interests are situated at the intersection of silence and liminality. Marty, who sojourned Europe from ages 18-24, spends summers working in Rome.  This international experience is pivotal, fueling him as an artist and a teacher. Carving and sandblasting undulating forms, he subverts and disrupts the material, challenging notions of strength, fragility and beauty.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

 

Raised by a wildlife biologist, Tyler spent his youth in Northern Saskatchewan and his summers in the Arctic Circle. The effect of infinite space occupies him. Interpretation of landscape and its relationship to the natural world is in his DNA. After a recent prolonged stay in Australia, he explores the capacity for an object to affect space and activate an experience.

 

Gifted and generous teachers at their core, Natali, Tyler and Marty are quick to share stories of alumni living and working all over the world, redefining glass as a contemporary material.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes (Sign above Hot shop says “Light” by Alumni David Blankenstyn (BFA Glass 2010) Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes (Sign above Hot shop says “Light” by Alumni David Blankenstyn (BFA Glass 2010) Andy Nichols Photographer

 

With additional support from teaching colleagues like Jim Norton and Rob Lewis, studio technicians and practicing glass artists Mark Gibeau and Lisa Cerny and a roster of visiting artists, the Glass department thrives. It is, in Norm’s words “informed by history, but not bound by tradition.” All those who resist prescriptive outcomes, value deep engagement and embrace curiosity are welcome to the table.

 

MFA Applications are now open. http://www.acad.ca/mfa.html

 

 

 

« Lié par le passé mais pas dépendant de ses traditions », l’ACAD lance un MFA en Craft Media

par Bev Rodgers

 

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg 
(L-R) Natali Rodrigues, Marty Kaufman, Tyler Rock. Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg 
(L-R) Natali Rodrigues, Marty Kaufman, Tyler Rock. Andy Nichols Photographer

 

Imaginez-vous un petit garçon accoudé au bord d’un bateau tandis qu’il dérive lentement, bercé par les eaux cristallines d’un lac en antarctique.

 

J’ai eu la joie de passer récemment un après-midi avec Tyler Rock (le garçon du bateau) et ses collègues enseignants du programme verre de l’ACAD, Natali Rodrigues et Marty Kaufman. L’idée était de conduire des recherches sur l’histoire du verre à l’ACAD, où tous sont des membres reconnus du corps enseignant. La conversation a cependant pris un tournant plus large, car ils sont tous les trois roulé leur bosse. Nous avons abordé la question de l’impact du lieu, du voyage et des origines, ainsi que des influences à la fois personnelles et professionnelles.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

 

L’ACAD va démarrer un MFA en Craft Media en Septembre 2015. Cela semble être le bon moment pour faire une rétrospective sur «les piliers sur lesquels nous marchons », tel que le dit Marty. J’étais curieux de partager avec eux leurs expériences en tant qu’étudiants de Normal Faulkner. Norm est le fondateur du programme verre de l’ACAD en 1974. Il a tenu le département pendant 30 ans tout en se construisant la réputation grandissante d’être le pionnier du mouvement des ateliers verriers au Canada et au-delà.

 

Marty, Tyler et Natali forment trois générations de la carrière d’enseignant de Norm. Trop individualistes pour se considérer disciples, l’antithèse de l’approche de Norm, ils sont chacun à leur façon, les ambassadeurs d’une philosophie distincte qui a germé à l’ACAD dans les années 70 et perdure encore de nos jours. C’est un état d’esprit encourageant la prise de risques, l’exploration, la conceptualisation et l’expérimentation, le fait d’être suffisamment rigoureux pour pouvoir voler sans filet.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

 

En tant qu’artistes expérimentés et compétents dans le verre, tous trois ont les équipements nécessaires pour aider leurs étudiants à progresser techniquement. Tous conviennent que la réussite n’est pas forcément due au travail d’un seul matériau. Parfois c’est la nature changeante du matériau lui-même qui suscite cette approche pluraliste et entière.

 

La diversité des expériences personnelles au sein du groupe auprès de mentors reconnus nous parle d’elle-même. Natali cite le peintre Bill MacDonnell et l’artiste pluridisciplinaire Vera Gartley pour avoir révolutionné son mode de penser. Marty, lui, nous parle de la sculptrice Katie Ohe chez qui il a été apprenti à Paris à l’âge de 19 ans, et qui lui a fourni une maison spirituelle. Il nous parle de sa générosité infinie et de son fort engagement comme exemple pour tous. Tyler garde en souvenir la façon dont l’artiste en impressions Ken Webb l’a challengé pour repenser ses façons de procéder et la joie de Ken lorsqu’il voyait les œuvres qui en découlaient.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer 05.Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer 06.	Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes (Sign above Hot shop says “Light” by Alumni David Blankenstyn (BFA Glass 2010) Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

 

Notre discussion revint au lien entre le voyage et l’éducation, à ce que cela continue de leur apporter. Enfant, Natali a habité dans le monde entier. Inspirée par la richesse de cette expérience migratoire et de l’historique de ses grands-parents cartographes, elle a fait le pèlerinage de St Jacques de Compostelle pour retrouver ses origines familiales et explorer sa foi. Ses centres d’intérêts actuels portent sur l’intersection entre le silence et la liminalité. Marty a séjourné en Europe de 18 à 24 ans et passe ses étés à Rome. Cette expérience est fondamentale et l’inspire en tant qu’artiste et enseignant. La gravure et le sablage de formes ondulées lui permet de questionner le matériau, de challenger les notions de force, de fragilité et de beauté.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes Andy Nichols Photographer

 

Eduqué par un biologiste de la nature, Tyler a passé son enfance en Saskatchewan du nord et ses étés au cercle polaire. L’impact de l’espace infini occupe son esprit. L’interprétation des grands espaces et sa relation à la nature est dans ses gènes. Après un séjour prolongé en Australie, il explore à présent la capacité d’un objet à occuper l’espace et à générer une expérience.

 

Natali, Tyler et Marty sont des enseignants généreux et doués qui partagent volontiers leur histoire en tant qu’anciens élèves ayant parcouru et travaillé dans le monde entier, remettant le verre au gout du jour.

 

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes (Sign above Hot shop says “Light” by Alumni David Blankenstyn (BFA Glass 2010) Andy Nichols Photographer

Rodgers_ Informed by History but Not Bound by Tradition.jpg
Hot Shop – cold but ready, behind the scenes (Sign above Hot shop says “Light” by Alumni David Blankenstyn (BFA Glass 2010) Andy Nichols Photographer

 

Avec le soutien additionnel de collègues enseignants tels que Jim Norton et Rob Lewis, les techniciens d’ateliers et les artistes verriers Mark Gibeau et Lisa Cerny ainsi que toute une foule d’artistes intervenants, le département du verre prospère. Tel que le dit Norm, il est « lié à son passé mais pas dépendant de ses traditions ». Tous ceux qui combattent la normalité, sont profondément dévoués et curieux d’esprit, sont les bienvenus.

 

Les candidatures pour postuler au MFA sont à présent ouvertes : http://www.acad.ca/mfa.html

 

 

Share

Sheridan College and our artists in residence, Kasia Czarnota and Mathieu Grodet

by Liliann Lozanovski

 

As students at Sheridan College’s creative campus, we have access to a wealth of information and support from our acclaimed professors. We were all very excited to learn that Kasia Czarnota and Mathieu Grodet would be our upcoming artists-in-residence.

 

Kasia Czarnota, an established artist and past Sheridan student (2006), quickly felt at home with us in the hotshop and kiln casting room. She answered questions and helped make this year the most memorable. Her knowledge, skill and attention gave us a chance to learn about what it is to be creative thinkers. Her philosophies and dedication to her craft were contagious. Her demonstrations kept us asking for more.

 

Kasia at work in the kiln casting room at Sheridan

Kasia at work in the kiln casting room at Sheridan

 

 

Watching Mathieu Grodet was like watching a dancer perform. He dove into his day with determination and focus, as if choreographing each step along the way.  The attention to detail in his work brought feelings of gentleness and strength at the same time.  We all wondered how he did this amazing work. His professionalism and dedication to his craft made it easy for us to learn that the workings of an artist are found within. We always knew he was in for the day when we saw fresh bread, cheese and his knife on the table, as he left it there as a reminder to eat.

 

Mathieu at work in the blowing studio at Sheridan

Mathieu at work in the blowing studio at Sheridan

 

Liliann Lozanovski: How did you hear about the artist-in-residence position at Sheridan College?

Kasia Czarnota: Koen Vanderstukken, head of the glass program. He sent out an email looking for an artist-in-residence. I had to write a proposal, explaining how I would use my residency and skills at Sheridan. I applied with 15 images, a CV and my artist statement

Mathieu Grodet: I heard about the position through my network of friends.

 

LL: Why Sheridan College?

KC: The location was very important for me. I could get here easily. There aren’t many residencies available to me since I live in Toronto. I knew [the college] was phenomenal, based on my experience as a student.

MG: Sheridan College is a unique place in Canada ‘cause there are complete facilities and the other studios around (wood, ceramic, textile, 3D printing, etc.), which create a nice dynamic for creation. It is very motivating to be in such an environment.

 

LL: What were the hours like?

KC: Being a monitor in the studio and mentor to the students two days/nights per week, when the faculty was gone until close of the studio (12:30am), you have time to make your own work. For me, I could actively make moulds [and] polish and blow. I also did a lot of work at home during my residency because my son, Adam, is four years old.

MG: The hours depend on your original agreement with the pedagogic team. I had four shifts (that were six hours each), where I monitored, and two four-hour slots of blowing time, per week.

 

LL: Do you have another job or work/how were you able to fit this in your schedule?

KC: I have a four-year-old and a husband, who is a potter. I had to find a stable job to provide security to allow my husband to do that for a living. I worked around this and parenting as well as worked on my waxes at home.

MG: I do have a job, two days a week, so I made sure to have my duty hours at the school available. It was pretty busy.

 

LL:  What was your experience like?

KC:  It’s been amazing in a lot of ways. I learned a lot more than I expected. Students are doing amazing work and there is a real creative energy that being in an environment like this gives you.

MG: I had an awesome experience, having been able to use all of the school’s facilities. It is quite magical being able to think of things you want to create in glass and then realize them in almost one day.

 

LL:  Did you instruct/teach students while you were here?

KC:  Yes, I did demos on pâte de verre, colour tests and making complicated and hollow core moulds. As a kiln castor, you tend to work in solitude. When I saw everybody’s eyes pop while giving my demo, I realized I have a lot of knowledge to give students and they were able to use this knowledge to make their work. I also really enjoyed talking to people about their work.

MG: More or less, I am only competent in blowing and torching, so I provide some advice here and there in those disciplines. I guess that is also why the other artist-in-residence, Kasia Czarnota, was more into kiln casting and was able to provide advice in her field of expertise.

 

LL:  Did you learn something new (for example: a technique or approach)?

KC: Yes, a coffee cup method for making small piece moulds. It took me such a long time cutting plastic sheeting before. It completely blew my mind. Also, the ‘Tippin Wedge’.  When Steve Tippin is making a two-part mould, he adds a piece of clay to the side, so that when separating the mould, he knocks that chunk of clay and the mould easily opens. Gabby Wilson’s technique of using vegetable shortening to fill in wax moulds. It used to take me hours to smooth my waxes by hand.

MG: I did learn something new, the roll-up technique with Effetre (soft glass) solid colour. I had never tried it before, so this residency was the perfect opportunity to learn it.

 

LL: Would you consider coming back if asked? Do you recommend this position?

KC: I would, I would. It’s the kind of thing that the more you put into it the more you get out of it. As a parent, it hasn’t been easy. The late hours being a monitor were a little difficult. As long as you can work it into your personal schedule, you learn from the students. I would love to come back. As an artist-in-residence, you have the opportunity to do a second semester. I can’t come back in September because my husband has four shows to prepare [for] (this is his big push year). I would like to come back in the winter semester, if I can get back into the pool of applicants.

MG: Of course, I will actually come back in September for another semester. Of course I do recommend this position. It is good to be able to measure your progress along the way and to have contact with the new generation of glassmakers. It is also an experience as an artist to be free and welcome to create in a good environment.

 

LL: What was most memorable about your experience at Sheridan College?

KC: The two things I am taking away from this are: 1. Confidence – I know what I am doing and I have a lot to give and 2: momentum – the things that I haven’t been able to finish, I am going to finish. I feel like I have a new direction in my life, so I am really happy. There were two things that I wanted to do when I was here: blow moulds and experiment with texture.  The way I want to work is very pristine and I wanted to dirty things up a bit, like [with] sand and electroforming. I wanted to add that, but the experiments did not really work out. All the pieces on my shelf will be part of an installation for Mark (a recent personal tragedy). It will hang from the tree in his favorite spot at the cottage. The pieces will have inclusions, organic matter and some writing on them.

MG: The exhibition at the Sandra Ainsley Gallery, where all the students were presenting their final work to potential buyers. I also want to thank all the students for welcoming me and the team: Koen, Jason, Steve, Paula, Andy and Brad. I won’t forget all of their help that came along with this residency.

 

It has been an absolutely unique experience working with Kasia and Mathieu.  I have learned so much.

 

The exchange of energy is so important when you are making, whether it is within yourself or with others in the environments where you create. It is something that is nurtured within a group. Respect for each other, engagement and so many other things come from this energy.

 

You cannot detach yourself from what you create. It envelops you and does not separate from anything else that is happening in your life.  No matter which career path you choose, if you are not present or not doing something fulfilling, you will find yourself checking off a checklist. It becomes robotic.  You cannot separate what happens in your life, as it influences who you are and what you do. Making is like an extension of yourself. To make you have to be true to yourself.

 

 

Lila is a first generation Canadian of Macedonian decent and is currently pursuing an education in Craft and Design in Glass in the Craft and Design Program at Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario. 

Her engravings and cast glass forms are based on her longing for the connection of physical materiality with her hands. Her interest in combining textiles with glass communicates her questioning of the ephemeral and concrete aspects of material.  It translates into the aspects of life that are often seen as fleeting moments (presence) and memories (past), as those are the qualities of our everyday thoughts, which bring our life its most important meaning.  

In 2013, she was awarded for her two-dimensional work for the Canada, The Land of Contrast competition.  In 2014, she was recognized for her work in the collaborative lighting project, SHED, and, additionally, she was chosen to work collaboratively on The B-Wing International Stairwell Project. In 2015, her collaborative work for the Food for Thought Project, Jump’in Snack, was chosen for view in the Sheridan Gallery.

 

 

 

Le Sheridan College et ses artistes résidents, Kasia Czarnota et Mathieu Grodet

par Liliann Lozanovski

 

 

En tant qu’étudiants du campus créatif de Sheridan College nous bénéficions d’une mine d’informations en plus du soutien des enseignants. Nous étions tous impatients à l’idée de recevoir Kasia Czarnota et Mathieu Grodet en tant qu’artistes résidents.

 

Artiste reconnue et ancienne élève du Sheridan en 2006, Kasia Czarnota s’est sentie à l’aise dans notre atelier de soufflage et notre pièce destinée au travail du verre moulé. Elle a répondu à nos questions et nous a aidés à rendre cette année mémorable. Grâce à ses connaissances, ses compétences et sa bienveillance, nous avons compris la subtilité d’un vrai esprit créatif. Sa philosophie et son amour pour l’art ont été contagieux. Ses démonstrations nous paraissaient toujours trop courtes.

 

Kasia au travail dans la pièce pour les pâtes de verre à Sheridan

Kasia au travail dans la pièce pour les pâtes de verre à Sheridan

 

 

Mathieu Grodet travaillait à la manière d’un danseur professionnel. Il entamait sa journée avec détermination et réflexion, comme si chacun des pas de sa journée étaient issus d’une chorégraphie. Son attention du détail dans son travail créait une impression de délicatesse et de force à la fois. Nous nous interrogions tous sur sa façon  de réaliser un travail si formidable. Son professionnalisme et son dévouement pour l’art nous a permis de mieux comprendre que les œuvres d’un artiste vivent en lui. Chaque fois qu’il y avait du pain frais, du fromage et son couteau sur la table, nous savions qu’il était là, comme s’il le mettait là pour penser à manger.

 

Mathieu au travail à l’atelier de soufflage de Sheridan

Mathieu au travail à l’atelier de soufflage de Sheridan

 

Liliann Lozanovski: Comment avez-vous entendu parler du poste d’artiste résident au Sheridan College?

Kasia Czarnota: Koen Vanderstukken, le directeur du programme verre, nous a envoyé un email à la recherche d’un artiste résident. J’ai envoyé  une proposition écrite expliquant ce que cette résidence pourrait m’apporter et quelles compétences pourraient être mises à profit à Sheridan. J’ai postulé avec 15 photos, un CV et ma démarche artistique.

Mathieu Grodet: J’ai entendu parler de cette offre au travers de mon réseau d’amis.

 

LL: Pourquoi le Sheridan College?

KC: Le lieu était très important pour moi. Je pouvais m’y rendre facilement. Comme j’habite à Toronto, il y a peu de résidences à proximité. J’avais un très bon souvenir du collège quand j’y étais étudiante.

MG: Le Sheridan College est un endroit unique au Canada parce qu’il y a toutes les infrastructures nécessaires en plus de tous les autres ateliers autour (bois, céramique, textiles, imprimerie 3D, etc.), ce qui crée une bonne dynamique de créativité. C’est un environnement très motivant.

 

LL: Comment se déroulaient vos journées?

KC: J’enseignais dans l’atelier et j’étais mentor pour les étudiants deux jours/nuits par semaine. Une fois les étudiants partis, il reste du temps libre jusqu’à la fermeture de l’atelier (00 :30) pour réaliser son propre travail. En ce qui me concerne, j’ai pu me consacrer activement à la réalisation de moules, au polissage et au soufflage. J’ai aussi beaucoup travaillé de chez moi durant ma résidence car j’ai un fils de 4 ans.

MG: L’emploi du temps dépend de l’accord passé avec l’équipe pédagogique. J’avais 4 roulements de 6 heures chacun pendant lesquels j’accompagnais les élèves et deux créneaux de 4 heures par semaine pour souffler.

 

LL: Avez-vous un autre travail à côté? Comment avez-vous pu intégrer cela dans votre emploi du temps?

KC: Mon mari est potier et j’ai un enfant de 4 ans. Il me fallait trouver un travail fiable pour assurer un revenu et permettre à mon mari de vivre de son activité. J’ai poursuivi mon travail en parallèle, ainsi que gardé notre enfant et travaillé sur mes cires à la maison.

MG: J’ai effectivement un travail 2 jours par semaine, donc je me suis assuré d’être disponible pour mes heures de permanences à l’école. Ça a été une période intense.

 

LL: Qu’avez-vous pensé de cette expérience? 

KC: Ca a été super par beaucoup d’aspects. J’ai appris plus que je ne le pensais. Les étudiants font un travail fabuleux et il y a une véritable énergie créative qui se dégage d’un tel environnement.

MG: Ca a été une expérience géniale car j’ai pu utiliser toutes les infrastructures de l’école. C’est assez magique de réfléchir aux choses en verre que vous souhaitez créer  et de pouvoir ensuite les réaliser en l’espace d’une journée quasiment.

 

LL: Avez-vous donné des cours aux étudiants durant votre temps ici?

KC: Oui, j’ai fait des démonstrations verre moulé, de tests de couleur et comment faire des moules complexes et creux à l’intérieur. Quand on crée des moules, on a tendance à travailler seul. En voyant les yeux ébahis de tous pendant mes démonstration, je me suis rendue compte que j’avais beaucoup de connaissances à partager avec les étudiants et ils ont pu s’en servir pour faire leur travail. J’ai aussi beaucoup aimé pouvoir parler avec eux de leur travail.

MG: Je ne suis vraiment compétent qu’en soufflage et en travail au chalumeau, donc j’ai pu fournir des conseils à ce sujet de temps en temps. Je suppose que c’est aussi la raison pour laquelle l’autre artiste résidente Kasia Czarnota était plus sollicitée pour le verre moulé et a aussi fourni beaucoup de conseils dans ce champ d’expertise.

 

LL: Avez-vous appris de nouvelles choses (par exemple une autre technique ou approche)?

KC: Oui, une méthode à l’aide d’une tasse à café pour créer des moules pour faire des petites pièces. Avant, cela me prenait tellement de temps en découpage de feuilles de plastique. J’ai été totalement épatée. Egalement, le “Tippin Wedge”. Lorsque Steve Tippin fait un moule en deux parties, il ajoute un morceau d’argile sur le côté. Il lui suffit ensuite de taper sur ce bout d’argile quand il veut séparer le moule pour qu’il s’ouvre très facilement. La technique de Gabby Wilson en utilisant de la graisse végétale pour remplir les moules en cire. Cela me prenait des heures pour lisser la cire dans mes mains.

MG: J’ai effectivement appris quelque chose de nouveau, la technique du roll-up avec des couleurs solides Effetre (en verre mou). Je ne l’avais jamais testée auparavant, cette résidence a été l’occasion parfaite pour m’y mettre.

 

LL: Reviendriez-vous si on vous le proposait? Recommanderiez-vous ce poste ?

KC: Oui je le ferai. C’est le genre de chose dans laquelle plus vous vous investissez, et plus vous y gagnez. En tant que parent, cela n’a pas été simple. Les heures tardives pour l’accompagnement ont été un peu difficiles. Tant que vous pouvez les intégrer dans votre agenda personnel, il y a beaucoup à apprendre des étudiants. J’adorerai revenir. Quand vous êtes artiste résident, vous avez l’opportunité d’effectuer un second semestre. Je ne peux pas revenir en Septembre car mon mari doit préparer 4 expositions (c’est une très grosse année de lancement). J’aimerai revenir cet hiver, si je peux me réinscrire dans la prochaine liste de candidats.

MG: Bien sûr, je reviens d’ailleurs en septembre pour un deuxième semestre. Et bien sûr, je recommande cette position. C’est très agréable d’être témoin de son progrès tout du long et d’être en contact avec la nouvelle génération d’artistes verriers. C’est aussi une très bonne sensation pour un artiste que de se sentir libre de créer dans un environnement positif.

 

LL: Qu’est-ce qui vous a le plus marqué durant votre expérience au Sheridan College?

KC: Je retiendrai deux choses de cette expérience. 1. La confiance – Je sais ce que je fais et j’ai beaucoup à offrir. 2. Un élan – Ce que je n’ai pas pu finir, je vais le terminer. J’ai l’impression d’avoir pris une nouvelle direction dans ma vie, ce qui me rend vraiment heureuse. Il y avait deux choses que je voulais vraiment faire lors de mon temps sur place: souffler des moules et explorer les textures. La façon dont je travaille habituellement est très méticuleuse et je voulais faire les choses un peu plus salement, au sablage et à l’électroformage. Je voulais juste le mentionner, mais les résultats n’ont pas été convaincants. Toutes les pièces sur cette étagère vont faire partie d’une installation pour Mark (une tragédie personnelle récente). Elles seront suspendues dans un arbre à l’endroit préféré de son cottage. Les pièces contiendront des inclusions, des matières organiques et des choses écrites dessus.

MG: L’exposition à la Sandra Ainsley Gallery, où tous les étudiants ont présenté leur travail de fin d’année à des acheteurs potentiels. Je tiens aussi à remercier tous les étudiants pour leur accueil ainsi que l’équipe : Koen, Jason, Steve, Paula, Andy et Brad. Je n’oublierai pas l’aide qu’ils m’ont apportée durant cette résidence.

 

Pouvoir ainsi travailler avec Kasia et Mathieu a aussi été une expérience unique pour moi. J’ai tant appris.

 

Le partage de l’énergie est très important lorsque vous créez, que ce soit avec vous-même ou avec les autres personnes présentes dans votre environnement de création. Ce phénomène se crée au sein d’un groupe. Il découle alors de cette énergie du respect pour autrui, du dévouement, et tant d’autres choses.

 

Il est impossible de vous détacher de ce que vous créez. Cela vous enveloppe et ne fait qu’un avec tout ce qui se passe dans votre vie. Quel que soit votre choix de carrière, si vous ne faites pas pleinement les choses, vous vous retrouverez à cocher des listes tel un robot. Vous ne pouvez dissocier tout ce qui vous arrive, car cela vous influence et fait partie de vous-même et de ce que vous faites. La création est comme une extension de vous. Pour vous garantir que vous êtes honnête avec vous-même.

 

 

Lila est la première descendante canadienne d’une famille macédonienne et réalise actuellement des études en Art et Design du Verre dans le programme Craft et Design du Sheridan College à Oakville, Ontario.

Ses gravures et pâtes de verre s’inspirent de son attrait pour le contact physique du matériau avec ses mains. Son intérêt à combiner les textiles avec le verre montre son questionnement face aux apparences concrètes et éphémères du matériau. Cela se traduit par ces aspects de la vie souvent perçus dans des moments brefs (du présent) et les souvenirs (du passé), moteurs de nos pensées au quotidien qui donnent à notre vie son plus grand sens. 

 En 2013, elle a reçu un prix pour son travail en deux dimensions au concours canadien The Land of Contrast. En 2014, elle a été reconnue pour son travail dans le projet commun d’éclairage, SHED. En outre,  elle a été choisie pour travailler dans le projet en collaboration The B-Wing International Stairwell Project. En 2015, son travail collaboratif Jump’in Snack pour le projet Food for Thought a été choisi pour être exposé à la Sheridan Gallery.

 

 

Share

Air Ware: One Product Designer’s Glass Exploration

by Jamie Gray

 

This past year, I have been attending the graduate program of the glass department at the University of Edinburgh, where I met a product design student named Tao Shen, who is just completing her Masters of Fine Arts degree. I first encountered Tao when she was constructing moulds in the plaster workshop, and we got chatting. I’m glad that happened because, not only is she a very nice person, but the results she ended up getting with her glass experiments were quite amazing and it has been wonderful getting both a close-up view of them and access to discussions about her findings.

 

 

Product design student, Tao Shen

Product design student, Tao Shen

 

Tao comes from Tongxiang, China. This is a long distance from Edinburgh, Scotland, both geographically and in traditions. Tao says that she decided on Edinburgh, from a list of universities which offered her acceptance to their post-grad programs, mainly because of the culture and the architecture styles. Her undergrad was in packaging engineering, which focused on math, physics, material exploration, manufacturing, drawing and graphic design. It was not a great leap from there to product design, with her studies of packaging materials providing a natural lead-in to product material explorations.

 

 

Photo by Tao Shen

Photo by Tao Shen

 

With an abundance of materials to choose from when looking at options to explore, Tao says she chose glass because it’s beautiful and fragile. In this beauty, however, she noticed that glass can be quite densely heavy, and she wished to explore possibilities to create a lighter-weight version so that it could be more easily used in domestic settings. When she learned that glass is being recycled in Edinburgh (used in industrial applications and road construction), she became interested in creating a household glass product that would contribute to the reduction of glass waste by recycling it. She contacted a glass recycling firm who agreed that she could have as much crushed, clean bottle glass as she wanted. The glass they offered happened to be green, which is why her resulting pieces are that colour.

 

Photo by Tao Shen

Photo by Tao Shen

 

Tao decided to create utilitarian objects for the home, using glass cast into moulds. She used the traditional method of lost-wax casting so that she could melt the crushed, recovered glass into the moulds. Into the pre-melted glass, she mixed a foaming agent in order to see if she could end up with a few bubbles and perhaps decrease the overall weight of the glass. The result was astonishing. The glass behaved much like aerosol foam insulation, expanding in such a way that the moulds often broke during the firing. Not deterred with a result that would have had many glass artists going back to square one, Tao carried on, taking a further step to have the university glass technician, Ingrid Philips, blow clear glass into them in the hotshop in order to create vases and drinking vessels.

 

Photo by Tao Shen

Photo by Tao Shen

 

The result, Air Ware, is light and foamy, with an inner texture like bread and about a third the weight you’d expect for the size. The glass is not difficult to cut with a saw and is easily coldworked. Tao says that the product is really just for show at the moment; not entirely safe for domestic use as the porous texture can tend to crumble (like stale bread), and plaster from the moulds is easily caught in the crevices.

 

Photo by Tao Shen

Photo by Tao Shen

 

With a career in product design ahead of her, Tao says she would use glass again if the opportunity arose, but she is also looking forward to trying out other materials such as concrete, wood and clay. She has an internship in her immediate future and hopes to work for a furniture design company in the long-term. It will be very interesting to see if she can create a lighter-weight concrete!

 

 

Many thanks to Tao Shen, who cheerfully endured merciless quizzing about her processes and shared her findings quite freely. She is just completing the second year of a two year Masters in Design at the University of Edinburgh and welcomes further discussion at taoshen1990@hotmail.com.

Jamie Gray is from Calgary and has just completed her first year of a two year Master of Fine Arts in glass at the University of Edinburgh. She is blogging at https://jmcdonaldgray.wordpress.com/.

 

 

 

Air Ware: L’exploration du Verre par un Designer Industriel

par Jamie Gray

 

Cette année, pendant que j’étudiais à l’Université d’Edimbourg dans le département verre, j’ai rencontré Tao Shen, une étudiante en design industriel qui prépare un Master en Beaux-Arts. J’ai fait sa connaissance alors qu’elle créait des moules en plâtre dans l’atelier et nous nous sommes mises à discuter. Je suis ravie de cette rencontre, car en plus d’être très sympathique, les résultats qu’elle obtenait dans son travail avec le verre étaient impressionnants et j’ai trouvé très intéressant de pouvoir observer à ses côtés  ses réalisations.

 

Etudiante en design industriel, Tao Shen

Etudiante en design industriel, Tao Shen

 

Tao vient de Tongxiang en Chine. C’est assez loin de l’Ecosse, à la fois géographiquement et culturellement. Tao dit que dans la liste de toutes les universités qui lui proposaient de venir, elle a choisi Edimbourg principalement pour son style architectural et sa culture. Elle avait auparavant étudié l’ingénierie du conditionnement qui se concentrait sur les maths, la physique, l’exploration des matériaux, l’industrie, le dessin technique et le design industriel. De là à se pencher sur la conception des produits, il n’y avait qu’un pas à franchir et sa connaissance technique des matériaux l’ont tout naturellement conduite vers une exploration plus artisanale du sujet.

 

Photo par Tao Shen

Photo par Tao Shen

 

Vu le large choix de matériaux à explorer, Tao m’explique qu’elle a choisi le verre car il est beau et fragile à la fois. Elle a cependant remarqué que le verre était dense et lourd et  a souhaité explorer les possibilités de créer une variante plus légère qui serait plus facilement exploitable dans la conception d’objets domestiques. Apprenant que le verre était recyclé à Edimbourg (soit pour des utilisations techniques ou des travaux de construction), elle s’est alors intéressée à la création d’objets en verre qui contribueraient à la réduction des déchets au recyclage. Elle est parvenue à obtenir d’une entreprise de recyclage du verre de lui fournir autant de verre pilé et  propre que nécessaire. Le verre qui lui est apporté est vert, ce qui donne à ses œuvres une couleur similaire.

 

Photo par Tao Shen

Photo par Tao Shen

 

Tao a créé ainsi des objets utilitaires pour le quotidien, en fondant le verre dans des moules. Elle utilisait la méthode traditionnelle de la cire perdue pour faire fondre  dans des moules le verre pilé récupéré. Afin de réduire le poids du verre, elle a eu l’idée de créé des bulles en ajoutant un agent moussant au verre pré-fondu. Le résultat était étonnant. Le verre s’est comporté comme de la mousse sortant d’un aérosol, se déployant parfois tellement que les moules se brisaient à la cuisson. Pas découragée pour si peu, tandis que plus d’un artiste aurait baissé les bras au vu des premiers résultats, Tao a persévéré et a demandé à Ingrid Philips, technicienne du verre à l’université, de souffler le verre dans ses moules pour créer des vases et des récipents.

 

Photo par Tao Shen

Photo par Tao Shen

 

Le rendu, Air Ware, est léger et écumeux, avec une texture ressemblant à l’intérieur du pain et pesant environ un tiers de ce à quoi on pourrait s’attendre pour des objets de cette taille. Le verre est facile à couper à la scie et peut être travaillé à froid. Tao prétend qu’à l’heure actuelle, le concept n’est destiné qu’à être exposé au public. Il n’est pas totalement sûr pour l’usage domestique car sa texture poreuse a tendance à s’émietter (telle du pain rassis) et le plâtre des moules entre facilement dans les aspérités.

 

Photo par Tao Shen

Photo par Tao Shen

 

Dans cette carrière en conception de produits industriels qui l’attend, Tao pense qu’elle utilisera volontiers le verre à nouveau, mais elle se réjouit aussi à l’idée de tester d’autres matériaux tels que le béton, le bois et l’argile. Elle doit effectuer stage bientôt et espère à terme pouvoir utiliser ses compétences pour une entreprise de création de meubles. Je me demande si elle parviendra à créer un béton plus léger !

 

 

Un grand merci à Tao Shen qui a pris plaisir à répondre à toutes mes questions et a librement partagé ses découvertes avec moi. Elle termine sa 2e année d’études à l’Université d’Edimbourg dans le cadre d’un Master en Design et se tient disponible pour nous renseigner : taoshen1990@hotmail.com.

Jamie Gray est originaire de Calgary et vient d’achever sa première année d’étude pour un Master des Beaux-Arts en verre à l’Université d’Edimbourg. Elle tient un blog : https://jmcdonaldgray.wordpress.com/.

 

 

Share
//