Lessons we Learn from Glass

June 30, 2016

Author: Diana Fox

I’ve been a volunteer for GAAC since 2010 and my main contribution has been interviewing GAAC members for content for the GAAC Facebook page. Since our first interview back in December 2010, I’ve connected with over 60 GAAC members.

 

As much as our members are all unique and special in both the work they create and the contributions they make to the Canadian glass community, there are commonalities that keep us all drawn together. Perhaps in another six years I will be able to provide some charts or Venn diagrams to illustrate these, but in the interim, allow me to provide some insights I have gained about Canadian glass artists over the last six years.

 

Bastian, Ward. Highlights 13, Light Jet Print Rear-mounted on Plexi-glass, 2011. (Photo Ward Bastian)

Bastian, Ward. Highlights 13, Light Jet Print Rear-mounted on Plexi-glass, 2011. (Photo Ward Bastian)

 

Everyone has a reason for coming to glass and everyone has a reason for staying with it, but not everyone came to it on purpose.

The first question that everyone gets asked is what brings them to glass in the first place and, while there are numerous artists who identify glass’ specific qualities as the thing that drew them in, there are just as many artists that come across glass serendipitously or totally by accident. The commonality amongst everyone is that once they’ve discovered glass, there is no going back. People who fall in love with glass do so because there is no other material that can communicate what they need or want to say. Christy Haldane summed this experience of discovering glass accidentally nicely: “Like many glass artists before me, I started at Sheridan College with every intention of becoming a furniture maker. For our first year, first project, Kevin Lockau asked us, “what is god?” and that intrigued me. I wanted to answer that question more than I wanted to make furniture. The vocabulary that glass offers has played a role in my interest in glass as a material.”

 

Haldane, Christy.  It Takes a Village (excerpt from African Proverb), Glass, concrete, reclaimed dock wood and steel, 2012. (Photo Parks Canada)

Haldane, Christy. It Takes a Village (excerpt from African Proverb), Glass, concrete, reclaimed dock wood and steel, 2012. (Photo Parks Canada)

 

No one talks about glass the way they talk about any other material—if you didn’t know better, you really would think that glass was a living thing that you wrangled into an artwork or object.

Perhaps this is the nature of the material itself: glass is a notoriously finicky material to work with and it requires very specific conditions to accomplish specific results. Ward Bastian articulated this beautifully when he was interviewed in May 2011: “it is a profound experience to work with a material that moves so freely when it’s hot, but is so unbending once it cools.” Working with these unusual qualities—and ultimately having to make enough sense of them to create something—leaves a mark on all of us and we each come away with our own understanding of what glass is as material. This concept was best described by Julia Reimer: “I think glass is like nature, it has its own way and even when you struggle to control it, it has its own schedule and agenda. It is like a river finding its path around a dam. So I think glass has its own properties and, to work with it, you have to consider that. It can be pretty tolerant of what you impose upon it but you have to account for its own nature.”

 

Reimer, Julia.  Cocoon, blown glass, 2012.  (Photo courtesy of Julia Reimer)

Reimer, Julia. Cocoon, blown glass, 2012. (Photo courtesy of Julia Reimer)

 

Glass is not an easy material to work with and no one pretends that it is.

I think it is easy for an artistic lifestyle to get glamorized, but it isn’t something I’ve encountered very frequently amongst GAAC members. I’ve always been struck by the honesty of our members and how willing they are to be so totally forthcoming with the realities of life as a glass artist. It is not easy, it is not always financially rewarding and it is often something we do when we get spare moments from living otherwise busy lives. Certainly other materials come with struggles, but as glass is often a costly material to work with, these struggles are ones I’ve realized are pretty common amongst all of us and something we all have to reconcile in our own individual practices. Jamie Gray spoke to the challenges she faces in her own career: “ok, first of all, as we all know, you don’t make a lot of coin doing this. Seriously, I’d do tons better working for Green Drop. So making enough money to pay for supplies, etc., is probably the biggest challenge. And then, on top of that, how about that huge challenge of making work for the work’s sake instead of for pay’s sake? It’s a circular conundrum. But there it is. We do what we do because we love it so much. I’m even so fortunate as to have a wonderful husband who pays the mortgage and makes sure food gets on the table and gas in the car, but there’s still that societal pressure to “pay your own way” (maybe that’s that puritanical Bible-belt in my head again). I guess that’s what I find to be the greatest challenge: just relaxing and making the work that must be made in order to get my message across and making production pieces as I need to in order to purchase more glass. Most of us are in that spot, I imagine, to one degree or another, at one time or another.”

 

Gray, Jamie.  Telling The Bees, Gaffer lead crystal, brass wire, bee, gold leaf, 2016. (Photo courtesy of Jamie Gray)

Gray, Jamie. Telling The Bees, Gaffer lead crystal, brass wire, bee, gold leaf, 2016. (Photo courtesy of Jamie Gray)

 

Whatever you think glass is, someone out there is using it in a way you never even imagined possible.  

If I have learned anything at all through all my conversations with Canadian glass artists around the country, it is that they are coming up with ways to use glass that are constantly surprising and inspiring. In all seriousness, the work of the GAAC membership is really fantastic. I love scrolling through the profiles on the GAAC website to see the work of our members and it is there that I discovered how virtually every glass artist in Canada takes their own unique approach to glass as a material. From Brad Copping’s mirrored canoe to Teresa Burrows’ exquisite beaded creations, the works of the GAAC membership really challenge the notions of what glass is and can be. Learning about our Canadian glass artists has been a privilege and I encourage everyone to spend some time looking through these interviews—there is much to learn about Canadian glass through them:

 

Ward Bastian was our interviewee May 2011.

Christy Haldane was our interviewee September 2015.

Julia Reimer was our interviewee July 2013.

Jamie Gray was our interviewee July 2011.

 

To read these and other member interviews in full, please visit the GAAC Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Glass-Art-Association-of-Canada-89639673869/

 

Authors Biography: Diana Fox graduated from the Alberta College of Art + Design in 2010.  She has been the Social Media Coordinator for GAAC since that same year.

Leçons que l’on apprend du verre

Auteur: Diana Fox

Je suis une volontaire(bénévole) pour GAAC depuis 2010 et ma contribution majeure est de procéder à des entrevues entre les menbres de GAAC pour le contenu de la page Facebook de GAAC. Depuis notre premiere entrevue en decembre 2010,j’ai fais la rencontre de plus de 60 membres.

 

En fait nos menbres sont tous uniques et spéciaux dans les deux facettes des travaux créatifs et des contributions qu’ils font pour la communauté  Canadienne du verre et ils ont des choses communes qui les  attirent ensemble. Peut-être que dans les 6 prochaines années  je serai capable de vous donner des diagrammes  ou (Venn?) diagrams pour illustrer cet chose mais pour l’instant laissez-moi vous donner un apercu  des  bénéfices que j’ai constaté à  propos des artistes canadiens  de verre depuis c’est dernier 6 ans.

 

Bastian, Ward. Highlights 13, Light Jet Print Rear-mounted on Plexi-glass, 2011. (Photo Ward Bastian)

Bastian, Ward. Highlights 13, Light Jet Print Rear-mounted on Plexi-glass, 2011. (Photo Ward Bastian)

 

TOUT LE MONDE A UNE RAISON DE S’INTERESSER AU VERRE ET TOUT LE MONDE A UNE RAISON DE CONTINUER A S’Y INTÉRESSER  MAIS PAS TOUT LE MONDE S’Y INTÉRESSE  AVEC INTENTION.

La premiere question que tout le monde se fait demander est: qu’est-ce qui vous as incité  à  vouloir travailler avec le verre en premier et tandis que plusieurs  artistes  identifient le verre avec ces qualités  spécifiques  est la chose qui les as attirés ,il y a aussi plusieurs artistes qui découvrent le verre  totalement  par accident.La chose commune entre tous est qu’une fois qu’il on decouvet le verre, il ny a pas de retour en arriere. Les gens qui tombent en amour avec le verre font cela parce qu’il ny as pas d’autre materiaux qui peu communiquer ce qu’ils ont besoin ou ce qu’ils veulent exprimer. Christy Haldane a decrit son experience de sa découverte du verre, comme un joli accident.” Come plusieurs arstistes de verre avant moi,j’ai commencé  mes études  au College Sheridon avec  intention de devenir un fabriquant de meubles. Pour notre première  année ,premier projet,  Kevin Lockau nous a demandé: “Qu’est -ce que Dieu?” et cela ma intriguée. Je voulais la réponse  à  cette  question plus que je voulais fabriquer des meubles. Le vocabulaire que le verre offre a joué  un rôle X dans mes interets avec le verre en fait de materiel.”

 

Haldane, Christy.  It Takes a Village (excerpt from African Proverb), Glass, concrete, reclaimed dock wood and steel, 2012. (Photo Parks Canada)

Haldane, Christy. It Takes a Village (excerpt from African Proverb), Glass, concrete, reclaimed dock wood and steel, 2012. (Photo Parks Canada)

 

PERSONNE NE PARLE DU VERRE DE LA MÊME   MANIERE QU’IL PARLE  D’UN MATÉRIEL  DIFFERENT. -SI VOUS NE LE CONNAISSIEZ PAS MIEUX, VOUS DEVRIER PENSER QUE LE VERRE EST VIVANT ET QUE VOUS POUVEZ LE REFORMER EN UNE PIÈCE  D’ART OU UN OBJET.

Peut-être que c’est la nature du matériel  lui-même. Le verre est un matériel  avec lequel on doit travailler avec minutie et qui requiert  des conditions très particulières   pour accomplir des résultats  specifiques. Ward Bastion a  magnifiquement expliqué cela dans son entrevue de Mai 2011: “C’est une expérience  profonde de travailler avec ce matériel  qui coule si librement quant il est en état  chaud , mais si solide quand il est en état  froid.”  Travailler avec ces qualités  uniques  et créer de façon à donner un sens ultime à  quelque chose  qui nous laisse une marque à  nous tous et nous laisse avec notre propre comprehension de ce qu’est   le verre en fait de matériel . Ce concept est bien décrit  par Julia Reimer:” Je pense que le verre est comme la nature ,il a ses propres manières  et même  si vous luttez à  le contrôler, il a ses propres intentions . C’est comme une rivière  qui trouve son passage autour d’un barrage.Je pense que le verre a ses propres propriétés  et pour travailler avec, vous devez prendre cela en consideration. Il peut-être  vraiment tolérant  à  ce quoi vous lui imposer mais vous devez prendre en considération  de sa propre nature.

 

Reimer, Julia.  Cocoon, blown glass, 2012.  (Photo courtesy of Julia Reimer)

Reimer, Julia. Cocoon, blown glass, 2012. (Photo courtesy of Julia Reimer)

 

LE VERRE N’EST PAS UN MATÉRIEL  FACILE À  MANIPULER ET PERSONNE  NE PRÉTEND  QU’IL NE L’EST PAS.

Je pense que cest facile pour un artiste et son style de vie d’être  prestigieux mais ce n’est pas quelque chose que j’ai rencontré  fréquemment  parmis les menbres de GAAC. J’ai toujours  été  impressionnée  par la sincérité  de nos menbres et être  volontaire à  être  totallement franc avec les réalités  de la vie comme artiste de verre. Ce n’est pas facile ,ce n’est pas toujours financierement récompensé  et c’est aussi souvent quelque chose que l’on fait en consacrant du temps en surplus dans notre vie  qui est deja tres active. Certainement  d’autres matériaux  ont d’autres problèmes  mais le verre est souvent très  dispendieux comme matériel  de travail. J’ai réalisé que ses problèmes  son souvent communs pour nous tous et quelque fois nous devons nous reconcilier avec notre propre pratique individuelle. Jamie Gray a parlé  des defis qu’elle rencontre dans sa propre carrière .”OK en premier comme on le sais on ne fait pas beaucoup de sous a faire cela. Sérieusement, je ferait mieux à travailler pour Green Drop. Alors, faire assez d’argent pour payer  les matériaux ,etc est probablement le plus gros defits. En plus  le tout est de réaliser  une piece  pour sa qualité  au lieu de sa valeur monétaire  cest un cercle vicieux. Mais cela est ce qu’il en ait on fait ce que l’on fait parce que nous aimons cela beaucoup. Je suis aussi tres privilégiée d’avoir un mari merveilleux qui paye l’hypothèque  et s’assure qu’il y a de la nourriture sur la table et de l’essence pour la voiture, mais il y a aussi les pressions sociales d’avoir à  ”payer son propre chemin”[peut-etre que c'est ma religion puritaine dans ma tete encore].Je pense que c’est ce que je trouve être  le plus gros défi : juste relaxer en créant  le travail qui doit être  construit dans un ordre qui délivre  mon message au monde et produise des pieces qui me permettent d’acheter plus de verre. La pluspart de nous tous sont dans la meme position, j’imagine dans un degré  ou un autre, dans un temp ou un autre.

 

Gray, Jamie.  Telling The Bees, Gaffer lead crystal, brass wire, bee, gold leaf, 2016. (Photo courtesy of Jamie Gray)

Gray, Jamie. Telling The Bees, Gaffer lead crystal, brass wire, bee, gold leaf, 2016. (Photo courtesy of Jamie Gray)

 

QUOIQUE   VOUS PUISSIEZ PENSER À CE QU’EST LE VERRE , QUELQU’UN DANS LE MONDE L’UTILISE D’UNE MANIERE TELLE  QUE VOUS NE L’AURIER JAMAIS CRUE POSSIBLE.

Si j’ai appris quelque chose  durant mes conversation avec les artistes Canadiens de verre dans le pays,c’est qu’ils inventent des moyens de se servir du verre qui son constamment curieuses et une source d’inspiration. En toute sincérité, le travail des menbres de CAAG est vraiment fantastique. J’adore regarder les profiles sur le site CAAG à  voir les travaux que les membres  créent et c’est là  que je découvre  comment les artistes Canadiens ont  leur propre approche avec le materiel qu’est le verre. De Brad Copping’s avec son canoe en miroir, de Teresa Burrows’ superbe création  de perle, les travaux des menbres de GAAC vraiment défient l’idée de quoi le verre  peut être . Apprendre à  propos des artistes Canadiens de verre a été  un privilège  et j’encourage tout le monde à prendre le temps de lire   ces entrevues  car il i as’ beaucoup à  decouvrir à  propos du verre Canadien par ces artistes.

 

Ward Bastian a été  en entrevue issue Mai 2011

Christy Haldane a été  en entrevue issue Septembre 2015

Julia Reimer a été  en entrevue issue Juillet 2013

Jamie Gray a été  en entrevue issue Juillet 2011

 

Pour lire ces entrevues au complet et autres s’il vous plaît   visiter le site sur la page de GAAC Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Glass-Art-Association-of-Canada-89639673869/

 

Biographie  de L’auteur:

Diana Fox est graduée  de l’Alberta College des Arts et dessins de 2010.Elle est la coordinnatrice du media social de GAAC depuis cette année .

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MAD Artist Residency

Author: Kate Clements

After completing my MFA in Glass at Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, I was selected to be a part of the Museum of Arts and Design Artist in Residency Program in New York City. The opportunity to transition from the world of academia to the ‘real’ world with a residency in New York was more than I could have hoped for. At MAD I worked in the studio one day a week for four months. The main element of the residency was the interaction of the artist with the public. Every week I would go to work, set up my studio process and open the door from 10AM until 5PM.

 

MAD Studio (2015) (Carli Beseau)

MAD Studio (2015) (Carli Beseau)

 

There were three important components for this residency to work. First was being efficient with time. Because of the open door policy, visitors would constantly stream through the studio. In order to produce work, I had to be able to multi-task.  I would arrive early, fire a kiln that would finish firing in the late afternoon and reload it with what I had worked on throughout the day.

 

Stain (2016) kiln fired glass 96”x 84”x 0.25” (Will Preman)

Stain (2016) kiln fired glass 96”x 84”x 0.25” (Will Preman)

 

By following this procedure, I knew I would have a finished physical object at the end of each day in studio. Second was being generous with my knowledge of artistic process. The only way to get work done was to make it in front of the visitors, which lead to answering questions of how I got from A to B. I would reveal exactly how each piece was made, which is not something you can tell just by looking at the work.

 

Stain Detail (2016) kiln fired glass 96”x 84”x 0.25” (Will Preman)

Stain Detail (2016) kiln fired glass 96”x 84”x 0.25” (Will Preman)

 

This leads to the last component: being able to discuss at length your own artistic theory to a wide audience who may have never studied art or met an artist before.

 

Sofa (2015) 40”x 96”x 48” vinyl treated upholstery, kiln fired beads, plastic beads, sequins, glue (Mike Fleming)

Sofa (2015) 40”x 96”x 48” vinyl treated upholstery, kiln fired beads, plastic beads, sequins, glue (Mike Fleming)

 

Having spent the two previous years in an academic bubble, it was refreshing to discuss my work with such a wide audience. The structure around the residency allowed for me to have an impact on a large and diverse group of people—even if only for a few minutes.

 

Beloved (2016) 48”x36”x 20” glass vitrine, funerary arrangements collected from funerals March 2016 in Philadelphia, (Antony Anderson)

Beloved (2016) 48”x36”x 20” glass vitrine, funerary arrangements collected from funerals March 2016 in Philadelphia, (Antony Anderson)

 

One of the most rewarding parts was when elementary students came through. Their lack of self-consciousness allowed them to ask the most direct and sometimes challenging questions in addition to showing the most awe and excitement about the artwork—something that seems to happen less as we get older.  What might not have been accomplished in physical work during the residency was outweighed by the platform provided by MAD.  This enabled me to engage with the public and introduce or broaden the dialog of what contemporary craft is to an audience that might have been unaware of its existence.

 

 

Author’s Biography:

Kate Clements is an artist whose primary material is kiln-fired glass. She was first introduced to glass in 2007 while working on her BFA at the Kansas City Art Institute and continued her focus by completing her MFA in Glass at Tyler School of Art, where she was awarded a University Fellowship.  She has shown nationally at venues including the DCCA in Delaware, Bullseye Glass Galleries in Portland, OR and the Bay Area, Sherry Leedy Contemporary in Kansas City, the Philadelphia Art Alliance and Pittsburgh Glass Center in Pennsylvania and the Bellevue Arts Museum in Washington State.

 

Her work explores a variety of mediums, including: glass, textile, sculpture and installation. She has completed residencies at the Charlotte Street Foundation in Kansas City and the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City and is the recent recipient of the S12 Glass Studio Residency in Bergen, Norway.

 

Résidence d’artiste au MAD

Auteur: Kate Clements

Après l’obtention de mon diplôme de maîtrise en beaux-arts en verre à la Tyler School of Art de Philadelphie, j’ai été choisie pour participer au programme d’artiste-résident du Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) à New York. Cette occasion de quitter le milieu universitaire pour une résidence dans le « vrai monde » à New York était au-delà de mes espérances. Au MAD, j’ai travaillé à l’atelier une journée par semaine pendant quatre mois. Puisque l’objectif principal de la résidence est l’interaction de l’artiste avec le public, chaque semaine, je me présentais à l’atelier, je m’installais et j’ouvrais les portes de 10 h à 17 h.

 

MAD Studio (2015) (Carli Beseau)

MAD Studio (2015) (Carli Beseau)

 

Trois éléments étaient importants pour que cette résidence porte fruit. L’efficacité était le tout premier. Étant donné la politique de portes ouvertes, les visiteurs allaient constamment défiler dans l’atelier. Pour réussir à produire quelque chose, je devais donc être en mesure d’accomplir plusieurs tâches en même temps. J’arrivais tôt le matin, j’allumais le four qui ne serait prêt qu’en fin d’après-midi, moment où j’y placerais les pièces sur lesquelles j’avais travaillé pendant la journée.

 

Stain (2016) kiln fired glass 96”x 84”x 0.25” (Will Preman)

Stain (2016) kiln fired glass 96”x 84”x 0.25” (Will Preman)

 

En suivant cette routine, je savais que j’aurais un objet physique terminé à la fin de chacune de mes journées à l’atelier. Le deuxième élément important était la générosité – je me devais de partager mes connaissances du processus artistique. La seule façon de réussir à produire quelque chose était donc de le faire en présence des visiteurs et de répondre à leurs questions. Je leur révélais donc comment chaque pièce avait été faite, puisqu’on ne peut pas deviner le processus uniquement en regardant l’œuvre finale.

 

Stain Detail (2016) kiln fired glass 96”x 84”x 0.25” (Will Preman)

Stain Detail (2016) kiln fired glass 96”x 84”x 0.25” (Will Preman)

 

Cela mène au troisième élément : la communication. Je devais être en mesure de discuter en détail de ma propre théorie artistique avec un large public n’ayant peut-être jamais étudié les beaux-arts ou même rencontré un artiste auparavant.

 

Sofa (2015) 40”x 96”x 48” vinyl treated upholstery, kiln fired beads, plastic beads, sequins, glue (Mike Fleming)

Sofa (2015) 40”x 96”x 48” vinyl treated upholstery, kiln fired beads, plastic beads, sequins, glue (Mike Fleming)

 

Puisque je venais de passer les deux dernières années dans un cocon universitaire, c’était rafraîchissant de pouvoir discuter de mon travail avec un auditoire aussi varié. La structure du programme de résidence m’a permis de toucher, ne serait-ce que pour quelques minutes, des groupes variés de gens.

 

Beloved (2016) 48”x36”x 20” glass vitrine, funerary arrangements collected from funerals March 2016 in Philadelphia, (Antony Anderson)

Beloved (2016) 48”x36”x 20” glass vitrine, funerary arrangements collected from funerals March 2016 in Philadelphia, (Antony Anderson)

 

Certains de mes moments les plus gratifiants étaient les visites d’élèves du primaire. Leur absence de gêne leur permettait de me poser des questions directes et parfois même complexes et d’exprimer toute leur excitation et admiration devant une œuvre – cette capacité qui me semble se perdre avec l’âge! Ce que je n’aurais pas pu accomplir en travail physique pendant le temps de résidence a été compensé par la plateforme que m’a fournie le MAD. J’ai pu échanger avec le public et initier ou étoffer le dialogue sur les métiers d’arts contemporains avec un auditoire ne connaissant peut-être pas leur existence.

 

Biographie  de L’auteur:

Kate Clements est une artiste qui travaille d’abord et avant tout le verre thermoformé. C’est en 2007, dans le cadre de son baccalauréat en beaux-arts au Kansas City Art Institute qu’elle a été initiée au verre et elle a poursuivi dans cette direction en complétant ses études de maîtrise en beaux-arts à la Tyler School of Art, qui lui a accordé une bourse universitaire. Elle a exposé ses œuvres dans divers centres et galeries aux États-Unis, dont le DCCA au Delaware, les galeries Bullseye Glass en Oregon (Portland) et en Californie (Bay Area), au centre Sherry Leedy Contemporary de Kansas City, à la Philadelphia Art Alliance et au Pittsburgh Glass Center en Pennsylvanie, ainsi qu’au Bellevue Arts Museum dans l’État de Washington.

 

Son travail explore une foule de médiums et de moyens d’expression : le verre, le textile, la sculpture et l’installation. Elle a effectué des résidences à la Charlotte Street Foundation de Kansas City et au Museum of Arts and Design de New York et elle a récemment été admise au programme de résidence du S12 Glass Studio de Bergen en Norvège.

 

 

 

 

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7 Ascetics – A Family Portrait

Author: Valérie Paquin

 

01.Paquin_7ascetes

 

 

02.Paquin_7ascetes_Isabelle

 

ISABELLE

After seeing the Tiffany exhibition at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Isabelle Alepins was hooked: she just had to work with the fascinating material that is glass. From that moment on, the transparency, illuminating colours and thickness of glass, which create optical effects, have become an important part of her daily routine. Finally, she feels ready to reveal her work, which allies femininity, nature and accumulation, to the viewing of the public. Now here’s someone that is genuinely ready to start a business and who cannot wait to tackle sales and direct marketing with clients. “It is incredibly gratifying to create your own work and then sell it,” she says with a confident look.

 

03.Paquin_7ascetes_Jef


JEF
For Jean-François Boivin, glass is a doorway to the 3D universe. With great commitment, he took almost all of the intensive weekend classes offered at Espace VERRE. One night, he dreamed that he was enrolled in the DEC glass programme. His dream soon became a reality! He, who came to get notions and tips on how to better structure his creativity, can now declare: “mission accomplished!” His passions for astronomy and photography preoccupy him more than ever and are now joined by his chosen material: “exploring glass with a camera is, for me, as fascinating as exploring the universe with a telescope.”

 

04.Paquin_7ascetes_Gwen

                                                                       

GWEN
For our wood elf, Gwenaël Guyot, everything begins in the forest. A Henry David Thoreau of modern times, he wanted to remove himself from the comfort zone of society by putting himself in a survival situation in the middle of La Vérandrye Park. But his theatrical baggage gives him away—Gwen loves words as much as the wilderness: “without being hyperactive, I am always moving.” Moreover, he loves the hyperstructural side of graphic design, programming and the creation of websites. For him, glass is a very contradictory material that matches his own conflicting values. Perhaps he will always try to find harmony between living in the forest and life in the city.

 

05.Paquin_7ascetes_Steph

 

STEPH
Stéphanie Leblond is the self-proclaimed black sheep of the group. Her wardrobe supports this statement. Meticulous to the very last detail, she became a recluse for many hours this semester so that she could sculpt and dress her fantastic figurines, which are inspired by the Alice in Wonderland universe. Her goals in life are measured by the height of her talent: since metal is yet untamed by her, she enrolled in the jewelry making DEC. She also wants to continue working with glass in the Fusion workshop.

 

06.Paquin_7ascetes_Sara


SARA
Sara Mélissa Paniagua is a genuine aesthete who needed to rehash her technical skills. For her, glass offers the perfect conditions needed to create: loss, waste, slowness. This allows her to seize the inspiration of the moment. What does she see in the near future? A residency abroad in Montréal, saving up for a kiln and forming a collective with artistic friends. “When I want something in life, usually, I get it,” she says with a sly grin.

 

07.Paquin_7ascetes_David

 

DAVID
It was with a baggage in fine arts that David came to glass, the only material that gives optical effects. ”I love its delicate side that is simultaneously rough… massive.” It is the experimental process—and the feeling of surprise when you open the kiln—that is the real passion: playing with tests, annealings and creating patterns. His work matured during his 3rd and final year of the DEC, where he came out of his comfort zone. Now armed with all the knowledge acquired at Espace VERRE, he hopes to be accepted as a member of the Fusion programme and develop his own line of products.

 

08.Paquin_7ascetes_Maciej

 

MACIEJ
By means of his studio exploration—random constructions created from the natural movements of molten glass and copper dancing under the effects of the heat—Maciej Geoffroy wanted to represent the futility and instantaneity of emotions. His gestural and intuitive work process was his critique about our contemporary society, but Maciej left us too soon to deliver the conclusion of his reflection. It is with a vow of silence that he has joined the stars.

 

 

7 ASCÈTES | PORTRAIT DE FAMILLE

Auteur: Valérie Paquin

 

01.Paquin_7ascetes

 

 

 

02.Paquin_7ascetes_Isabelle

 

ISABELLE
C’est après avoir vu l’exposition Tiffany au Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal qu’Isabelle Alepins a la piqûre : elle veut travailler cette matière fascinante qu’est le verre. Depuis, la transparence, les couleurs qui s’illuminent, l’épaisseur qui crée un effet optique sont devenus des incontournables de son quotidien. Elle se sent maintenant prête à soumettre son travail, qui allie féminité, nature et accumulation, au regard des autres. En voilà une qui est véritablement prête à se lancer en affaires, et qui a même hâte de s’attaquer à la mise en marché, à la vente et au contact direct avec les clients. « C’est vraiment gratifiant de faire son propre travail et de le vendre, » affirme-t-elle avec son regard confiant.

 

03.Paquin_7ascetes_Jef


JEF
Pour Jean-François Boivin, le verre est une entrée dans l’univers du 3D. Un mordu qui avait essayé presque tous les cours intensifs de fins de semaine offerts à Espace VERRE, une nuit il rêve qu’il s’inscrit au DEC… un rêve qui deviendra réalité! Lui qui était venu chercher des principes et des démarches pour structurer sa création, il se dit maintenant « mission accomplie ». Ses passions pour l’astronomie et la photographie l’habite encore et viennent dorénavant rejoindre sa matière de prédilection :
« explorer le verre avec une caméra, pour moi c’est le même plaisir qu’explorer l’univers avec un téléscope ».

 

04.Paquin_7ascetes_Gwen

 

GWEN
Avec notre elfe des bois, Gwenaël Guyot, tout commence dans la forêt… Henry David Thoreau des temps modernes, il voulait sortir du confort de la société pour se confronter à une situation de survie dans le parc de Vérandrye. Mais son bagage théâtral le trahis – Gwen aime les mots et la scène autant que la nature sauvage : « sans être hyperactif, je suis toujours dans le mouvement ». Il aime aussi le côté hyper-structurel du graphisme, de la programmation et de la création de sites Web. Pour lui, le verre est une matière pourvu de beaucoup de contradictions, qui rejoint bien les valeurs discordantes qui l’habitent. Peut-être cherchera-t-il toujours l’harmonie entre la vie en forêt et la vie en ville?

 

05.Paquin_7ascetes_Steph

 

STEPH
Stéphanie Leblond s’est autoproclamée le mouton noir du groupe. Sa garde-robe vient appuyer l’hypothèse. Méticuleuse jusqu’au bout des doigts, elle s’est recluse maintes heures cette session pour sculpter et habiller ses personnages fantastiques inspirés de l’univers d’Alice au pays des merveilles. Ses ambitions pour l’avenir sont à la hauteur de ses talents : comme il lui reste le métal à dompter, elle s’est inscrite au DEC en joaillerie, et veut continuer à travailler le verre en participant à l’atelier Fusion.

 

06.Paquin_7ascetes_Sara

 

SARA
Sara Mélissa Paniagua est une véritable esthète qui a ressenti le besoin de retourner à la compétence technique. Pour elle, le verre offre les conditions nécessaires à la création : perte, gaspillage, lenteur… il lui permet de saisir l’inspiration du moment. Comment envisage-t-elle l’avenir? En stage à l’étranger, à Montréal en train de sauver ses sous pour s’acheter un four, partir un collectif avec des amis artistes… « Quand je veux quelque chose dans la vie, habituellement, je l’obtiens, » dit-elle avec un sourire en coin.

 

07.Paquin_7ascetes_David

 

DAVID
Avec un bagage en arts plastiques, David Plante vient au verre, le seul médium qui permet des jeux optiques. « J’aime son côté délicat, mais rough à la fois… massif. » C’est le processus d’expérimentation – et la surprise à la sortie du four – qui le passionne véritablement : jouer avec les essais, les cuissons, les motifs. Son travail gagne en maturité pendant sa 3e et dernière année de DEC, où il sort vraiment de sa zone de confort.

Maintenant armé de toutes les connaissances acquises à Espace VERRE, il veut être membre de l’atelier Fusion et développer sa gamme de produits.

08.Paquin_7ascetes_Maciej

 

MACIEJ
Par son travail exploratoire en atelier – des constructions aléatoires faites à travers les mouvements naturels du verre en fusion et du cuivre dansant sous l’effet de la chaleur –, Maciej Geoffroy cherchait à représenter la futilité et l’instantanéité des émotions. Sa démarche gestuelle et intuitive était le reflet de son regard critique sur notre société contemporaine, mais Maciej nous a quittés trop tôt pour nous livrer le véritable fond de sa pensée. C’est avec un vœu de silence qu’il rejoint les étoiles.

 

 

 

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Life Is Not Always Easy: The Alberta College of Art and Design

Author: Robyn Feluch

 

Since 1974, the furnaces and glory holes have heated the depths of the Alberta College of Art + Design. The basement is the home of 36-year glass blowers, casters and fusers—a family of glass artists. As with any family, you assume that members will always be there. But this year our glass department suffered a devastating loss when one of our instructors, Jim Norton, died suddenly on January 28th, 2016. He was a mentor, an encourager, an excellent instructor and a wonderfully talented glass blower. Jim brought a special spark to ACAD Glass that fueled the students to experiment, practice and keep creating. The department, which is a close knit group of 5 instructors, 36 majors and countless students, whom he taught, were left devastated by Jim’s death. But as a true family, we all came together to support each other through this loss. We used our feeling of love and respect for Jim as fuel for our artwork. In Memory of Jim, the ACAD glass department is starting a scholarship in his name. Please visit https://acad.ca/jim-norton to donate to Jim’s memorial fund.

Even with the death of Jim weighing on our hearts, life continues to go on and so did our year. We had a very successful Mug Night. During our Mug Night, some of Jim’s creations were auctioned off to benefit the scholarship in his name.

Our visiting artist this term was Dave Walter. As a department, we were able to watch four different demonstrations by Dave from hot sculpting glass to the techniques involved in enameling his narrative pieces. Along with the skills he showed us, he gave us valuable feedback on what it takes to be a part of the glass industry. I am sure these lessons and insights will stay with us as we continue our individual glass practices. As we finish off our year and graduate 10 of our glass major students into the larger world of glass, we should give a special thank you to all of our talented instructors who give us their support, knowledge and skills in order to help us on our journeys.

 

Wiznura, Declan. Skate or Die (2016) 32”x8”x4” Fused and slumped printed glass

Wiznura, Declan. Skate or Die (2016) 32”x8”x4” Fused and slumped printed glass

 

Wiznura, Declan. Traffic Cones (2016) 8”x8”x7”, 8”x8”x7”, 8.5”x8.5”x8” Blown Glass

Wiznura, Declan. Traffic Cones (2016) 8”x8”x7”, 8”x8”x7”, 8.5”x8.5”x8” Blown Glass

 

Declan Wiznura 
Declan Wiznura combines prints, which are inspired by marks associated with graffiti, with blown glass in order to achieve the patterns he desires on his forms. Glass is produced in a moment that cannot be recreated: there is only one chance at production. Glass is made under pressure, both literally and figuratively. There is one opportunity for success or failure. Graffiti is created in one continuous movement, the marks created cannot be recreated therefore everything is produced in a continuous motion. This moment of creation is a core principle of graffiti culture. Declan has created a series of prints, rollups and pieces based on these ideas using marks found in graffiti. The use of glass powder to print creates a visual texture that is unique to its material. The glass powder also mimics the spray from an aerosol paint can, thus creating a strong visual bond between the influence of graffiti and the finished piece.

 

Gluszak, Brianna. Stigma (2016) Kiln formed and cold worked glass, cement

Gluszak, Brianna. Stigma (2016) Kiln formed and cold worked glass, cement

 

 

Brianna Gluszak

I’ve always found a sense of refuge within the wilderness, naturally it has become the subject of what I make. I often catch myself drawing out the details of different natural materials like wood, rock and water, focusing on the intricacies of the layout and how the material acts. Looking and drawing have become an act of meditation—allowing my mind to escape from the mundane of normal life. Then, approaching making, I use a process of embodied learning. I do a series of experiments and modify my ideas based off of my results. Only then do I start working on a finished product. I use depth and dimension within glass to challenge the viewer’s perception, giving him or her the opportunity to focus solely on looking. Looking acts as a form meditation within my methodologies. Through making I am giving the viewer the opportunity to engage in this form of meditation. The subtitles I place within the glass allow the viewer a further moment of contemplation.

 

Craypo, Taygan. Taffy (2016) hot formed glass

Craypo, Taygan. Taffy (2016) hot formed glass

 

Craypo, Taygan. Carved Taffy (2016) hot formed glass and cold worked glass

Craypo, Taygan. Carved Taffy (2016) hot formed glass and cold worked glass

 

Taygan Crapo 

Glass is hot fluid beauty. To work with glass you must gently direct it towards the outcome that you want. It is like riding an untrained horse, all you can hope for is to guide the forward momentum. Relaxed focus is the key. Hot glass has a hot candy consistency that requires constant motion to avoid disaster. If you miss a twirl or allow the glass to cool too quickly or unevenly, your vases will break into a thousand pieces. But, if your luck holds, you will have a split second that you can admire your vessel before it must be placed in the kiln to prevent shock cracks from forming. It will be at least 12 hours before you can admire it again. That is, if it survives the cooling process.

 

Harrill, Sarah. 1 (2016) Casted glass

Harrill, Sarah. 1 (2016) Casted glass

 

Harrill, Sarah. 2 (2016) Casted glass

Harrill, Sarah. 2 (2016) Casted glass

 

Sarah Harrill 

The Existential and Absurdist philosophies are what motivate my interests and artistic practices. The subject matters in my work are inspired by the nature that surrounds me. The themes explore nostalgic serene experiences that humans instinctively create with and of nature. By using crystal clear glass to cast the hybrid figures, they suddenly become ethereal entities that help confront our perceptions of reality and existence.

 

Feluch, Robyn. Icebergs Series (2016) Blown glass

Feluch, Robyn. Icebergs Series (2016) Blown glass

 

Robyn Feluch 

 

Authors Biography:

Robyn Feluch is a second year glass major at the Alberta College of Art and Design and an accomplished oil painter. Robyn grew up on an acreage in the Alberta foothills where she rode horses, attended 4-h and helped out with the neighbour’s cattle.  She enjoys the western lifestyle and considers herself “a good, clean cut, country gal that loves to paint and create glass.” Her passions include: horses, wildlife, painting and glass work.

 

La vie n’est pas toujours facile: The Alberta College of Art and Design 

Auteur: Robyn Feluch

 

Depuis 1974, fournaises et ouvreaux réchauffent les profondeurs du Alberta College of Art & Design. Son sous-sol héberge une famille de 36 artistes verriers qui travaillent le verre en le soufflant, le coulant et le fusionnant. Comme dans toute famille, on s’imagine que ses membres seront toujours présents. Malheureusement, Jim Norton, un de nos instructeurs, est décédé subitement le 28 janvier 2016. Quelle immense perte pour notre département du verre! Jim était un mentor, un motivateur, un instructeur hors pair et un souffleur de verre merveilleusement talentueux. Il avait cet enthousiasme particulier qui incitait les étudiants à expérimenter, à pratiquer et à continuer à créer. Son décès a littéralement chaviré le département de 5 instructeurs, 36 étudiants à la majeure, et un très grand nombre d’étudiants à qui Jim a enseigné. Mais, tout comme le ferait une vraie famille, nous nous sommes rassemblés pour nous soutenir dans cette épreuve. Notre amour et notre respect pour Jim ont été une source d’inspiration artistique. En mémoire de Jim, le département de verre de l’ACAD a créé une bourse en son nom. Prenez le temps de consulter ce lien pour faire un don au Fonds commémoratif en honneur de Jim : https://acad.ca/jim-norton.

Mais la vie continue, et nous avons poursuivi notre année scolaire malgré notre cœur alourdi par le départ de Jim. Notre soirée Mug Night a connu un vif succès et pendant cet événement, certaines des créations de Jim ont été mises à l’encan au profit de la bourse d’études créée en son nom.

Cette session-ci, Dave Walter était l’artiste invité du département. Nous avons pu assister à quatre démonstrations différentes données par Dave, de la sculpture du verre à chaud en passant par les techniques d’émaillage de ses œuvres narratives. Outre la présentation de ces techniques, Dave nous a aussi renseignés sur ce que ça prend pour faire partie de l’industrie du verre. Je suis certaine que nous n’oublierons pas ces leçons et observations dans le cadre de nos pratiques personnelles. Alors que l’année scolaire se termine et que dix d’entre nous feront leur entrée dans le grand monde du verre, nous devrions remercier tout particulièrement ces talentueux instructeurs qui nous appuient, qui partagent leurs connaissances et leurs talents afin de nous aider dans notre parcours.

 

Wiznura, Declan. Skate or Die (2016) 32”x8”x4” Fused and slumped printed glass

Wiznura, Declan. Skate or Die (2016) 32”x8”x4” Fused and slumped printed glass

 

Wiznura, Declan. Traffic Cones (2016) 8”x8”x7”, 8”x8”x7”, 8.5”x8.5”x8” Blown Glass

Wiznura, Declan. Traffic Cones (2016) 8”x8”x7”, 8”x8”x7”, 8.5”x8.5”x8” Blown Glass

 

Declan Wiznura 
Declan Wiznura combine des imprimés, inspirés de marques associées aux graffitis, avec du verre soufflé pour obtenir les motifs qu’il désire sur ses formes. Le verre est produit en un instant qui ne peut pas être recréé : il n’y a qu’une chance de production. Le verre est produit sous pression, littéralement et figurativement. C’est la réussite ou l’échec. Le graffiti est créé par un mouvement continu. Les marques créées ne peuvent être recréées et tout est donc produit en un mouvement continu. Ce moment de création est au cœur même de la culture du graffiti. Declan a créé une série d’imprimés mis en forme par enroulement, des pièces conçues d’après cette idée d’utiliser les marques retrouvées dans les graffitis. L’utilisation de poudre de verre pour l’impression crée une texture visuelle qui est unique à son matériau. La poudre de verre ressemble aussi à la pulvérisation d’une peinture en aérosol, créant ainsi un lien visuel évident entre l’influence du graffiti et la pièce achevée.

 

Gluszak, Brianna. Stigma (2016) Kiln formed and cold worked glass, cement

Gluszak, Brianna. Stigma (2016) Kiln formed and cold worked glass, cement

 

Brianna Gluszak

La nature a toujours été un refuge pour moi. J’ai toujours trouvé refuge dans la nature. Elle est donc tout naturellement devenue le sujet de mes créations. Je me surprends souvent à dessiner les détails de différents matériaux naturels comme le bois, la roche ou l’eau, et à apporter une attention méticuleuse aux subtilités de la disposition et à la façon dont le matériau agit. Pour moi, l’observation et le dessin sont devenus des actes méditatifs – cela permet à mon esprit d’échapper à la banalité de la vie normale. Puis, quand vient le temps de la création, j’utilise un processus d’apprentissage personnifié : je fais une série d’expériences et je modifie mes idées d’après mes résultats. Ce n’est qu’après que je commence à travailler sur le produit fini. Je me sers de la profondeur et de la dimension au sein du verre pour stimuler la perception du spectateur, lui donnant l’occasion de se concentrer uniquement sur l’observation. L’acte d’observer est une forme de méditation dans le contexte de ma méthode. Par ma création, je donne au spectateur l’occasion de participer à cette forme de méditation. Les sous-titres que je place à l’intérieur du verre offrent au spectateur un moment additionnel de contemplation.

 

Craypo, Taygan. Taffy (2016) hot formed glass

Craypo, Taygan. Taffy (2016) hot formed glass

 

Craypo, Taygan. Carved Taffy (2016) hot formed glass and cold worked glass

Craypo, Taygan. Carved Taffy (2016) hot formed glass and cold worked glass

 

Taygan Craypo 

Le verre est un fluide chaud d’une grande beauté. Pour le travailler, vous devez le diriger avec douceur vers le résultat souhaité. C’est comme monter un cheval non dressé : il faut seulement espérer pouvoir orienter son mouvement. La concentration détendue est la clé. Le verre chaud a la consistance du bonbon chaud; un constant mouvement est requis pour éviter un désastre. Si vous ratez une boucle ou laissez le verre se refroidir trop rapidement ou de façon non uniforme, vos vases vont se rompre en mille morceaux. Mais, si vous avez de la chance, vous aurez une fraction de seconde pour admirer votre récipient avant de devoir le placer dans le four pour éviter la formation de fissures dues au choc thermique. Puis, il vous fait attendre au moins 12 heures avant de pouvoir l’admirer de nouveau, si et seulement si la pièce survit au processus de refroidissement!

 

Harrill, Sarah. 1 (2016) Casted glass

Harrill, Sarah. 1 (2016) Casted glass

 

Harrill, Sarah. 2 (2016) Casted glass

Harrill, Sarah. 2 (2016) Casted glass

 

Sarah Harrill 

Ce sont les idéologies existentielles et absurdes qui m’intéressent et motivent mes pratiques artistiques. Les sujets de mon travail sont inspirés de la nature qui m’entoure. Les thèmes explorent des expériences sereines et nostalgiques que les hommes créent de façon instinctive avec et d’après la nature. En utilisant du verre transparent pour mouler des figures hybrides, elles deviennent soudainement des entités éthérées qui nous aident à confronter nos perceptions de la réalité et de l’existence.

 

Feluch, Robyn. Icebergs Series (2016) Blown glass

Feluch, Robyn. Icebergs Series (2016) Blown glass

 

Robyn Feluch 

 

Biographie de L’auteur:

Robyn Feluch est étudiante en deuxième année de majeure au Alberta College of Art and Design. Elle est aussi une artiste-peintre accomplie. Robyn a grandi sur une terre dans les contreforts albertains où elle se promenait à cheval, était membre des 4H et aidait ses voisins avec leur bétail. Elle aime le mode de vie de l’Ouest et elle se considère comme une vraie fille de la campagne qui adore peindre et créer des articles en verre. Elle se passionne pour les chevaux, la faune, la peinture et le travail du verre.

 

 

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A Fitting End to an Era: The Final Graduating Class of the Sheridan College Advanced Diploma, Crafts and Design, Glass Program

Author: Paola Crossley

 

2016 will be the final year that students graduate from Sheridan College’s Advanced Diploma, Crafts and Design, Glass Program. The college has been a touchstone for the glass community since this program first launched back in 1969. No one could have predicted its longevity or the new direction the college embarked on two years ago when Sheridan first introduced a Bachelor program in Craft and Design. The change brought a shift to a multi-disciplinary approach and the addition of a fourth year. I am part of the new. But I, and the rest of my cohort, owe a huge debt to those who came before.

In a lesser group of people, you might have had discord between the two factions. But not here. As first year students, we must have been as pesky as a young brother or sister trying to keep up. As the wiser older sibling, the third years (as we affectionately call them) were patient, encouraging and supportive. In their own unique way, each one of them has left their mark on us.

I had the privilege of interviewing each graduate for this article. Previously, if you had asked me if I knew them, I would have said yes. In reality, the interviews showed me how little I really knew about them—about what compelled them to work in glass, what inspired them and what their hopes and dreams are for the future.

Some are flameworkers, others are hotshop aficionados and others still are sand and kiln casters. Each one of them approaches glass differently, but what they all have in common are a passion for glass, a commitment to excellence and a desire to just keep working. I encourage you to take the time to read their artist profiles and get to know them as I did—as professionals starting a career in the wonderful world of glass.

 

Cator, Will. Motorcycle (2016), borosilicate glass, 7”H x 3”W x 10”D. (Photo: Will Cator)

Cator, Will. Motorcycle (2016), borosilicate glass, 7”H x 3”W x 10”D. (Photo: Will Cator)


 

Will Cator

Will Cator’s life revolves around motorcycles. He parlayed his passion for these machines into a successful career as a motorcycle wrangler for various movies that are shot in-and-around the Greater Toronto Area. His second love is working with glass. As a flameworker and a sandcaster, his work is inspired by his motorcycle passion and the tools of the trade. His ongoing series of detailed miniature motorcycle sculptures and Harley pendants in borosilicate glass attest to this passion. Lately, he has been focussing on honing his skills by casting life-size wrenches and other tools in blue glass. He desires to continue to focus on his flameworking skills and improve his ability to accurately capture bike culture.

Will anticipates a career that includes glass but is focused on his love of motorcycles. He is happiest when he manages to combine both worlds. Sheridan provided a strong sense of community similar to that of the bike world. This sense of community is what Will foresees missing the most.

www.molassesglass.bigcartel.com

 

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Vase (2016), Incalmo, murrini roll-up, 13”H x 7.5”W x 5”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Vase (2016), Incalmo, murrini roll-up, 13”H x 7.5”W x 5”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

 

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Bowl (2016), sculpted flower hot attached to blown bowl, 6”H x 9”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Bowl (2016), sculpted flower hot attached to blown bowl, 6”H x 9”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

 

 

Geoffrey Crozier

Geoffrey Crozier first started blowing glass when he attended a certificate program at the Haliburton School of the Arts. During his four-month stay at the school, he spent hours practicing glass techniques every day.

From the time of his childhood, Geoffrey has always enjoyed working with his hands. Prior to glass blowing, he developed skills in other mediums such as welding, woodworking, ceramics and sculpting and he continues to explore various mediums today.

While attending Sheridan College, Geoffrey worked with the resident artist, Mathieu Grodet, and soon discovered his love for Venetian glass. Mathieu taught him some of the fundamental skills used in Venetian glassblowing – traditional techniques that Geoffrey intends to continue to explore.

After graduation and a summer session at Pilchuck studying with Debora Moore, Geoffrey plans to travel to both Seattle and Murano to further his knowledge of glass making.

geoffreyjcrozier@gmail.com

 

Davis, Melani. The Rose (2014), kiln cast glass, 15”H x 5.5”W x 2.5”D. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. The Rose (2014), kiln cast glass, 15”H x 5.5”W x 2.5”D. (Photo: Melani Davis)

 

Davis, Melani. Rough Water (2016), fused glass, 18”H x 28”W. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. Rough Water (2016), fused glass, 18”H x 28”W. (Photo: Melani Davis)

 

Melani Davis

Melani Davis discovered a passion for glass later in life, after retiring from her teaching career. Her passion started innocently enough, with a class in beading, and continued with classes in stained glass, fusing and flameworking. These part-time classes only further fueled her devotion. Unsatisfied, Melani decided to embrace her passion and enroll in the Advanced Diploma program for glass at Sheridan.

Melani’s keen observance of the world and the changes that have occurred over her lifetime are the inspiration for the work she creates from fused and kiln cast glass. After losing both siblings and a mother to illness, her current work vacillates between celebrating life and mourning loss. Her Jewish heritage, sustainability and poverty are other themes that Melani continues to explore.

A number of years ago, Melani built a small home studio and gallery where she has the ability to quietly pursue her work and display her craft. Now that she has graduated, Melani intends to expand the scope of her practice and eventually teach flameworking and kiln casting from her studio.

melani.davis@gmail.com

melanidaviscreations.com

 

Di Mascio, Eric. Currents (2016), glass, canvas, 72”H x 24”W. (Photo: Calyssa Erb)

Di Mascio, Eric. Currents (2016), glass, canvas, 72”H x 24”W. (Photo: Calyssa Erb)

 

Di Mascio, Eric. Phantom Limb Calf, (2016), cast glass, prosthetic thigh and foot, 20"H x 5"W x 5”D. (Photo: Eric Di Mascio)

Di Mascio, Eric. Phantom Limb Calf, (2016), cast glass, prosthetic thigh and foot, 20″H x 5″W x 5”D. (Photo: Eric Di Mascio)

 

Eric Di Mascio

Eric Di Mascio’s traumatic childhood has had a profound influence on his work. He was seven years old when his father lost a limb to cancer. The illness was not common knowledge at the time and Eric was alarmed when he returned home one day to find his father physically changed. Doctors could provide a prosthetic limb to increase mobility but they had no solution for the phantom pain that came from the missing limb. The idea of humanizing the prosthetic and providing solace for his torment is what drives Eric’s work.

Eric creates his sculptural work using both kiln and sandcasting methods. He is influenced by classical ideals and he uses these influences as he strives to breathe life into the limbs of his Phantom Pain series. “I am interested in capturing a pure, raw feeling that can be both beautiful and sad.”

Eric’s dream is to share his love of glass with others. He intends to advance his glass studies with the potential of entering teacher’s college in the future. In addition to his Phantom Pain work, Eric will continue to explore ways of capturing static movement in his installation work.

dimascio.eric@gmail.com

 

Fayad, Hannan. Untitled (2016), blown glass, sandblasted, 11” H x 11” D. (Photo: Hannan Fayad)

Fayad, Hannan. Untitled (2016), blown glass, sandblasted, 11” H x 11” D. (Photo: Hannan Fayad)

 

Hannan Fayad

Inspired by the effects of erosion and the texture of timeworn materials, Hannan Fayad replicates this condition by sandblasting the exteriors of her blown glass pieces. She began with the notion of creating indents, craters and small holes on the surface. Over time, she perfected the technique to create her signature luminous, hole-filled orbs. The end result is a study of light and shadow play that continues to fascinate her.

Hannan came to Sheridan excited about the prospect of learning to blow glass. She enjoys the logical aspect of working glass, but her focus remains firmly rooted in the myriad of creative possibilities that the material provides. Skill development and experimentation are important, not only in her hot shop work, but also in the work she creates by sandcasting over organic materials. She is intrigued by the possibilities these processes provide for her ongoing exploration of texture.

Hannan will be heading back to London, ON, with the hopes of forming a small artist collective with her ceramicist partner. In the meantime, she is looking to purchase a sandblaster to continue experimenting with her spheres. Future work includes creating installation work with her forms.

hannanfayad@gmail.com

 

Ferguson, Reid. Jacob Street (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.5”H x 10.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. Jacob Street (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.5”H x 10.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

 

Ferguson, Reid. KW Railroad Set- (left to right) King and Victoria, Strange Street, Westmount and Westwood, (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.75”H x 8.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. KW Railroad Set- (left to right) King and Victoria, Strange Street, Westmount and Westwood, (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.75”H x 8.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

 

Reid Ferguson

Reid Ferguson can trace his love of graffiti art back to his youth when he was first exposed to Shepard Fairey, the American contemporary street artist, graphic designer, activist and founder of OBEY Clothing. Shepard proved that graffiti and urban decay could be beautiful. Reid is inspired by the discarded, often-ignored areas where graffiti artists ply their trade. These hidden nooks and crannies provide alone space and instill him with a sense of connectedness and spirituality that others find in church.

He explores these ideas in his work. His fused glass and concrete bowls are layered with found and created imagery that Reid further manipulates. He also creates graphic statements using standard graffiti techniques such as the throw-up: a technique using a one colour outline and one colour fill. Although a throw-up is traditionally used for quick execution, Reid’s work is often a mediation on his desire for connection.

Reid will continue working in glass while exploring other mediums including using found objects. After all, he believes that you, “don’t need high quality materials to create work. Work with what you have and do something with that.” This is the ultimate manifestation of a practice based on urban decay.

reidhferguson@gmail.com

 

Ireson, Dani. Segment (2016), sandcast, graphite cast, and laminated glass, 15” H x 2.75” W x 2.75” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Segment (2016), sandcast, graphite cast, and laminated glass, 15” H x 2.75” W x 2.75” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

 

Ireson, Dani. Soft Mountain (2016), laminated float glass and stone, 4” H x 3.5” W x 1.5” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Soft Mountain (2016), laminated float glass and stone, 4” H x 3.5” W x 1.5” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Dani Ireson

During a recent road trip through California, Dani Ireson was captivated by the rock striations that seemed to emphasize the passage of time. Inspired by a desire to make permanent that which is fleeting, Dani created a series of works using laminated glass and rock. The use of found and mixed-media materials is typical of her work as she regularly explores new processes, materials and techniques.

Dani enjoys everything about glass, from the team aspect of the hot shop to the meditative state of coldworking. She successfully combines her knowledge of glass blowing, hot sculpting, sandcasting and coldworking with other materials to create decorative and functional works. But it is the creation process itself that she enjoys the most. “Breathing life into glass and watching it change in front of you is an experience I will never tire of.”

Dani enjoys sharing her love of glass and her knowledge with other students. She hopes to one-day parlay into a teaching role. For the time being, she is focusing on developing her skills while assisting Paull Rodrigue in his Dundas, ON studio and building a small coldworking shop in her home.

www.danielleireson.com

ireson.aout@gmail.com

Instagram – @Danielleiresonglass

 

Kimber, Loni. in(FINITE) (2016), blown glass, concrete, 27.5” H x 5.7” W x 6.5”D. (Photo: Loni Kimber)

Kimber, Loni. in(FINITE) (2016), blown glass, concrete, 27.5” H x 5.7” W x 6.5”D. (Photo: Loni Kimber)

 

Loni Kimber

Like most curious children, Loni Kimber just wanted to touch things and push all the buttons—literally. This playfulness comes through in her work as a glass blower, fuser and kiln caster. Her vibrant, fused half-spheres just beg to be touched while her sculptural works focus on movement, light and the bright candy-inspired colours she remembers from her youth. Just like a curious child, Loni creates by making mistakes, choices, experimenting and embracing happenstance.

Loni had an opportunity to incorporate all of these interests during a recent class at Urban Glass in Brooklyn where she studied neon. Her tube series attempts to capture the colour, line, shape and aspect of light that neon provides but without the limitations of working with the material.

Next steps for Loni include heading to Pilchuck this summer to study with her idols Anna Mlasowsky and Matthew Szösz. After that, she sees herself continuing her glass exploration by learning from others and cultivating any opportunity that presents itself. “Relationships will make the difference and I am excited about the future.”

lonikimber@gmail.com

 

Legere, Angela. Yvonne (2016), fused glass body cast, 19”H x 14” W (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Yvonne (2016), fused glass body cast, 19”H x 14” W (Photo: Angela Legere)

 

Legere, Angela. Nesting Bowls (2016), cast glass, Set of 3 – 6”D, 8”D, 10”D. (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Nesting Bowls (2016), cast glass, Set of 3 – 6”D, 8”D, 10”D. (Photo: Angela Legere)

 

Angela Legere

After three years at Sheridan, exploring glass making in all its forms, Angela Legere found a passion for mold making. This technical and inherently reflective process provided an outlet for her work on gender equality and human rights issues. As a sharp observer of human nature, Angela explores these themes in her Fertility series with body castings of the female form. “From lovers’ hands and babies’ feet to full body torsos, I find capturing moments in time a very rewarding process.”

Although Angela no longer lives in British Columbia, her functional work is inspired by the natural beauty of the mountains and ocean she remembers from that time. She feels a similar sense of awe when she works with glass.

After graduation, Angela is looking forward to travelling. She hopes to further her understanding of the issues faced by those less fortunate and discover the common threads that connect us all. On her return, Angela will be moving her practice to South River, ON, where she has an opportunity to set up a small studio and where she will be able to provide classes for local enthusiasts.

www.legereglass.com

legereglass@gmail.com

 

Lepiez, Christian. Ninja Pendant (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, 2” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Ninja Pendant (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, 2” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

 

Lepiez, Christian. Holy Balls (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, various sizes from 3” to 6” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Holy Balls (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, various sizes from 3” to 6” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

 

Christian Lepiez

Christian Lepiez discovered glass during a co-op at Glen Williams Glass. Once at Sheridan, it was the technical expertise and precision required that attracted Christian to flameworking. He quickly improved his skills by first replicating the work of others and then finding a way to express his experiences, memories and passions through glass.

Christian’s approach is very meditative and zen-like. He believes that working with glass requires a truth to materials and being open to where it takes you. “I have a rough idea of what I want to do but I let the glass do its own thing.” Using only heat and gravity, he allows the glass to determine the direction. A favourite technique uses dot stacking to create pendants with spider dots, swirls and patterns in graphic colours, which are inspired by skateboard culture. Lace work is another area where he excels.

Christian intends to continue exploring flameworking at his small home studio. He looks forward to experimenting with new techniques and finding opportunities to incorporate recycled glass in his work.

www.lpzglass.bigcartel.com

lpzglass@hotmail.com

 

Leung, Phebe, Mitty Scolds Bitties (2016) Blown glass, hot sculpted, crocheted, 4.7”H  x 5.5”W x 10”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Mitty Scolds Bitties (2016) Blown glass, hot sculpted, crocheted, 4.7”H x 5.5”W x 10”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

 

Leung, Phebe, Feather Bowl (2016), blown glass, 3”H x 4”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Feather Bowl (2016), blown glass, 3”H x 4”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Phebe Leung

Phebe Leung is a woman who embodies playfulness. This can be seen in everything from her hair accessories to her cell phone cover. But this playfulness is especially evident in her whimsical approach to glass. Named after her partner’s nickname, the Mitty series was inspired by both her partner and Phebe’s unique view of the world. “I don’t see people as people, I see them as animals—he seems like a chicken.”

Along with the Mitty series, Phebe enjoys deviating from the standard hot shop forms by creating three-sided vessels. She also delights in the simple beauty of the hot sculpted roses she creates and the blown bowls and paperweights that she finishes with a variety of sandblasting and coldworking techniques.

Phebe enjoyed the sense of community and teamwork that came from being at Sheridan. She feels Sheridan was time well-spent and is interested in returning to complete the bachelor’s program in the near future. In the meantime, she intends to rent studio space and focus on making fused pendants, other kiln cast forms and, with any luck, continuing the Mitty series.

leungph@sheridanc.on.ca

 

Nathan Lister

Nathan Lister doesn’t remember a time when he wasn’t interested in glass. Growing up near the Sandra Ainsley Gallery, he was exposed at an early age to the beauty of glass and the many ways it can be formed. He began his career with a home flameworking set-up before enrolling at Sheridan. Once at Sheridan, he continued working with a torch but soon discovered the hot shop and the possibilities of hot sculpting.

Nathan strives to mimic both the natural and mechanical worlds using symmetry and a variety of techniques such as heat sinks, concentric rings and repetition. He is currently exploring pushing Marias and the attractive effects that can be obtained with repeating these rings—forms that can simulate both bamboo and industrial glass insulators. Nathan also enjoys exploring form in everything from paperweights to jewelry, beads and other items, which he creates in flameworking. To expand his techniques, he works on unique hot sculpted objects, which can vary from aliens to sharks.

Nathan finds the process and production of glass work enjoyable. He will continue to refine his skills and seek new techniques as he ramps up his home studio.

nathanlister1@gmail.com

 

Lozanovski, Lila. Satori 5.2 (2014), float glass, cotton thread, 9.8”H x 13.75”W. (Photo: Jade Chittock)

Lozanovski, Lila. Satori 5.2 (2014), float glass, cotton thread, 9.8”H x 13.75”W. (Photo: Jade Chittock)

 

Lozanovski, Lila. Rose Bowl (2015), kiln cast glass, 5.5”H x 4.75”D x 4.75”W. (Photo: Lila Lozanovski)

Lozanovski, Lila. Rose Bowl (2015), kiln cast glass, 5.5”H x 4.75”D x 4.75”W. (Photo: Lila Lozanovski)

 

Lila Lozanovski

Lila Lozanovski’s passion for glass is fed by the act of making. The process provides her an opportunity for quiet introspection and the freedom to delve into the question of why she feels compelled to create. The work provides comfort and inevitably becomes a marker of her state of mind at that moment. Although Lila currently focuses on kiln and sandcasting, she refuses to be limited by the use of specific materials in her search for answers.

A large part of Lila’s work incorporates roses—sometimes formed in clear glass, other times designed as a multi-hued carpet of blooms—and pedestals, which signify an openness, a desire to share and also a form of respect for the preciousness of the objects held within the bowls. The roses that proliferate to form bowls and bases are crafted by hand-rolling wax into shape. The marks left by her hands are a reminder that beauty lies in imperfection. Unlike the ephemeral moments of our lives, Lila’s roses permanently remain at their peak.

Lila has big plans for the future. First, she is heading to Pilchuck this August for a class with Bryan Jablonski, a glass fabrication specialist. Next, Lila has accepted the role of Teaching Assistant at Sheridan for the 2016/2017 year. But she is most excited about her future plans that include a studio designed as a community hub. Her dream is to engage with the community and other like-minded artists to build a truly unique live/work space where she can collaborate and spend time unleashing the full potential of her creativity. “I don’t want to stop making.”

lilaanks@yahoo.com

 

Walsh, Collin A.G. Kameosa (Sake Set), (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, Bottle - 10”H x 1 - 2.25”D, Glasses - 2.5”H x 2.5”D. (Photo: Chace Diargino)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Kameosa (Sake Set), (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, Bottle – 10”H x 1 – 2.25”D, Glasses – 2.5”H x 2.5”D. (Photo: Chace Diargino)

 

Walsh, Collin A.G. Head Shots, (2014-15), flameworked borosilicate glass, various from 1” – 2.5”H x .75”D. (Photo: Nicholas Driver)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Head Shots, (2014-15), flameworked borosilicate glass, various from 1” – 2.5”H x .75”D. (Photo: Nicholas Driver)

 

Collin Walsh

Collin Walsh is an introspective flameworker who feels that a study of glass provides greater benefits than just the skills learned. As cliché as it sounds, he believes the Sheridan Glass program made him a better person. “I am grateful for Koen [Vanderstukken – Sheridan Glass Studio Head and professor] and Brad [Sherwood – flameworking instructor]. They shaped me as a flameworker but also as a human being and how I see the world.”

Collin was immersed in handcraft from a young age. His mother was a dressmaker, his maternal grandfather was a woodworker and painter and his paternal grandfather was a metalsmith. With an interest in the heritage of craftsmanship, Collin strives to recreate traditional forms with a contemporary twist that manifest from his fascination of the mysterious, mystical, bizarre and surreal. He populates his work with the absurd, such as ghouls and goblins, and brings them to life with his painterly approach to colour.

Collin foresees a gratifying future spent trying to convey his understanding of the world through his glass practice. He will continue his journey at his home flameworking studio.

collinwalsh.cw@gmail.com

www.unclethrasher.bigcartel.com

 

Yule, Max. Glass Flora (2016), hot sculpted glass and cement, 18”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Glass Flora (2016), hot sculpted glass and cement, 18”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

 

Yule, Max. Untitled (2016), hot sculpted glass welded frame, 20”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Untitled (2016), hot sculpted glass welded frame, 20”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Max Yule

Max Yule came to glass because of beer. His interest was first piqued when he watched a colleague at the small brewery where he worked craft drinking cups from the beer bottles. This discovery led to a journey that saw Max move from bead making to a semester-long hotshop program at Haliburton School of the Arts and then on to Sheridan.

His current work focuses on sculptural hanging pieces created in the hot shop and flameworking objects that embrace a scientific aesthetic, which harkens back to his days at the brewery. He is fascinated by everything from the bubbling processes that occur during lab experiments to lab tools and other industrial materials. He intends to merge his two aesthetics into work that redefines the notion of what a chandelier is.

Max is first and foremost a pragmatist. He enjoys both the process and the challenge of working in glass but it is his realization that glass artists need supportive environments in order to flourish that is the driving force behind his latest project. He is in the midst of creating a live/work space in Oshawa for flameworkers with an expected launch date later this year. This type of forward-thinking will ensure there are opportunities for artists to continue to explore glass both today and in the future.

maxcyule@hotmail.com

 

Authors Biography:

Paola Crossley is thrilled to be part of the first group of students in the Sheridan Bachelor of Craft and Design program. She is will be entering her third year of the four-year program this fall.

 

Une époque qui se termine bien: L’ultime promotion du diplôme d’études collégiales en métiers d’art et design –  option verre) du Sheridan College  

Auteur: Paola Crossley

L’année 2016 sera la toute dernière année où des étudiants obtiendront leur diplôme d’études collégiales en métiers d’art et design, option verre, du Sheridan College. Le collège a été une pierre de touche pour la communauté du verre depuis le lancement de cette option en 1969. Personne n’aurait pu prédire la longévité du programme ni la nouvelle direction que le collège a adoptée, il y a deux ans déjà, en créant un programme de baccalauréat en métiers d’art et design. Ce changement s’est concrétisé par une approche pluridisciplinaire et l’ajout d’une quatrième année d’études.

Je suis une des étudiantes de ce nouveau programme, mais tout comme le reste de ma cohorte, je suis extrêmement reconnaissante à ceux et celles qui m’ont précédée.

Dans un autre groupe, il y aurait peut-être eu de la discorde entre les deux factions. Pas dans notre cas. En première année, nous étions probablement un peu embêtants, comme de jeunes frères et sœurs voulant suivre à tout prix. Mais les étudiants de troisième année (comme on aime bien les appeler) se sont montrés patients! Ils nous ont encouragés et soutenus comme l’auraient fait des aînés de famille plus sages. Chacun d’entre eux, à sa façon, a laissé sur nous son empreinte.

Pour cet article, j’ai eu le privilège d’interviewer chaque étudiant diplômé. Avant cela, si vous m’aviez demandé si je les connaissais, j’aurais répondu que oui. En réalité, les entrevues m’ont montré que je savais peu de choses à leur sujet. J’ai appris ce qui les avait incités à travailler le verre, ce qui les avait inspirés et quels étaient leurs espoirs et leurs rêves pour l’avenir.

Certains d’entre eux travaillent au chalumeau, d’autres sont des passionnés de l’atelier de verre à chaud et d’autres encore préfèrent le coulage dans le sable et le moulage dans les fours. Chacun a sa façon unique d’aborder le matériau, mais ce qu’ils ont tous en commun c’est une passion pour le verre, un engagement envers l’excellence et le désir de simplement continuer à y travailler. Je vous invite donc à prendre le temps de lire leurs profils d’artiste et à les découvrir tout comme je l’ai fait – en tant que professionnels qui entament leur carrière dans le merveilleux monde du verre.

Cator, Will. Motorcycle (2016), borosilicate glass, 7”H x 3”W x 10”D. (Photo: Will Cator)

Cator, Will. Motorcycle (2016), borosilicate glass, 7”H x 3”W x 10”D. (Photo: Will Cator)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Vase (2016), Incalmo, murrini roll-up, 13”H x 7.5”W x 5”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Vase (2016), Incalmo, murrini roll-up, 13”H x 7.5”W x 5”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Bowl (2016), sculpted flower hot attached to blown bowl, 6”H x 9”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Bowl (2016), sculpted flower hot attached to blown bowl, 6”H x 9”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Davis, Melani. The Rose (2014), kiln cast glass, 15”H x 5.5”W x 2.5”D. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. The Rose (2014), kiln cast glass, 15”H x 5.5”W x 2.5”D. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. Rough Water (2016), fused glass, 18”H x 28”W. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. Rough Water (2016), fused glass, 18”H x 28”W. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Di Mascio, Eric. Currents (2016), glass, canvas, 72”H x 24”W. (Photo: Calyssa Erb)

Di Mascio, Eric. Currents (2016), glass, canvas, 72”H x 24”W. (Photo: Calyssa Erb)

Di Mascio, Eric. Phantom Limb Calf, (2016), cast glass, prosthetic thigh and foot, 20"H x 5"W x 5”D. (Photo: Eric Di Mascio)

Di Mascio, Eric. Phantom Limb Calf, (2016), cast glass, prosthetic thigh and foot, 20″H x 5″W x 5”D. (Photo: Eric Di Mascio)

Fayad, Hannan. Untitled (2016), blown glass, sandblasted, 11” H x 11” D. (Photo: Hannan Fayad)

Fayad, Hannan. Untitled (2016), blown glass, sandblasted, 11” H x 11” D. (Photo: Hannan Fayad)

Ferguson, Reid. Jacob Street (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.5”H x 10.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. Jacob Street (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.5”H x 10.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. KW Railroad Set- (left to right) King and Victoria, Strange Street, Westmount and Westwood, (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.75”H x 8.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. KW Railroad Set- (left to right) King and Victoria, Strange Street, Westmount and Westwood, (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.75”H x 8.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ireson, Dani. Segment (2016), sandcast, graphite cast, and laminated glass, 15” H x 2.75” W x 2.75” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Segment (2016), sandcast, graphite cast, and laminated glass, 15” H x 2.75” W x 2.75” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Soft Mountain (2016), laminated float glass and stone, 4” H x 3.5” W x 1.5” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Soft Mountain (2016), laminated float glass and stone, 4” H x 3.5” W x 1.5” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Kimber, Loni. in(FINITE) (2016), blown glass, concrete, 27.5” H x 5.7” W x 6.5”D. (Photo: Loni Kimber)

Kimber, Loni. in(FINITE) (2016), blown glass, concrete, 27.5” H x 5.7” W x 6.5”D. (Photo: Loni Kimber)

Legere, Angela. Yvonne (2016), fused glass body cast, 19”H x 14” W (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Yvonne (2016), fused glass body cast, 19”H x 14” W (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Nesting Bowls (2016), cast glass, Set of 3 – 6”D, 8”D, 10”D. (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Nesting Bowls (2016), cast glass, Set of 3 – 6”D, 8”D, 10”D. (Photo: Angela Legere)

Lepiez, Christian. Ninja Pendant (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, 2” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Ninja Pendant (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, 2” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Holy Balls (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, various sizes from 3” to 6” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Holy Balls (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, various sizes from 3” to 6” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Leung, Phebe, Mitty Scolds Bitties (2016) Blown glass, hot sculpted, crocheted, 4.7”H  x 5.5”W x 10”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Mitty Scolds Bitties (2016) Blown glass, hot sculpted, crocheted, 4.7”H x 5.5”W x 10”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Feather Bowl (2016), blown glass, 3”H x 4”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Feather Bowl (2016), blown glass, 3”H x 4”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Lozanovski, Lila. Satori 5.2 (2014), float glass, cotton thread, 9.8”H x 13.75”W. (Photo: Jade Chittock)

Lozanovski, Lila. Satori 5.2 (2014), float glass, cotton thread, 9.8”H x 13.75”W. (Photo: Jade Chittock)

Lozanovski, Lila. Rose Bowl (2015), kiln cast glass, 5.5”H x 4.75”D x 4.75”W. (Photo: Lila Lozanovski)

Lozanovski, Lila. Rose Bowl (2015), kiln cast glass, 5.5”H x 4.75”D x 4.75”W. (Photo: Lila Lozanovski)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Kameosa (Sake Set), (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, Bottle - 10”H x 1 - 2.25”D, Glasses - 2.5”H x 2.5”D. (Photo: Chace Diargino)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Kameosa (Sake Set), (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, Bottle – 10”H x 1 – 2.25”D, Glasses – 2.5”H x 2.5”D. (Photo: Chace Diargino)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Head Shots, (2014-15), flameworked borosilicate glass, various from 1” – 2.5”H x .75”D. (Photo: Nicholas Driver)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Head Shots, (2014-15), flameworked borosilicate glass, various from 1” – 2.5”H x .75”D. (Photo: Nicholas Driver)

Yule, Max. Glass Flora (2016), hot sculpted glass and cement, 18”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Glass Flora (2016), hot sculpted glass and cement, 18”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Untitled (2016), hot sculpted glass welded frame, 20”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Untitled (2016), hot sculpted glass welded frame, 20”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

 

Biographie de L’auteur: 

Paola Crossley est très contente de faire partie du premier groupe d’étudiants au programme de baccalauréat en métiers d’art et design du Sheridan College. Elle entamera la troisième année de son programme de quatre ans à l’automne.

 

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Glass Gathering 2015

Author: Stephanie Baness

 

In September of 2012, Megan Smith and Sylvie Jensen organized the first Glass Gathering at Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario. The event was planned as an opportunity for glass artists to get together and spend the day socializing, participating in the Glass Olympics, watching demos, attending lectures and bidding on fabulous (primarily) glass items at the silent auction. To add to the enjoyment, the Sheridan Alumni Association generously hosted a catered lunch for the event.

 

The Glass Gathering has grown steadily since 2012. Last year was the busiest gathering yet, with 300 attendees arriving from the U.S. and all across Canada.

 

Glass Gathering 2015 was packed with a diverse array of demos, speakers and events. One of the first highlights of Glass Gathering 2015 was the lecture by Philip Vinson & Chuck Wells from The Mobile Glassblowing Studios in Georgia. They discussed the creation of their portable furnace, Little Dragon Glass Furnace, took questions from the audience, then lead everyone down the hall for a demonstration of the furnace. Throughout the day, everyone was encouraged to try the furnace out by making cups, which annealed in 60 minutes using the Continuous Annealing Tube (CAT-60) that is attached to the furnace.

 

Phillip Vinson and Chuck Wells with the Little Dragon Glass Furnace. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Phillip Vinson and Chuck Wells with the Little Dragon Glass Furnace. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

The hot shop at Sheridan College was the center of activity with demonstrations throughout the day that attracted crowds of attendees. In the morning, the demos included Koen Vanderstukken presenting two-part sand molds and Patrick Primeau creating a blown vessel. Alyssa Getz and Tommy Cudmore created a Loveguin, to the delight of the spectators. In the afternoon, Sue Rankin, Sally McCubbin, Blaise Campbell and Silvia Taylor created a gorgeous floral vase, followed by a high octane “Squirrels” demo from Angus Powers with his team of students from Alfred University.

 

Blaise Campbell entertaining the crowd. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Blaise Campbell entertaining the crowd. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

The flameworking studio had nonstop guest demos in both the soft and borosilicate glass mediums: bead making, ornament blowing and finishing techniques. The American Scientific Glassblowers Society wrapped up the day with interesting torch and lathe demos.

 

Even the kiln studio hosted activities, including Kasia Czarnota’s demo, “Multi-Part & Hollow Core Moulds,” Fantasy in Glass’ presentation, “Glass Fusing, Slumping & Reactives” and Roxanne Tocher’s “Wax Folding” Demo.

 

For those attendees who wanted to sit down for a bit, the lecture room provided a great alternative to the activity in the other studios. The lecture series included talks by Jessie Trott and Jim Elliot, Josh Hershman, Caroline Ouellette, Catherine Labonté, Leana Quade and Angus Powers. The lecture series ended with a spirited panel discussion, “Can Pipes be Art?” As a grand finale, Alfred Engerer entertained us with a short film, “I’m not Jeff, Jeff’s my brother”—a hilarious recounting of how strangers continuously mistake him for Jeff Goldblum.

 

Catherine Labonté addressing the audience. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Catherine Labonté addressing the audience. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

The final event of the day was the Glass Olympics with five teams competing for bragging rights and mini trophies. Always a crowd favorite, this year’s event did not disappoint. The teams made amazing pieces and showcased incredible skills and talent. In the end, everyone went home a winner.

 

Teams get organized for Olympics. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Teams get organized for Olympics. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Ken Hockin (left) and Justin Adams (right) getting creative. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Ken Hockin (left) and Justin Adams (right) getting creative. (photo by Andrew Synders)

The sand casters show off their mad skills. (photo by Andrew Synders)

The sand casters show off their mad skills. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

One young event goer summed up the day with her hand written note:

 

Hand written note by Adriana (photo by Andrew Synders)

Hand written note by Adriana (photo by Andrew Synders)

The Glass Gathering 2016 will be on September 10, 2016.

For more information of attending please visit: http://glassgathering.com/

For information on getting involved, please visit: http://glassgathering.com/GetInvolved

 

 

Authors Biography:

Stephanie Baness moved from Chicago to enroll in the glass program at Sheridan College. She has completed her studies and is working on beginning her new life in glass.

 

 

Reunion du verre 2015

Auteur: Stephanie Baness

En septembre 2012, Megan Smith et Sylvie Jensen on organisé  la première  reunion de verre a Sheridan College, à  Oakville en Ontario. L’événement  a été une opportunité  pour les artistes en verre de se réunir   et partager une journée  pour fraterniser  entre eux. Ils ont  participé   à  une Olympique  de verre, suivi des ateliers, assisté  à  des lectures et ont eu  l’opportunité  de participer à  une enchère  silencieuse  de verre . Pour  aider à  l’événement,  l’association des gradués de Sheridan  à organisé  un repas fourni  par un restorateur pour l’événement .

L’événement  du verre est en  progression depuis 2012. L’an dernier  a été  le rassemblement le plus fréquenté  avec plus de 300 personnes venues des Etats-Unis, et de plusieurs régions du Canada.

Le regroupement  du verre 2015 a acueilli des orateurs  ,de demontrastions diverses  et beaucoup d’événements . Le premier  des événements  spéciaux   a été  la présentation donnée  par Phillip Vinson et Chuck Wells qui  viennent de “ The Mobile Glassblowing Studios” en Georganie . Ils ont discute de  la creation de leur four portable, nommé  “ Little Dragon Glass Furnace”,ils ont repondu à  des  questions de l’audience   puis ils ont  invité les participants à une démonstration  du fourneaux . Durant  la journée, les gens ont été  invités à  essayer  le fourneau  en fabriquant des tasses qu’ils pouvaient  faire refroidir lentement  en 60 minutes en utilisant un tube  appelé  “Continuous Annealing Tube(CAT-60)”. Ce tube est attaché  aux fourneaux .

 

Phillip Vinson and Chuck Wells with the Little Dragon Glass Furnace. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Phillip Vinson and Chuck Wells with the Little Dragon Glass Furnace. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

Durant la journee, le studio  de four à  Sheridan College a été  le centre d’activités  avec des démonstrations qui ont attiré  un grand nombre de personnes. Durant la matinée, la démonstration  a inclus Koen Vanderstukken qui a présenté deux parties   sable encastrées et Patrick  Primeau qui as créé  un verre soufflé. Alyssa Getz et Tommy Cudmore créèrent  un “LOVEQUIN” au grand plaisir des spectateurs. Durant l’apres midi, Sue Rankin, Sally McCubbin, Blaise Campbell et Silvia Taylor ont créé un merveilleux vase floral suivi d’une démonstration d’octane à  haute température  “squirrels” par Angus Powers avec son équipe  d’étudiants de l’Université Alfred.

 

Blaise Campbell entertaining the crowd. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Blaise Campbell entertaining the crowd. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

Le studio des chalumeaux a été tres occupe:  des démonstrations   sur le médium  du verre tendre et le verre borosilicate : fabrication de perles de verre, ornements soufflés  et techniques de finition. L’association américaine  scientifique de verre soufflé  a terminé  la journée  avec des démonstrations  intéressantes   de chalumeaux  et  de travail sur un tour.

Le studio de fourneaux  a présenté  beaucoup d’activités qui incluent Kasia Czarnota avec la présentation  de Part et Hollow Core  Moulds. La présentation  “ Fantaisie en verre”, ”Verre  soudé  ,fondu et réactivité ”. La demonstration de Roxanne Tocher “Cire plie”.

Pour les participants qui voulaient se reposer , un peu la chambre  de lecture a parmi aux invités  un bonne alternative aux activités dans les studios. La serie de lecture a inclus des présentations  par Jessie Trott et Jim Elliot, Josh Hershman, Caroline Ouellette, Catherine Labonte, Leana Quade et Angus Powers. La serie de lecture  s’est terminée  avec une discussion  animée  sur le sujet de la question: est-ce que les tubes peuvent etre considérés  comme art?. En grande finale, Alfred Engerer nous as divertis avec son court film “je ne suis pas Jeff, Jeff est mon frere”,  une comédie  qui raconte comment les étrangers  le confondent toujours à  Jeff Goldblum.

 

Catherine Labonté addressing the audience. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Catherine Labonté addressing the audience. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

Le dernier événement  de la journée  a  été  les Olympiques du verre avec quatre équipes qui se sont partagé les honneurs et les petits trophées . Comme toujours, pour leur activité favorite de l’événement  les participants n’ont pas étés désappointés: Les équipes  ont fabriqué  des pièces  magnifiques  et ont démontré des qualités de travail et talents incroyables. Finalement,  tout les gens son retournés chez eux gagnants.

 

Teams get organized for Olympics. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Teams get organized for Olympics. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

Ken Hockin (left) and Justin Adams (right) getting creative. (photo by Andrew Synders)

Ken Hockin (left) and Justin Adams (right) getting creative. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

The sand casters show off their mad skills. (photo by Andrew Synders)

The sand casters show off their mad skills. (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

Une jeune  participante décrit  bien le résultat  de la journee  avec sa note écrite.

 

Hand written note by Adriana (photo by Andrew Synders)

Hand written note by Adriana (photo by Andrew Synders)

 

Pour la Reunion du verre en 2016 l’événement  sera le 10 Septembre 2016

Pour plus d’informations pour  participer, visitez le site : http://glassgathering.com

Pour plus d’information  pour aider à  l’evenement, visitez le site :http://glassgathering.com/Getinvolved

 

 

 

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Student Help: From the Archives Spring 2004

Author: Benjamin Kikkert

 

As the promise of spring draws near, the idea of how to spend the summer is crossing hundreds of glass students’ minds. What to do? Where do all the glass people live in the summer?

Well, maybe they live right next door. Glass students come from right across North America. From Vancouver to Montreal to Texas, there are students wondering what they can do after school. How do they carry their passion for glass away from an institutional environment and apply it in the “real” world? This is where seeing it done by an established professional could be a real help. Hello GAAC membership, anyone out there?

Some great advice I’ve received is to get out and see as many different glass studios as possible. The variety of approaches and the openness of the people I’ve encountered in these situations have been astounding. Although I study at Sheridan in Ontario, at the GAAC conference in Toronto and at the GAS conference in Seattle last summer, I met dozens of friendly (and totally off the wall) Canadian glass people I had no idea were around at all. It’s one thing to hear about it, it’s quite another thing to meet people actually doing it every day. I gained an appreciation for a glass “family” that I didn’t know I even had!

On behalf of glass students across the country, can we meet you people? Hello! We’re a pretty keen bunch, you know—educated—and we’re right next door! Opening your studio for a student to see would be a great way to meet the people who are going to be working around you for years to come. And who knows? Maybe you could use some summer help. Or were you looking forward to cold working through July? Students are in this because we love it and maybe some of that enthusiasm can help you out. We are keenly aware that the learning doesn’t end when we finish our courses. Sharing your experience with a student could provide a valuable experience for both parties. You might be surprised at how interested we are in hearing what you’ve learned as you “got to know the ropes” of this glass thing. Ever considered hiring an apprentice? Maybe it’d be nice to find some help that understands that a punty is something other than a kick in the bum!

So get to know us! Contact your Canadian glass schools, from wherever you are and get to know the young glass workers who are emerging today. In the next issue of this magazine, we will be introducing the graduating class of 2004 from each major Canadian glass school. There could be a whole crop of qualified, dedicated individuals just waiting to work with you! Whether an introduction, a summer job or a great opportunity for everyone to get to know each other better, let’s all be friends, okay?

See you this summer!

 

Student Help: From the Archives Spring 2004

Auteur: Benjamin Kikkert

 

Avec arrivée prochaine du printemps, les projets pour organiser l’été commencement à traverser l’esprit des étudiants verriers. Quoi faire? Et d’ailleurs, où vivent les artistes verriers pendant l’été?

Et bien, ils sont peut-être vos voisins. Les étudiants verriers viennent de partout à travers l’Amérique du Nord. Que ce soit de Vancouver, Montréal et même du Texas, il y a des étudiants qui se demandent ce qu’ils feront après leurs études. Comment transformer cette passion pour le verre apprise à l’école et l’appliquer dans la « vrai » vie? C’est alors que voir un professionnel à l’œuvre pourrait être très bénéfique. Hé, vous les membres du GAAC, y a-t-il quelqu’un à l’écoute?

Le meilleur conseil que j’ai reçu à date, c’est d’aller visiter le plus grand nombre possible d’ateliers professionnels. Les approches de travail sont variées et l’ouverture d’esprit des gens est étonnante. Bien que je sois étudiant au Collège Sheridan en Ontario, j’ai fait la connaissance, aux conférences du GAAC à Toronto et du GAS à Seattle l’été dernier, de douzaines de verriers canadiens, aimables et quelquefois excentriques dont j’ignorais l’existence. C’est une chose d’en entendre parler, mais c’est plus stimulant de prendre contact directement avec ces gens. J’ai enfin pris conscience d’une « famille » que j’ignorais avoir!

De la part de tous les étudiants canadiens, pourrait-on vous rencontrer? Nous sommes un groupe enthousiasmé vous savez, bien éduqué qui vit près de chez vous! En laissant entrer un étudiant dans votre atelier, vous courrez la chance de rencontrer quelqu’un de bien qui va sans doute un jour travailler dans votre entourage. Qui sait? Vous avez sûrement besoin d’un stagiaire pendant l’été. Espériez-vous faire du verre à froid tout le mois de juillet? Nous étudions le verre parce que nous aimons ça, alors cet enthousiasme pourrait peut-être vous être utile? Nous sommes conscient que l’apprentissage ne s’arrête pas avec la fin des cours. Le partage de vos expériences pourrait créer un échange stimulant pour nous tous. Nous sommes très intéressés à tout connaître de votre propre cheminement et de votre perfectionnement de l’art verrier.

Avez-vous pensé d’embaucher un stagiaire? Quelqu’un qui sait déjà à quoi sert un pontil. Apprenez à nous connaître! Contactez l’une des écoles canadiennes de verre, peu importe où vous étés aujourd’hui. Lors du prochain numéro du Verre Contemporain Canadien, nous ferons la présentation de diplômés 2004 des qualifies, dédiés qui ne demandent qu’a travailler avec vous! Que ce soit par une rencontre, un stage d’été ou de longue durée, c’est le bon moment pour se connaître mutuellement. Soyons tous des amis, d’accord?

On se voit cet été?!

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