Lifetime Service and Lifetime Achievement Awards: Jeff Goodman and Irene Frolic

June 15, 2013

By: Jamie Gray

Over the years the Glass Art Association of Canada has honoured very special members of the community for the efforts that they have made, which have been for the benefit of our community, and we have also honoured artists within our community for the work that they have created.  The Lifetime Service and Achievement Awards honour those of our members who have dedicated much time and energy to helping nurture the richness and creativity of the glass art community and whose efforts, by doing so, continue to enhance the national community.

It is tradition that we present these awards at our national conferences once every two or three years.  Though we had to cancel the conference we planned for Calgary this year, we are dedicated to continuing on with the awards.  The two recipients will be receiving the awards as soon as those are completed, and they and/or their families will be invited to attend the next conference to be recognized publicly.

When we search for nominations for our award recipients, we go to the Board of the Glass Art Association of Canada, heads of craft organizations and heads of college glass departments.  This year, we had many glowing nominations for Jeff Goodman for the Lifetime Service Award and Irene Frolic for the Lifetime Achievement Award.  I can do no better than point to two of the highest accolades.

01 Lifetime Service and Achievement Awards

Irene Frolic

In nomination of Irene Frolic, Alex Anagnostou, volunteer coordinator for the Glass Art Association of Canada, wrote:

As the new volunteer coordinator, I am so thrilled to be a part of this process with GAAC. I would like to nominate Irene frolic for Lifetime Achievement award for her body of work in glass.

Irene’s work is powerful. It speaks of her history as a holocaust survivor and the history of her family and she expresses a deep sense of humanity in her figurative work. I’m particularly touched by this body of work as it has developed. Not only are they beautiful forms, showing an incredible knowledge of glass opacity, translucency and transparency, but the forms are rich and have an enduring timeless quality. In addition these pieces are very large for kilncast glass, a technical feat that she has developed largely self-taught in the early years. I also admire her wall pieces with glass used as script over a drawing. She is very successful at shows internationally with collectors (although this is not necessary for this type of award). I am also so impressed that she continues to participate in GAAC shows, showing a large piece of abstract glass sculpture at the Last Glass show, showing with artists who are emerging and established, and still striving for new forms, a lifetime of amazing expression.

In addition, during a presentation about figurative work by Tina Oldknow, Curator at Corning Museum of Glass, in Chicago, she presented Irene’s work as exemplary in its portrayal of the human condition. In effect, she made me proud to know Irene Frolic as a colleague, as an artist, and as a Canadian. It was the first slide she showed in her review of international figurative artwork.

As a role model, Irene has had a presence throughout the 10 years that I have been practising as a glass sculptor. She showed up when I was photographing some of my work at Sheridan College and took time to give supportive comments about my work. In addition, she frequents shows such as Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition to see what other artists are doing in glass. She takes time to provide feedback and gives you courage to pursue your ideas. In addition, Irene gave me some advice about how to present my work at the Art Toronto show, about making a Wow piece covering a whole wall. It is these interactions, unplanned and unexpected, that make you want to keep creating work.

Jeff Goodman

Jeff Goodman

In nomination of Jeff Goodman, Koen Vanderstukken, head of the glass department at Sheridan College, wrote:

For the Lifetime Service award, I would like to nominate Jeff Goodman. Jeff was a long standing and well respected member of the glass community. From the start he was involved in teaching and in helping his peers, as a resident in Harbourfront, as a teacher in the glass studio at Sheridan College and later, in his own studio. Up to only months before he passed away, he invited all graduating students to visit his studio and show them what could be realised. Jeff was also supportive to many young ambitious graduates. Building up his own career and managing his business, he always remained very open towards others and helpful where he could. In an ever growing studio, he offered temporary and permanent working opportunities for many young graduates who could learn and take their first steps into a professional world while making a living. But also many professionals learned vital information from him or worked for or with him. Jeff served as a member on the GAAC Board. As one of the members of Ten North, he helped put Canada on the map internationally and, by doing so, opened new gateways for other Canadian artists looking for international recognition. With his architectural work and especially the Bahai Temple project, he opened up new territory. By doing so he’s been a prime source of inspiration for the Canadian glass scene, proving that it is possible to successfully engage in the most ambitious projects. Even facing death, he made sure that those who he worked with were encouraged before passing away. His passion, determination and professionalism remain a continuous source of inspiration to every Canadian involved with glass.

Please join us in our most sincere congratulations and gratitude to Irene and Jeff for all they’ve contributed to the Canadian glass scene.  We are so proud of both of them and aspire to grow in our own practices to join them in achieving great and wonderful things.

Share

FROM THE ARCHIVES

When I go back to look at past issues of the Glass Gazette and Contemporary Canadian Glass, a rich written heritage is evident.  We’ve talked about ourselves as Canadian glass artists, glass artists from elsewhere, every technique going, all events going.  We’ve covered it.  It’s great to get into the archives and dig out a few of the many treasures to share with you.  In light of the recent retirement of one of Canada’s glass icons, I couldn’t resist reprinting an article written in 1995 about Robert Held.

Jamie Gray

 

Robert Held:  Looking Back, Looking Forward

Paula Gustafson

Spring 1995, Glass Gazette, Page 6

There’s a rueful edge to Robert Held’s laughter when he suggests that he would be retired by now if he had stayed at Sheridan College, “in a cushy little job as a teacher in the centre of the glass world.”  Instead, at 52, he regularly works ten hour days running one of the largest and busiest glass art studios in North America.

With the expert assistance of Danny Vargas, Held produces over 100 blown glass vessels a day.  They are the hot team, Held says.  Robert Parkes and Michael Kuhlmey produce most of the studio’s Art Nouveau line.  Another team makes the press-mold objects.  Altogether there are 18 people working in Held’s Vancouver studio, eight of them full-time glassblowers.

“I work from 7 am to 5pm, four days a week with Danny, and then another two days either on my own glass work or on studio business,” Held says.

Watching Held wield a blowpipe is like seeing a mature Nureyev perform on a stage lit by roaring hellfire and orchestrated by Wagnerian thunder.  The musical accompaniment is the studio’s ever-blaring stereo, but the fire is real.  Seven red hot glory holes punctuate the workshop’s charged atmosphere.  In the centre, a white-hot glow radiates from the 2300 degree F melt furnace, while four annealing kilns click and buzz like digitalized engines.

“We out-produce probably all but one or two of the American glassblowing studios,” Held says.  There is no doubt that his studio is the largest of its kind in Canada.  His nearest competition is just across the border in Seattle, where glass studios have proliferated as exponentially as Micro-software and Starbuck coffee shops.

Held’s success as a major producer of art glass began in 1978 when he set up Skookum Art Glass in Calgary.  “I started out with just myself and with Jeff Burnette as my gaffer,” Held recalls.  “That’s all I thought I would do, just what the two of us could make.”  Now he says he sells glass to almost 2000 gift shops and galleries across the United States and Canada.

When Held moved his business from Calgary to Vancouver in 1986 he was caught up in the possibilities of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement.  “At that time I thought the smart thing to do was West Coast marketing., exporting to California where there was already a ready-made market for glass, and all I’d have to do is offer a competitive price,’ Held recalls.

Implementing his plan wasn’t quite as easy.  After several years of participating in trade shows in Los Angeles, Honolulu, and San Francisco, he re-evaluated his strategies.  “The East Coast is where all the major buyers go, so we are no longer doing the L.A. gift show.”  He still participates in the San Francisco gift show, “but that’s because I personally like the city.”  In three years of what Held calls “really pushing” into the U.S. market he has done as much business as he did in the previous 15 years of Canadian sales.

“Interestingly enough, a lot of our accounts in the States are catalogue retailers, although we also sell at Gumps, and at Barneys in New York,” Held says.  In Canada, one of his biggest retailers is Birks.  “In the past, Birks’ buyers overlooked local suppliers.  For glass they’d go to Orrefors, or to Kosta Boda.  They’d never look to see what was available right here on their own doorstep.”

When the floundering gift store chain was bought out by a former Marini & Rossi partner, one of the mandates handed to the new management team was to stock more Canadian-made products.  “As soon as they looked, there we were, and they’ve been very good for us,” Held says.

At the same time Held cherishes the smaller business clients he has cultivated over the past 17 years.  “We feel very strongly about not letting go of our smaller accounts,” he says, “because we’ve developed them, loved them, and if Birks ever leaves, we need them.”

Listening to Held talk about loyalty to his client base, it’s apparent he is an educator as well as an artist and businessman.  That’s not surprising.  His first academic degree was in Education.  In the mid-1960’s he taught ceramics at the University of Southern California.

“When I was working with clay and glazes I realized that, even with the most translucent porcelain, you can’t see through it.  The colours you see on ceramics are all reflected light, never transmitted light.  In glass, you’re not only dealing with the surface, you get the whole spectrum.  With glass, your eye goes inside the surface and optically pushes the colours together,” he explains.

Fascinated with glass as an art medium, and determined to share his new-found passion, Held jumped at the opportunity offered by Sheridan College to set up a studio for hot glass.  “In California I had some very good teachers, some of the biggest names in the ceramics world – Peter Voulkos, Paul Soldner – and most of them were production oriented,” Held recalls.  “One of the reasons I was hired to come to Sheridan was they wanted to train Canadian craftsmen to go out and make a living.”

“I was 24, the youngest teacher there.  I could be retired by now.  Instead, I’m still blowing glass, running a business – and sometimes wondering why I didn’t stay in that ivory tower.”

Momentarily the California-born glassblower pauses to consider the “what ifs” of his career choices.  “Canada has been very, very good to me, but if I had done the same things in the States, well, it took Canada 10 to 15 years longer to wake up to the fact that glass is a really viable art medium.  I’m still educating people about it.”

Held also bemoans the shift away from production skill training.  In fact, he prefers to hire “people off the street” rather than art school graduates to work in his studio.  “They want to talk about art theory, how you feel about your work, getting into yourself, and all that sort of stuff.  I have a really hard time with that because, if you look at the really good artists, they all learned their skills first.  With glass there has to be a skill level or you get burned, or cut, or the stuff falls on the floor.  Painting isn’t going to hurt you.  Glass burns you bad.”  As an example, Held cites on of his favourite painters, Jackson Pollock, “the American dribble and drabble guy.”  He says that if you look at Pollock’s early artwork, “he could draw, he could paint, but he broke away from that and went beyond.  Glass is the same thing.  You have to get to a certain level before you can use it to explore and develop and create your own direction.”

Held admits that perhaps his focus on consistently producing marketable glass, and the time he has spent training other glassblowers to competent standards, has hindered his reputation as an artist.  Aside from the gift shows, he seldom exhibits his work.

Does he feel slighted, seeing other glass artists getting the critics’ applause?  “Well, Dan Crichton was a student of mine.  He never wanted to be a production glassblower.  Neither did Karl Schantz, who I brought up from Rochester.  They both had a different view of manipulating glass as a material.”  Yes, he says there is a “little, slight tinge of envy” for the path they’ve taken, but he isn’t looking back with regret.  He’s proud of what he has accomplished and suggests that his choices were “the difference between the real world and a world that is almost make-believe.”

Whatever Held may have deferred in the way of an artist’s fame – a status that he could daily change – he has more than made up for by building a solid international reputation as a producer of art glass.  Students of glass’s history will recall that, a century ago, Louis Comfort Tiffany had a similarly ambitious vision.

Paula Gustafson (1941-2006) was President of the Alberta Crafts Council from 1983 to 1985 when she became Executive Assistant to the President and Board of Governors at the Alberta College of Art.  From 1990-1992 Gustafson was a writer / contributing editor to a variety of Canadian and worldwide publications.  Sharing her experience in the Canadian publishing industry and her extensive knowledge of art and craft, Gustafson traveled all over Canada to give lectures and to take part in forums, conferences and consultations.  During the last few months of her life, working up to within a week of her death due to cancer in 2006, Gustafson was the editor for Galleries West magazine.

Share

Just What I needed! How the GAAC Student Project Grant helped me get started

February 15, 2013

By: Silvia Taylor

 

The GAAC Student project grant has contributed significantly to both my work and my career as an emerging artist. The support and funding allowed me to develop my work throughout the summer after graduation and to produce a refined series for exhibits and shows. Quite simply, GAAC support has helped shape the very nature of my work; and, I would not have been able to launch my career without it.

Dorjee Series 2011-2012, Copper & Glass, 7” x 4” – 4” x 2.5”, Credit: Silvia Taylor

Dorjee Series 2011-2012, Copper & Glass, 7” x 4” – 4” x 2.5”, Credit: Silvia Taylor

Soon after I graduated from Sheridan, it became apparent to me just how significant electroplating would be in my work. My work at Sheridan sparked my interest in the process, and my fascination with the results confirmed that this was the direction I would be taking. But to realize this dream – I knew that, like any craftsman, I needed the `right tools for the job’. And an electroplater was the key tool.

Ogee Compass Series 2012, Copper & Glass, 5” x 2”, Credit: Silvia Taylor

Ogee Compass Series 2012, Copper & Glass, 5” x 2”, Credit: Silvia Taylor

My challenge was that I couldn’t afford one. And, to earn one, would mean working at other jobs at the expense of developing my art. I applied for the GAAC Student Project Grant and was ecstatic when I had learned that I was chosen for the grant. From my research, I learned about the process, components and suppliers. This made shopping for value straightforward.

As, I had been accepted to display my work at several shows that summer, having the electroplater ready to go as soon as possible was essential. Moreover, having the electroplater fully installed made it possible to create my work and experiment with the technology throughout the summer. I played with the positioning of the copper in relation to the glass piece being plated, the intensity of the amperage, the temperature of the acid bed, and many other variables. And, with this careful experimentation, discovered new results. Each experiment I learned some essential dos and don’t of electroplating, and started to really develop an awareness of the process and the effects I could create, and what worked best for each piece.

Untitled, 2012, Copper & Glass, 6” x 3.5”, Credit: Silvia Taylor

Untitled, 2012, Copper & Glass, 6” x 3.5”, Credit: Silvia Taylor

By September, I was able to bring these skills and knowledge back to Sheridan where I was employed as a teacher’s assistant. At home, I continued to explore the technology, I discovered that I was able to create a variety of textures, and control copper `growth’.

Again, this was all achievable because of the grant for the electroplater.  Further, having my own electroplater enabled me to do my own work at home and to keep Sheridan’s electroplater available for students (though I did use it a couple times).

When the Sheridan glass students went to Corning, NY for the first year field trip, I researched information on electroplating from their extensive library. I learned more about the electro-chemistry and trouble-shooting tips for this technology.

I was able to transfer this directly to the first-year students at Sheridan when I taught them the electroplating unit.

And after an entire year of experimenting, failing, succeeding, teaching, and exhibiting I am still left with some left-over materials from the initial grant. It is amazing how much this grant has helped me in the last year and will continue to help me for years to come. Thank you again for such an incredible opportunity, and for investing in my career!

Dorjee Series, 2011, Glass & Copper, 7” x 4”, Credit: Silvia Taylor

Dorjee Series, 2011, Glass & Copper, 7” x 4”, Credit: Silvia Taylor

 

Share

FROM THE ARCHIVES

When I go back to look at past issues of the Glass Gazette and Contemporary Canadian Glass, a rich written heritage is evident.  We’ve talked about ourselves as Canadian glass artists, glass artists from elsewhere, every technique going, all events going.  We’ve covered it.  It’s great to get into the archives and dig out a few of the many treasures to share with you.  In light of our International Issue, I’ve gone back ten years to bring you an article written by Joanne Andrighetti about a flameworking project carried out by James Minson with children in Guatemala. Be inspired!

Jamie Gray

 

From Guatemala With Love

Joanne Andrighetti

April, 2003, Glass Gazette, Volume 3, Number 52, page 27

James Minson is one of North America’s most accomplished flameworkers.  He worked for Ginny Ruffner for years, has exhibited extensively (his next exhibit is at Vetri in December) and is a Pilchuck regular.  So I was surprised to learn in a recent conversation with him that his torch was cold much of the time these days.  “Well, I’m pretty busy at school, and of course I’m still working with the kids.”  Kids?

James explained that while working as a TA at Pilchuck in the summer of 2001, he befriended student Elsa Asturias from Guatemala.  Taking her up on her offer to visit her, he went to Guatemala that November.  While touring around on the last day of his visit, she suggested they stop by a children’s home run by her friend Leonor Portela.

The Misioneros del Camino in Sumpango is home to 40 children, who range in age from babies to 22 years old.  They are all indigenous kids who have been orphaned, abandoned, or assigned by the courts to be cared for by the mission.  James was captivated by the children in a way that took him totally by surprise.  He learned that although they receive a basic education, the director was concerned for their future.  They would have to find work in an already lean economy without the benefit of family connections or support.  James offered to teach them the skill of flameworking.

He returned to Seattle and began to make arrangements.  Noted Seattle philanthropists Jon and Mary Shirley donated $10,000, and in March of 2002 James was back in Guatemala to set up the studio.

For his first demo, James asked the kids what they would like to see made.  When they all shouted out “Mickey Mouse,” James realized he would need to talk to them about ideas and culture along with technique.  “There was an amazing exhibition of pre-Columbian art in Antigua which I took the kids to see.  I explained to them that when they send their finished work out into the world it should say something about who they are and where they come from.”

So far, they have learned to make figures such as angels for the churches in Miami that sponsor the home, but James is encouraging unique expression in the group.

All eleven of the kids over the age of twelve are involved in the project.  He returns periodically to provide further instruction, and between visits the children practise and develop designs.  James would love other flameworkers to visit and teach so the students can benefit from a wider range of instruction.  In time, the older children will teach the younger ones.  He expects that the group will be self-sufficient in two years and hopes that they will continue to work together as they enter adulthood and set up a studio nearby.  “It’s a very craft-oriented culture.  Everywhere you go in Guatemala, you see weaving, woodwork, jewellery, and ceramics.”

I asked James what the experience has meant to him.  “I’ve bonded with the kids.  There’s a lot of love.”  In addition, he has been learning about the culture and language.  Although most of the communication so far has been through translators, James is gradually learning Spanish.

Back in Seattle, James is pursuing a degree in psychology from Antioch University.  He plans to return to Guatemala late next year, when no doubt the kids will be eager to show off their latest accomplishments.

If any flameworkers are interested in teaching in Guatemala or if you would like to make a donation, please contact James Minson by phone at 206-328-8813 or by e-mail at jamesminson[at]quest.net or www.jamesminsonglass.com.

Joanne Andrighetti blows glass, flameworks, and sells flameworking supplies in Vancouver, British Columbia.

 

DU FOND DES ARCHIVES

En observant les précédentes éditions de la Glass Gazette et du Contemporary Canadian Glass, il est évident que c’est un héritage écrit riche. Nous y avons parlé de nous-même en tant qu’artistes verriers canadiens, d’artistes verriers venant d’autre part, des techniques à l’emploi, des événements ayant cours. Nous avons tout couvert. C’est intéressant de creuser dans les archives et d’en ressortir quelques-uns des nombreux trésors pour vous les faire partager.

Pour notre Edition Internationale, je suis retournée 10 ans en arrière afin de vous faire profiter d’un article que Joanne Andriguetti a écrit sur un projet de travail au chalumeau avec des enfants du Guatemala qui fut mené à bien par James Minson. Prenez-en de la graine!

Jamie Gray

 

Bons Baisers Du Guatemala

Joanne Andrighetti

Avril 2003, Glass Gazette, Volume 3, Numéro 52, page 27

James Minson et l’un des artistes nord-américains les plus talentueux pour le travail au chalumeau. Il a travaillé pour Ginny Ruffner pendant plusieurs années, a beaucoup exposé (sa prochaine exposition sera à Vetri en Décembre) et c’est aussi un habitué de Pilchuck. Quelle ne fut pas ma surprise lorsqu’un jour il m’avoua que son chalumeau restait souvent éteint ces derniers temps. «  A vrai dire je suis déjà pas mal occupé avec les cours, et puis bien sûr, je travaille toujours avec les enfants. » Des enfants ?

James m’expliqua que durant son séjour en tant qu’assistant à Pilchuck à l’été 2001, il a fait la connaissance d’Elsa Asturias, une étudiante venue du Guatemala.  Prenant son invitation au sérieux, il est allé lui rendre visite au Guatemala en novembre. Tandis qu’il profitait de sa dernière balade touristique, elle lui proposa de se rendre dans un foyer pour enfants, Les Misioneros del Camino à Sumpango recueillent 40 enfants de tout âge, nourrisson jusqu’à 22 ans. Tous sont des enfants indigènes qui sont orphelins, abandonnés ou envoyés par les juges pour être pris en charge. James a été captivé par les enfants de manière très inattendue. Il a compris que malgré leur éducation de base obligatoire, la directrice se sentait très concernée par leur futur. Il leur faudrait trouver du travail dans un contexte économique déjà difficile et cela sans le soutien d’une famille ou d’un réseau. James a alors proposé de leur apprendre l’art du travail au chalumeau.

De retour à Seattle, il s’est débrouillé. Jon et Mary Shirley, illustres philanthropes, lui ont fait don de $10,000 et James a ainsi pu retourner au Guatemala en mars 2002 pour y construire un atelier.

Au cours de sa première démonstration, James a demandé aux enfants ce qu’ils voulaient qu’il crée. Quand ils ont crié « Mickey » à l’unisson, James a compris qu’il lui faudrait parler avec eux de techniques mais aussi d’idées et de culture. « Il y avait à cette époque une très belle exposition sur l’art précolombien à Antigua et je les y ai emmenés. Je leur ai expliqué que lorsqu’ils enverraient leurs œuvres achevées à travers le monde, il faudrait que celles-ci parlent d’eux-mêmes et de leurs origines. »

Pour le moment, ils sont parvenus à réaliser des figurines et des anges pour les églises de Miami qui sponsorisent leur foyer  mais James prône l’expression unique dans le groupe.

Tous les enfants de plus de douze ans participent au projet, ils sont onze. Il y retourne régulièrement  pour parfaire leur  enseignement. En temps voulu, les enfants les plus âgés seront capables d’enseigner aux plus jeunes. Il pense que le groupe deviendra autonome d’ici deux années et espère qu’ils poursuivront leur travail ensemble une fois devenus adultes et créeront leur petit atelier non loin. « C’est une culture très orientée vers l’artisanat. Partout au Guatemala, on y trouve du tissage, le travail du bois, de la bijouterie et des céramiques. »

J’ai demandé à James ce que l’expérience lui avait apporté. « Je me suis lié d’amitié avec les enfants. Il y a tant d’amour. » En plus de ça, il a découvert leur culture et leur langue. Bien que la majorité de la communication se soit faite jusqu’à présent avec l’aide d’interprètes, James progresse en espagnol.

A Seattle, James prépare maintenant un diplôme de psychologie à Antioch University. Il prévoit de retourner au Guatemala vers la fin de l’année prochaine quand les enfants seront prêts et auront surement hâte de lui montrer leurs derniers chefs-d’œuvres.

Si des artistes au chalumeau souhaitent enseigner au Guatemala, ou si vous voulez faire un don, contactez James Minson par téléphone au 206-328-8813 ou par email à jamesminson@quest.net ou www.jamesminsonglass.com.

Joanne Andrighetti est souffleuse de verre, travaille au chalumeau et vend du matériel pour chalumeau à Vancouver, Colombie Britannique. 

Share

FROM THE ARCHIVES

When I go back to look at past issues of the Glass Gazette and Contemporary Canadian Glass, a rich written heritage is evident.  We’ve talked about ourselves as Canadian glass artists, glass artists from elsewhere, every technique going, all events going.  We’ve covered it.  It’s great to get into the archives and dig out a few of the many treasures to share with you.  In light of our upcoming 30th anniversary, I’ve gone back to the time of our 20th anniversary to see what was what in the fall of 2002.  The following is an article written by the at-the-time founders and past presidents of GAAC.  Because it’s lengthy, I’ve broken it into two parts, the first of which was included in the Fall 2012 issue of Contemporary Canadian Glass.  What follows is the second part.   It’s an interesting and insightful read.  Enjoy!

Jamie Gray

 

Comments by GAAC Founders and Past Presidents

PART 2 (Shirley Elford, Laura Donefer, Sheila Mahut, Paulus Tjiang, Ben Goodman, Irene Frolic)

Shirley Elford

It’s hard to believe that we are 20 years old … My, how time flies.

Twenty years and I’m in my fourth studio.  I’ve gone from gas to electric to gas, and now to what I call “my retirement studio.”  All the necessities without the hot shop.  I remember meeting at Max Leser’s house in Toronto, fresh out of school and in awe of the fabulous studio he had.  I find it amazing that now in “my retirement studio” I own his old equipment.  Talk about coming full circle.  It was at that time we began the idea of incorporating the Glass Art Association of Canada.  We had several hoops to jump through to do that.  We wouldn’t be able to apply for financial assistance without being a registered not-for-profit organization.  Lots of hours and time went into identifying what we were about and what we wanted to be.

The first order of business after receiving our status was to connect with our members.  The idea of a publication was foremost in our minds.  We met with Walter Sunahara at the Ontario Arts Council, and with his assistance made our first application for a grant to get us on our feet.  We were the Glass Art Association of Canada.  Our publication had to be bilingual.  We decided on a quarterly newsletter and invited participants from across Canada to write articles.  From east to west, our representatives kept us informed of what was happening in their area of the country.  Our biggest problem was the translation.  Gilles Desaulniers was a big help in translating for us.

Our glass conferences and glass blower picnics are the highlights of my term as president.  I treasure the memories and will always be proud of our beginnings.  There were not many of us 20 years ago, but WOW have we grown.

Laura Donefer

I have been involved with the Glass Art Association of Canada for almost the same amount of time that I have been involved with glass, almost 20 years, so I can say that we grew up together.  While a student at Sheridan College in the early eighties, I was involved in the fledgling organization, but my official treasurer duties (all actually carried out by the accountant behind the scenes, my good and patient partner Dave Hickie) started in 1985.  In 1988, when I became president of the organization, Dave valiantly carried on as treasurer until 1990, when we moved from Toronto to the country.  My main focus with GAAC was to somehow weave the disparate groups of glass artists scattered across Canada into a more cohesive unit.  The idea of getting us all together became rather an obsession, but until Sue Rankin moved in with Dave and me in the mid-eighties, I was not sure how to facilitate my dream.  With roommate Sue being computer literate and with my writing skills, we agreed to take over the publication of the Glass Gazette from Shirley Elford and we began publishing it as a quarterly magazine.  I directed the Gazette until 1995, when daughter duties, teaching, and career took over, but I still manage to write a few articles every year.  To me, the Glass Gazette represents the voice of the Canadian glass artist, and I am very proud of how it has carried on.  When I started out as president, our conferences were few and far between, people from the east had no idea was what going on out west, and there was little communication between us all.  That has really changed!  In the year 2002, I am overwhelmed when I realize that my dream not only came into fruition, but that the GAAC board continues to reach out to join the Canadians with the rest of the glass world and that we are united from coast to coast like never before.  So do your part, write something for the Glass Gazette and keep smiling!

Sheila Mahut

Sheila was not available to contribute to this commentary.

Paulus Tjiang

It was a dark hour for GAAC.  I had been left as the only board member, the treasurer, because no one had stepped forward to serve on the board in four years.  It seemed like all the letters, articles, and phone calls fell on deaf ears.

So, I thought that if GAAC had to fold, it should go out with a bang.  I arranged a members’ survey show at the Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery in Waterloo, called a general meeting, and proposed a party.

An ultimatum was tabled at the general meeting.  New volunteers would have to come forward to serve on the board or I would dissolve the organization after the closing of the survey show.  A short discussion ensued, verging on a yelling match, and a few hands popped up to bear the GAAC torch.  Most notable was Ben Goodman, whose commendable efforts sustained and streamlined the organization through to the passing of the leadership to Irene Frolic.

Looking back, the experience illustrates how tenuous our volunteer organization or group really is.  It’s the actual will and strength of individuals and their actions that truly make greatness.

The Association will only endure with the active participation of individual members with altruistic motives.

Ben Goodman

My involvement on the GAAC board (1994 to 2001) overlapped with exciting changes taking place in my personal life.  After graduating from OCA in the spring of 1990, I was establishing my new career as an artist.  This was just starting to happen for me when I attended a GAAC annual meeting at the Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery in the fall of 1994.  The previous year had not been a good one for GAAC.  Thankfully, Paulus Tjiang, assisted by Karen McKinnell and Alfred Engerer, had formed a “caretaker” board ensuring that GAAC did not fold as an organization.  At the 1994 AGM, Paulus had just put out the challenge to those at the meeting.  I can still hear his fateful words to the effect that if no one came forward to form a new board, then the organization would fold.  With John Robinson prodding me from behind, I tentatively raised my hand and became part of this new board.  As is often said (and it is true), serving on a volunteer board is a thankless task.  You do it because you believe in the organization and what it does for the community it serves.  During my term on the board, we successfully mounted two national conferences – Montreal in 1996 (with a strong local group headed up by Maurice Gareau) and Red Deer in 2000 (organized by Carol Jane Campbell), established a GAAC website, organized all of the GAAC administrative procedures, enhanced the Glass Gazette as a professional voice of the Canadian glass community and, last but not least, established a sound financial base for the organization.

With my move to the west coast in 1996, it also became necessary to operate the GAAC board electronically, and I believe we have been successful at making this important transition.  Board communications now take place almost entirely via e-mail, the Gazette content is gathered via the internet, communicated to the editor and graphics person via the internet, and sent on to the printer electronically.  The significance of this is that future boards can be made up of members from anywhere in Canada (or outside of Canada!).

I was both pleased and grateful when Irene Frolic agreed to take on the job of president following the Red Deer conference.  She has brought new energy into the organization as well as her own style and important contacts throughout the international glass community.

Based on my own experience, I would urge others to step forward and get involved in the organization.  Our 20-year track record and many accomplishments serving the Canadian glass community shows that it can work and that GAAC does fulfill a useful purpose.

Irene Frolic, Current President

I am writing this at our summer place in Northern Ontario.  I am sitting at the shore, watching my grandson play in the water.  I am having a daydream.

I am in the lake standing on the broad shoulders of Ben Goodman, who so carefully and tenderly husbanded our organization for a record number of years.  Only his head and shoulders are visible above the water.  Although it has been more than a year since I became the president, I am still unsure of my footing.  Up there on Ben’s shoulders with me are the other seven board members.  We are poised.  It’s slippery.  It’s exciting, and perhaps a wee bit dangerous.  We’re ready to dive in.  The water will be cold.  Yikes … time to wake up!  Dr. Freud, where are you?

As a board we met last January to learn from the past and to look toward the future.  What we seem to be developing is a direction out into the world.  Not just looking out but actually going out.  We have spent many hours debating our direction and assessing our organization’s strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities.

What are our strengths?  We have in this country a deep, deep reservoir of artistic talent and technical knowledge.  We are generous with each other.  We have nurtured artists whose work, by its isolation, is original and fresh.

What are our weaknesses?  As a national group, we have not had the opportunity to make our mark.  Nationally, because of the realities of scale, we do not have a large network of galleries to show our work.  Internationally, we do not have a strong presence as a group (although our recent venture, sponsored by the Canadian Craft Council, the Ontario Craft Council, and the Canada Council at the GAS Conference in Amsterdam showed that there are many out there that are interested in news of Canadian artists).

What are our opportunities?  As a board, we’re looking at several options, or combinations of options:  a book; a curated travelling exhibition with a prize; a juried triennial emerging artist exhibition to correspond with our conferences, among others.

Of course, this takes dedication and hard work.  I have never had the pleasure of working with such a group of clear-thinking, enthusiastic professionals.  By the time the conference comes around next May 7-11, we will have set out direction and hope to make some announcements.  At that time, there will be a number of board vacancies that will need to be filled.  It will be an exciting time ahead.  If you or someone you know wants to be part of this hard-working group, please make a nomination.

 

 

DU FOND DES ARCHIVES

En observant les précédentes éditions de la Glass Gazette et du Contemporary Canadian Glass, il est évident que c’est un héritage écrit riche. Nous y avons parlé de nous-même en tant qu’artistes verriers canadiens, d’artistes verriers venant d’autre part, des techniques à l’emploi et des événements ayant cours. Nous avons tout couvert. C’est intéressant de creuser dans les archives et de ressortir quelques-uns des nombreux trésors pour vous les faire partager. Dans le cadre de notre 30e anniversaire, je suis retournée au temps de notre 20e anniversaire pour voir ce qui se tramait à l’automne 2002. Ce qui suit est un article écrit par les fondateurs et présidents du GAAC de l’époque. La personne qui a compilé ces témoignages n’est pas mentionnée mais je lui suis reconnaissante d’avoir fait ce travail (peut-être l’éditeur Ben Goodman ?). Comme c’est un peu long, je l’ai donc scindé en deux parties. Voici la première qui a été diffusée dans l’édition du Contemporary Canadian Glass à l’automne 2012. Ce qui suit est donc la deuxième partie,  très intéressante et clairvoyante. Bonne lecture!

Jamie Gray

Commentaires des Fondateurs et Anciens Présidents du GAAC

Deuxième  Partie (Shirley Elford, Laura Donefer, Sheila Mahut, Paulus Tjiang, Ben Goodman, Irene Frolic)

Shirley Elford

Difficile de croire que nous avons déjà 20 ans… mon dieu, comme le temps passe.

Au bout de 20 années, j’en suis à mon 4e atelier. Je suis passée de l’électricité au gaz, et maintenant à ce que j’appelle mon « atelier de retraitée ». Tout le nécessaire sauf l’équipement pour le travail à chaud. Je me revois, fraichement sortie de mes études,  rencontrer Max Leser chez lui à Toronto et tomber en admiration devant son atelier magnifique. Ce qui est génial, c’est que dans mon « atelier de retraitée », je possède maintenant son vieil équipement. La boucle est bouclée. C’est à cette époque que nous avons eu l’idée de constituer l’Association du Verre d’Art du Canada. Il nous a fallu franchir plusieurs étapes pour y parvenir. Pour pouvoir faire des demandes d’aide au financement, il fallait être déclaré en tant qu’organisation à but non lucratif. Beaucoup de notre temps a été consacré à comprendre ce que nous représentions et ce que nous voulions devenir.

La première chose à faire une fois nos statuts établis a été de prendre contact avec nos membres. Nous avions dans l’idée de publier quelque chose. Avec l’aide de Walter Sunahara du Conseil des Arts de l’Ontario, nous avons pu faire notre première demande de subvention, ce qui nous a permis de débuter. Nous étions l’Association du Verre d’Art du Canada. Notre parution se devait d’être bilingue. Nous nous sommes mis d’accord pour une publication trimestrielle et nous avons proposé aux membres résidents au Canada de nous confectionner des articles. D’Est en Ouest nos représentants nous tenaient informés de ce qui se passait de leur côté du pays. Notre principal problème était la traduction. Gilles Desaulniers nous a été d’une grande assistance en traduisant pour nous.

Les points forts de mon passage en tant que présidente ont été l’organisation des conférences sur le verre ainsi que les pique-niques de souffleurs de verre. Je chéri ces souvenirs et serait toujours fière de nos débuts. Nous étions si peu il y a 20 ans, et nous avons tellement grandi depuis !

Laura Donefer

Mon implication à l’Association du Verre d’Art du Canada remonte pratiquement à mes débuts dans l’art verrier, à peu près 20 ans, c’est un peu comme si nous avions grandi ensemble. Déjà en tant qu’étudiante au Sheridan College au début des années 80, j’ai participé aux débuts de l’association, mais je n’ai vraiment endossé mon rôle officiel de trésorière qu’en 1985 (en réalité principalement géré par un comptable en coulisses, mon bien aimé et patient partenaire Dave Hickie).

En 1988, lorsque je suis devenue présidente de l’association, Dave a vaillamment continué en tant que trésorier jusqu’à son départ de Toronto pour la campagne en 1990. Ma mission principale à la GAAC était de tisser des liens entre les groupes disparates d’artistes verriers dispersés dans tout le Canada pour tenter d’en faire un mouvement plus unifié. Sans trop savoir comment m’y prendre pour réaliser ce rêve, cette idée de ce rassemblement a vite tourné à l’obsession. Jusqu’à ce que Sue Rankin et Dave entrent dans ma vie vers le milieu des années 80. Avec ma colocataire Sue qui s’y connaissait en informatique et mes capacités littéraires, nous avons trouvé un équilibre pour prendre en charge l’édition de la Glass Gazette lancée par Shirley Elford et nous avons ainsi commencé à la publier trimestriellement. J’ai présidé la Gazette jusqu’en 1995 quand mon devoir de fille, d’enseignante, et ma carrière ont pris le dessus, mais il m’arrive encore de publier chaque années plusieurs articles. Pour moi, la Glass Gazette est la voix des artistes verriers canadiens et je suis très fière de son évolution. Lorsque j’ai débuté en tant que présidente, nos conférences étaient rares et éloignées, les personnes habitant à l’Est n’avaient aucune idée de ce qui se passait à l’Ouest et nous communiquions peu. Tout cela a vraiment changé depuis! J’ai été bouleversée en 2002 quand je me suis rendue compte que, non seulement mon rêve était en train de se réaliser, mais que le comité de la GAAC poursuivait le projet en tentant à présent de relier le Canada au reste du monde verrier. Nous sommes maintenant unis d’un bout à l’autre du pays comme jamais auparavant. Alors jouez votre rôle, écrivez quelque chose pour la Glass Gazette et gardez le sourire !

Sheila Mahut

Sheila n’était pas disponible pour contribuer à cet article.

Paulus Tjiang

La GAAC vivait ses heures sombres. Trésorier, j’étais à ce moment le seul membre du bureau,  personne n’ayant voulu appartenir au bureau les 4 années précédentes. On aurait dit que toute lettre, tout article et appel téléphonique tombaient dans une oreille sourde.

Je me suis alors fait la réflexion que si la GAAC devait en rester là, il fallait qu’elle se termine en beauté. J’ai organisé à la Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery de Waterloo une soirée bilan pour tous les membres, avec assemblée générale suivie d’une soirée conviviale.

Au programme de l’assemblée générale, un ultimatum. Si aucune nouvelle personne ne se porte volontaire pour faire partie du bureau, je dissoudrai l’association à la fin de cette soirée bilan. S’en suivi une courte discussion un peu houleuse et quelques mains finirent par se lever pour reprendre le flambeau de la GAAC. Ben Goodman fit un travail remarquable en prenant en charge la passation de la présidence à Irene Frolic et en dirigeant l’association pendant ce laps de temps.

En y repensant, l’expérience montre à quel point notre association de volontaires est tenace. C’est la volonté et la force de ces individus et de leur action qui en ont fait la réussite.

L’association durera tant  qu’elle aura une participation accrue de ses membres et conservera son esprit altruiste.

Ben Goodman

La durée de mon implication au bureau de la GAAC (de 1994 à 2001) a parfois chevauché certains événements importants de ma vie personnelle. Suite à l’obtention de mon diplôme de l’OCA au printemps 1990, je démarrais ma carrière d’artiste. J’en étais encore à mes débuts quand j’ai assisté à une assemblée générale de la GAAC au Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery à l’automne 1994. L’année précédente n’avais pas été très bonne pour la GAAC. Heureusement, Paulus Tjang accompagné de Karen McKinnell et Alfred Engerer, formaient un bureau de « dépannage » pour s’assurer que la GAAC ne capitulerait pas. Durant cette AG de 1994, Paulus venait d’annoncer la nouvelle aux membres présents. J’entends encore sa voix pleine d’espoir disant que ce serait la fin de la GAAC si personne ne se présentait pour former un nouveau bureau. Avec les encouragements de John Robinson juste derrière moi, j’ai levé une main hésitante et je me suis retrouvé dans ce nouveau bureau. Comme on le dit souvent (et c’est bien vrai), le bénévolat dans une association est un travail ingrat. Vous le faites parce que vous croyez en l’association et à ce qu’elle apporte à la communauté qu’elle sert. Durant mon temps au bureau, nous avons mené avec succès deux conférences nationales – Montréal en 1996 (avec le soutien d’une aide locale précieuse guidée par Maurice Gareau) et Red Deer en 2000 (organisée par Carol Jane Campbell), nous avons mis en place le site internet de la GAAC, réarrangé toutes les procédures administratives de la GAAC, promu la Glass Gazette en tant que porte-parole professionnel de la communauté du verre canadien et enfin et surtout, nous avons établi une base financière stable pour l’association.

Suite à mon déménagement sur la côte ouest en 1996, il devint nécessaire de parvenir à gérer la GAAC par courrier électronique et nous avons plutôt bien réussi cette transition.  Les communiqués du comité se font maintenant principalement par email, le contenu de la Gazette est regroupé via internet, communiqué aux éditeurs et aux graphistes par internet et envoyé électroniquement à l’imprimeur. Cela implique que les futurs comités pourront désormais être constitués de membres habitant tout le pays ou même résidents en dehors !.

J’ai été à la fois content et reconnaissant qu’Irene Frolic accepte de reprendre la présidence à la suite de la conférence de Red Deer. Elle a donné un nouveau souffle et son propre style à l’association et a apporté un nouveau réseau important au travers de la communauté verrière internationale.

Grâce à mon expérience personnelle, je ne peux que vous recommander de vous porter volontaire et de vous impliquer dans la vie de l’association. Nos 20 années d’expérience et les nombreux accomplissements pour la communauté du verre canadien prouvent que cela fonctionne et que la GAAC rempli bien son rôle.

Irene Frolic, Présidente Actuelle

Je vous écris de ma maison de vacances au nord de l’Ontario. Je suis assise sur le rivage et j’observe mon petit-fils jouant dans l’eau. Je fais un rêve éveillée.

Je suis dans le lac, debout sur les épaules de Ben Goodman, lui qui a si bien géré notre association avec délicatesse durant un nombre d’années record. Seules ses épaules et sa tête dépassent encore de l’eau. Cela fait maintenant plus d’un an que je suis devenue la présidente mais ma démarche est encore mal assurée. Les 7 autres membres du comité sont perchés avec moi sur les épaules de Ben. Nous sommes sereins. Ça glisse. C’est excitant et peut être un tantinet dangereux. Nous sommes prêts à plonger. L’eau va être froide. Brrr… c’est l’heure de se réveiller! Dr. Freud, êtes-vous là?

Nous nous sommes retrouvés en tant que bureau en janvier dernier pour tirer des leçons du passé et nous réjouir du futur. Il semblerait que nous sommes en train de développer une tendance vers l’international. Pas seulement en nous tournant vers le monde mais en y allant vraiment. Nous avons passé beaucoup de temps à débattre de nos orientations et à évaluer nos forces, faiblesses et opportunités de l’association.

Nos forces ? Nous possédons dans ce pays un puis de talent et de connaissances techniques très profond. Nous sommes généreux envers les autres. Nous avons encouragé des artistes qui par leur isolation, créent des œuvres originales et nouvelles.

Nos faiblesses? En tant que groupe national, nous n’avons pas encore eu l’occasion de laisser notre propre trace. Au niveau national, du fait de notre échelle, nous n’avons pas un large réseau de galeries pour exposer nos œuvres. Au niveau international, notre présence en tant que groupe n’est pas très forte (bien que notre dernier événement, sponsorisé par le Conseil des métiers d’art du Canada, Conseil des métiers d’art de l’Ontario et le Conseil des arts Canada  à la conférence GAS d’Amsterdam a démontré que plus d’un là-bas aimeraient avoir des nouvelles de nos artistes canadiens régulièrement).

Nos opportunités ? En tant que bureau, plusieurs possibilités s’offrent à nous avec une multitude de combinaisons: livre, exposition itinérante présidée par un curateur avec un prix à la clé, exposition triennale avec jury d’artistes émergeants en lien avec nos conférences et bien d’autres.

Bien sûr, tout cela nécessite un dévouement et un travail costaud. Je n’ai jamais autant de plaisir à travailler avec tel groupe de professionnels si enthousiastes et lucides. Quand la prochaine conférence du 7 au 11 mai approchera, certaines décisions auront été prises et nous espérons pouvoir y faire quelques annonces. A cet instant, quelques places au sein du bureau se seront libérées. Si vous-même ou quelqu’un de votre entourage avez envie de vous impliquer d’avantage dans ce groupe qui y met du sien, alors n’hésitez pas à nous en faire part.

Share

Comments by GAAC Founders and Past Presidents

October 15, 2012

FROM THE ARCHIVES

When I go back to look at past issues of the Glass Gazette and Contemporary Canadian Glass, a rich written heritage is evident.  We’ve talked about ourselves as Canadian glass artists, glass artists from elsewhere, every technique going, all events going.  We’ve covered it.  It’s great to get into the archives and dig out a few of the many treasures to share with you.  In light of our upcoming 30th anniversary, I’ve gone back to the time of our 20th anniversary to see what was what in the fall of 2002.  The following is an article written by the at-the-time founders and past presidents of GAAC.  The person who compiled all the statements is not mentioned, but I’m grateful that he/she did this (editor Ben Goodman, maybe?).  Because it’s lengthy, I’ve broken it into two parts, the second of which will be included in the Spring 2013 issue of Contemporary Canadian Glass.  What follows is the first part.  It’s an interesting and insightful read.  Enjoy!

Jamie Gray

 

Comments by GAAC Founders and Past Presidents

PART 1 (Gilles Desaulniers, Doris Fraser, Max Leser, Toan Klein)

October, 2002, Glass Gazette, page 33

The Glass Art Association of Canada has been fortunate to have had hardworking and dedicated presidents over the years.  To commemorate this 20th anniversary of the Association, we have put together a brief retrospective commentary from several of the founders and past presidents who give their views on the organization.

Gilles Desaulniers:  The Glass Art Association of Canada is Born

When Montreal hosted the Canadian Glass Conference in 1996, I had the opportunity to review some of the history of our association dedicated to glass artists and it goes like this:

In 1975, Bob Held called together the glass artists he knew to talk about glass.  We gathered at Sheridan College, and Bob expressed the desire to hold such meetings every year.  Then, in 1980, I was invited to the opening of the new glass studio at the Alberta College of Art.  Norman Faulkner was head of that studio and he promised that there would be demonstrations and discussions.

At lunch one day, we sat together – Bob Held, Norman Faulkner, Eddy Roman, Clark Guettel, and me.  I reminded Bob of his 1975 wish and offered to invite them to Trois-Rivieres and discuss the foundation of an association that would gather together glass artists and promote glass art.  They all agreed and there we were in spring 1981, in Trois-Rivieres, forming a committee charged with preparing the bylaws.  Toan Klein chaired this committee.  In 1982, at Harbourfront (Toronto) we voted on those bylaws prepared by Toan and his team.  The Glass Art Association of Canada was born.

The board of this Association comprised a representative from Eastern Canada (Quebec and Maritime Provinces), one for Western Canada (the Prairies and BC) and one for Central Canada (Ontario).

For many years, I represented Eastern Canada and wrote numerous articles for publication in the Glass Gazette.  I translated many of them so that there would be bilingual content in this publication.

The prime motivation for launching GAAC was to establish a means of helping each other as artists exploring this relatively new (to us)  medium and supporting our work and our discovery of glass.  We had the model of GAS in the United States and felt that this was a good idea.  When Bob Held invited his former students from Sheridan College to a GAAC meeting, he noticed that people were dispersed across Canada.  Once in the same room, it became apparent that we did not know each other.  Glass as an artistic medium was developing quickly, and many of us were experimenting and facing problems that others had learned to control.  Besides, we were all Canadians and it was only reasonable that we stick together and organize ourselves.

The enthusiasm of our first meetings soon faced the realities of communication – dealing with two languages, administrative costs, living so far away from each other, and so on.  The very fact that our organization is now 20 years old is proof that we have met these challenges.  We are more aware of who does what across Canada – through the Gazette (now in its 50th edition), through our website, through our electronic newsletter GlassWire, and through the increasingly bilingual nature of our communications.

 

Gilles Désaulniers : Naissance de l’Association des artistes verriers Canadiens* lors de la Biennale canadienne du verre à Montréal en 1996 où j’avais raconté mes souvenirs à propos de notre association d’artistes verriers. Me permettrez-vous de raconter cette naissance, puisque j’y étais ?

En 1975, Bob Held invite les verriers qu’il connaît pour échanger sur des sujets verriers. Nous nous retrouvons au Sheridan College et Bob souhaite que de telles réunions reviennent à chaque année. Ce n’est qu’en 1980 qu’une autre invitation me parvient pour l’inauguration des installations du nouvel atelier de verre au Alberta College of Arts. Norman Faulkner signe l’invitation et nous laisse entendre qu’il y aura des démonstrations et des discussions.

Pendant un dîner que nous partagions, Bob Held, Norman Faulkner, Eddy Roman, Clark Guettel et moi, je rappelle à Bob son souhait de 1975 et offre de les inviter à Trois-Rivières l’année suivante pour y discuter de la fondation d’une association qui prendrait en charge ces congrès et travaillerait à la promotion du verre canadien. Ils ont tous été d’accord et au printemps 1981, nous nous sommes retrouvés à Trois-Rivières pour discuter de l’opportunité d’une telle association. Nous avons alors mandaté un comité pour préparer les statuts. Toan Klein a présidé ce comité et en 1982, à Harbourfront (Toronto), nous votions les statuts préparés par Toan Klein et son équipe. L’Association des verriers canadiens était née. Le Conseil d’administration de cette nouvelle association comportait un représentant pour l’Est du Canada (Québec et provinces maritimes), un représentant pour l’Ouest du Canada (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta et Colombie-Britannique) et un représentant pour le Centre du Canada (Ontario). Pendant quelques années, j’ai agi comme représentant de l’Est du Canada, et à ce titre j’ai collaboré au journal Glass Gazette en traduisant certains articles car la publication était bilingue.

NB : En 1996, le nom utilisé était L’Association canadienne du verre d’art.

 

Doris Fraser

It is probably insane to admit to the amount of paper I have saved in files over the years, except when someone calls to find out what went on 20 years ago.  It must be some kind of foreknowledge of my inability to remember distinct details that has kept me from throwing out 25 years of diaries on calendars.

Peter  and I blew glass together in a shared studio (Sirius Glassworks) and as partners from 1976 to 1985.  The studio was in Brantford, then relocated to St. Williams, Ontario, and finally to Port Colborne (Gasline Hamlet).

The 1981 calendar has a lot of notes about the baby finally sleeping through the night, the amount of times newly batched glass had to be dumped on the floor because of bubbles, orders to be filled, show deadlines, and when the copper-tin red was successful or an abysmal failure.

I seem to remember that it was during the glass conference of March 1982 that a group of blowers decided it would be a good idea to form a Canadian glass association.  Max Leser was doing a lot of the initial arranging of meetings, and the first one seems to have been April 20, 1982 at Max’s studio in Toronto.

Subsequent meetings were held on May 19, June 11, August 17, September 9, and October 12, mostly in Toronto.  I held the position of treasurer on the founding board at that time.  I have recorded another meeting on February 15, 1983.  Somewhere in there we must have become chartered because our glass conference in May in Montreal was called the GAAC Conference.  Meetings were regular during 1983, and in that time Peter agreed to edit the first few editions of the Glass Gazette, and I was responsible for the graphics and layout.  I think we put out three issues, of which I have copies of two.  Toan Klein was the president of GAAC at that time.  My first notes about the Gazette are in September 1983.  The first issue is the one with my drawing of Pete’s hand holding the molten glass.

Peter and John Kepkiewicz and myself saw this issue through its birth, and then the impetus waned for a while for lack of input and finances.  The next issue is recorded as being shipped to Shirley Elford in February, 1985.  I presume it was the last of the three issues that we produced.  One of the issues has a drawing by our daughter Deirdre of her father blowing glass.  Another issue had an image of cracked glass on the cover.

Max Leser

Max now lives in Prague and is involved in industrial design.

Toan Klein

The creation of the Glass Art Association of Canada was rooted in a gathering we had in 1975 at the new glass department of Sheridan College School of Design in Port Credit, Ontario.  Bob Held had started the program and was able to take advantage of staff and equipment at the school to do mailings and host the gathering.  A scraggly group of about 15 young men and two women, Martha Henry and Doris Fraser, plus the late Montreal glass historian, Tom King, gathered together for two days discussing mutual challenges and shared experiences and slides.

Forgive me for not remembering all of the attendees, but among those present were Gilles Desaulniers, Ronald (Alfie) Lukian, and me from Quebec (I lived in Montreal at the time).  Marty Demaine drove from New Brunswick.  Ed Roman, Clark Guettel, Brian Ashby, Pete Gudrunas, and Doris Fraser (the first editors of the Gazette) were from Ontario.  As I recall, no one west of Ontario was present.  Most of the discussion centred on the technical aspects of getting hot.  There was no real system of supplying equipment for studio glassblowers at that time.  We doctored-up cullet or mixed our own batch, including colours.  Hand tools were imported from Europe or were homemade.  Dependable small glass furnaces couldn’t be ordered, no matter how big your credit card limit was.  The general feeling at that gathering was, “You are not alone!  Having glass run through your blood and brain does not make you an alien!”

My name is on the 1983 letters incorporating GAAC.  The example of what the Glass Art Society (GAS) was doing for U.S. glass had taught us that we needed to become incorporated as a non-profit organization.  This allowed us to go forward with grant applications and approach institutions for assistance with more legitimacy than the struggling craftspeople we actually were.  Our paid membership grew to about 125 and included collectors, historians, curators, and artists.  We had representatives from every southern region of the country.

As president of GAAC, in 1984, I chaired what I believe to be our first truly international conference on making and collecting three-dimensional glass.  It was centered at Harbourfront in Toronto.  In addition, a dozen city venues featured glass.  Shirley Elford, Cheryl Takacs, Lynn Ross, Ruby Ormiston, Heather Wood, John Kepkiewicz, Kathy Wood, Jean Johnson, Gilles, Pete, and Doris made major contributions to this event.  The world-renowned modern Czechoslovakian collection of the late Joseph Markovic was displayed to the public.  Bill Warmus of the Corning Museum of Glass lectured on Emile Galle.  Through Jane Mahut and the Koffler Gallery, Finnish designer Oiva Toikka attended, lectured, and demonstrated.  (The Canadian-Finnish connection continues today through exchanges with Sheridan College).  Bill Gudenrath, master of the Venetian-style goblets, worked the furnace.  Bob Held took time from his Skookum Art Glass studio in Calgary to participate, and Norm Faulkner also came from Alberta.  We also had our first members’ show, which was a lot of fun.

At that time – with the exception of Ed Roman, who was trained by his father Ed Sr. – we were looking outside Canada to learn skills and bring them back to practise.  Bob came from California and was influenced by U.S. makers, as was Alfie.  Marty studied with Sam Herman in England.  Gilles went to Czechoslovakia and France to study with Stanislav Libensky, Jaroslava Brychtova, and Claude Morin respectively.  I came from the States to work with Italians from Murano at Lorraine Glass in downtown Montreal.  Today, by contrast, made-in-Canada professional glassmakers are plentiful.  Glass studios are now found throughout Canada.

Besides coping with the lack of goods and services provided specifically for glassmakers, we also had a deep hunger for information and techniques.  Although Gilles had studied pate-de-verre in Czechoslovakia, and Peter Keogh was experimenting with it, virtually no warm glass was being made in Canada at that time.  Glass sculpture was a rarity, and a refined piece was even scarcer.  With few exceptions, like those of Lisette Lemieux in Quebec, cut-and-paste coldworked pieces were in a very experimental phase.  The schools, libraries, and specialty journals were building up their systems.  Ronald Labelle and Francois Houde were struggling to launch Espace Verre.  Not only crafts people were novices during the early years of studio glass in Canada.  Collectors, galleries, and craft shops were also relatively new to the field.  There was much less awareness back then of what was being made worldwide.  Today, the exchange of work and ideas between north and south is tremendous.  And through specialty magazines, the internet, and our own craft institutions we have become part of the globalization of art glass.

As a professional maker, it used to be that just creating a well-made object would assure its sale at a reasonable price.  Today, there are many more good-quality makers and better-designed and [hand]made imports from all over the world, some even ripped off from studio craftsmen, showing up in our shops and craft galleries.  It’s true that there are many more collectors and gift purchasers looking for handmade objects.  On the other hand, makers and objects also abound.  So, making a living by producing generic glass remains as difficult as ever.  But at least these days, distinct pieces that reflect the artist’s personal point of view or even classic forms exquisitely proportioned and executed, have more opportunity to find their audience.

One constant of GAAC that I have been impressed with all these years is the continued involved of Gilles Desaulniers of Trois-Rivieres, Quebec.  We first met in my days as a new immigrant to Montreal in the early 1970s.  He has not only been a great support as our Quebec representative but also persevered in all aspects of the organization.  He was tireless in translating every article of many issues of the Glass Gazette.  His enthusiasm helped to meld (or should I say “melt”?) the Francophone glass community and Les Anglais together, removing barriers during more difficult days and creating the truly bilingual, non-political Canadian organization and community we have today.  Thank you, Gilles!

As to the future of Canadian glass:  sadly, I think we are following the buck and looking to the United States for inspiration and financial support. Work is getting bigger but not better.  Production work is less distinct for the sake of better profit margins.  Quality pieces are too often funnelled off to the higher-paying U.S. market.  Instead of looking in museums and books to set a high standard of making based upon the long rich history of our craft, we are emulating the sensational, high-priced, media-friendly images that arrive with a click or in the mailbox month after month.  I guess it’s the way things are today in most traditional art forms.  Although there are some very fine Canadian craftspeople whose work I am inspired by, such as Irene Frolic and Andy Kuntz, I can’t help but feel that they are the exceptions.  I feel that, generally, what gets attention today will not withstand the test of time.  Of course, this is just my personal perception and reality to deal with.  The line between visual art and theatre is getting thinner.  The line between theatre and photo op is also fading.  Time will tell.

 

DU FOND DES ARCHIVES

En observant les précédentes éditions de la Glass Gazette et du Contemporary Canadian Glass, il est évident que c’est un héritage écrit riche. Nous y avons parlé de nous-même en tant qu’artistes verriers canadiens, d’artistes verriers venant d’autre part, des techniques à l’emploi, des événements ayant cours. Nous avons tout couvert. C’est intéressant de creuser dans les archives et d’en ressortir quelques-uns des nombreux trésors pour vous les faire partager. Dans le cadre de notre 30e anniversaire, je suis retournée au temps de notre 20e anniversaire pour voir ce qui se tramait à l’automne 2002. Ce qui suit est un article écrit par les fondateurs et présidents du GAAC de l’époque. La personne qui a compilé ces témoignages n’est pas mentionnée mais je lui suis reconnaissante d’avoir fait ce travail (peut-être l’éditeur Ben Goodman ?). Comme c’est un peu long, je l’ai scindé en deux parties, la deuxième sera diffusée dans l’édition du Contemporary Canadian Glass au printemps 2013. Voici donc la première partie qui est très intéressante et clairvoyante. Bonne lecture !

Jamie Gray

 

Commentaires de Fondateurs et Anciens Présidents du GAAC

Première Partie (Gilles Desaulniers, Doris Fraser, Max Leser, Toan Klein)

Octobre 2OO2, Glass Gazette, page 33

L’Association des artistes verriers Canadiens a eu la chance d’avoir au fil des années des présidents dévoués et appliqués. Pour célébrer les 20 ans de l’association, nous avons rassemblé rétrospectivement les avis de plusieurs fondateurs et précédents présidents qui nous donnent leurs impressions sur l’organisation.

Gilles Désaulniers: L’Association canadienne du Verre d’Ar est née

Naissance de l’Association des artistes verriers Canadiens* lors de la Biennale canadienne du verre à Montréal en 1996 où j’avais raconté mes souvenirs à propos de notre association d’artistes verriers. Me permettrez-vous de raconter cette naissance, puisque j’y étais ?

En 1975, Bob Held invite les verriers qu’il connaît pour échanger sur des sujets verriers. Nous nous retrouvons au Sheridan College et Bob souhaite que de telles réunions reviennent à chaque année. Ce n’est qu’en 1980 qu’une autre invitation me parvient pour l’inauguration des installations du nouvel atelier de verre au Alberta College of Arts. Norman Faulkner signe l’invitation et nous laisse entendre qu’il y aura des démonstrations et des discussions.

Pendant un dîner que nous partagions, Bob Held, Norman Faulkner, Eddy Roman, Clark Guettel et moi, je rappelle à Bob son souhait de 1975 et offre de les inviter à Trois-Rivières l’année suivante pour y discuter de la fondation d’une association qui prendrait en charge ces congrès et travaillerait à la promotion du verre canadien. Ils ont tous été d’accord et au printemps 1981, nous nous sommes retrouvés à Trois-Rivières pour discuter de l’opportunité d’une telle association. Nous avons alors mandaté un comité pour préparer les statuts. Toan Klein a présidé ce comité et en 1982, à Harbourfront (Toronto), nous votions les statuts préparés par Toan Klein et son équipe. L’Association des verriers canadiens était née. Le Conseil d’administration de cette nouvelle association comportait un représentant pour l’Est du Canada (Québec et provinces maritimes), un représentant pour l’Ouest du Canada (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta et Colombie-Britannique) et un représentant pour le Centre du Canada (Ontario). Pendant quelques années, j’ai agi comme représentant de l’Est du Canada, et à ce titre j’ai collaboré au journal Glass Gazette en traduisant certains articles car la publication était bilingue.

Notre motivation première pour la création du GAAC était d’établir un moyen d’entraide aux artistes explorant ce matériau relativement nouveau (à nos yeux) et d’encourager notre travail et notre découverte du verre. Nous avions pris pour modèle le GAS aux Etats-Unis et pensions que c’était une bonne idée. Lorsque Bob Held invita ses anciens élèves de Sheridan College à un meeting GAAC, il se rendit compte nous étions tous dispersés à travers le Canada. Une fois tous dans la même pièce, il devint évident que personne ne se connaissait. Le verre en tant que moyen artistique était en train de se développer rapidement et beaucoup d’entre nous faisions face aux que d’autres avaient déjà appris à maitriser. De plus, nous étions tous canadiens et cela semblait normal de se serrer les coudes et de nous organiser.

La réalité des difficultés de communication eu bientôt raison notre l’enthousiasme du premier meeting – gérer en deux langues, les coûts administratifs, les grandes distances entre chacun, etc. Le fait même que notre association fête aujourd’hui ses 20 ans est la preuve concrète que nous avons su faire face à ces challenges. Nous sommes bien plus au courant de qui fait quoi au Canada – grâce à la Gazette (qui en est à son 50e numéro), au site internet, à notre newsletter GlassWire et à une approche de plus en plus bilingue de nos communications.

* En 1996, le nom utilisé était L’Association canadienne du verre d’art.

Doris Fraser

Je passerai probablement pour une folle si j’avouais la quantité de paperasse que j’ai pu conserver dans des classeurs au fil des ans, sauf évidemment si on vous appelle pour vous demander ce qui s’est passé il y a 20 ans. Ça doit être mon pressentiment à ne pas pouvoir me souvenir de détails précis qui m’a gardé de jeter ces 25 années d’agendas et de plannings.

Peter et moi même soufflions le verre ensemble dans un atelier partagé (Sirius Glassworks) ainsi qu’en tant que partenaires de 1976 à 1985. L’atelier était à Branthford, puis a été déplacé à St. Williams en Ontario et au final à Port Colborne (Gasline Hamlet).

Mon agenda de 1981 contient beaucoup de commentaires sur le bébé qui arrive enfin à faire ses première nuit, le nombre de fois que la fournée de verre a été balancée à cause des bulles, les commandes à passer, les délais pour les expos, et quand le rouge cuivré était réussi ou totalement raté.

Je crois me rappeler que c’était pendant la conférence de Mars 1982 qu’un groupe de souffleurs s’est dit qu’il serait bon de former une association du verre canadienne. Max Leser a beaucoup fait pour l’organisation des premiers rendez-vous et le premier eu lieu dans son atelier le 20 avril 1982 à Toronto.

D’autres meetings suite au premier ont été tenus le 19 mai, le 17 aout, le 9 septembre et le 12 octobre, pour la plupart à Toronto. A cette époque, je tenais le poste de trésorière au bureau fondateur. J’ai noté une autre réunion le 15 février 1983. Quelque part vers cette date-là, nous avons dû être agréé car notre conférence sur le verre en mai à Montréal s’intitulait la GAAC Conference. Les réunions étaient fréquentes durant l’année 1983. A cette époque, Peter accepta d’éditer les premiers numéros de la Glass Gazette et je fus en charge des graphiques et de la mise en page. Il me semble que nous en avons édité trois dont il me reste encore deux numéros. Toan Klein était le président du GAAC à ce moment. Mes premières notes concernant la Gazette datent de septembre 1983. Le premier numéro paru est celui avec mon esquisse de la main de Pete en train de porter du verre en fusion.

Peter et John Kepkiewicz et moi-même avons donc assisté à la naissance de cette édition puis notre élan s’est un quelque peu ralenti dû au manque de finances et d’apports. L’édition suivante est marquée comme ayant été postée à Shirley Elford en février 1985. Je suppose que c’était le dernier des trois numéros que nous avons produit. L’un des numéros a un dessin de notre fille Deirdre de son père en train de souffler le verre. L’autre a une image de verre craquelé sur la couverture.

Max Leser

Max vit maintenant à Prague et s’est investi dans le design industriel.

Toan Klein

La création de l’Association des Artistes Verriers Canadiens est issue d’un rassemblement que nous avons eu en 1975 au nouveau département verrier du Sheridan College School of Design à Port Credit en Ontario. Bob Held étant à l’initiative de ce cursus, il a pu profiter du personnel et du matériel de l’école pour faire des invitations et accueillir l’événement. Un petit groupe désordonné de 15 jeunes hommes et deux femmes, Martha Henri et Doris Fraser, ainsi que de feu Tom King, historien verrier de Montréal, se sont rassemblés pendant deux jours pour parler des challenges mutuels et partager leurs expériences et leurs clichés.

Pardonnez-moi si je ne me souviens pas exactement du nom de tous les participants, mais parmi eux étaient présents Gilles Desaulniers, Ronald (Alfie) Lukian, et moi-même du Québec (à cette époque, j’habitais à Montréal).  Marty Demaine était venue en voiture du New Brunswick.  Ed Roman, Clark Guettel, Brian Ashby, Pete Gudrunas, et Doris Fraser (premiers éditeurs de la Gazette) venaient de l’Ontario.  Si je me souviens bien, il n’y avait personne de plus à l’Ouest que l’Ontario. La plupart des conversations portaient sur les aspects techniques du travail à chaud. Il n’y avait pas vraiment de fournisseurs d’équipement pour les souffleurs de verre dans les ateliers à cette époque. Nous improvisions notre propre calcin et mélangions nous-même nos batch, même en ce qui concernait les couleurs. Les outils étaient importés d’Europe ou fait-maison. Il était impossible de commander un four de fusion même avec la plus grosse des cartes bancaires. Le sentiment général à ce rassemblement était « Non vous n’êtes pas seuls ! Ce n’est pas parce que du verre coule dans votre sang et votre cerveau que vous êtes différents ! »

Mon nom figure sur les papiers de 1983 mentionnant le GAAC. En suivant le modèle de la Glass Art Society (GAS) aux US, nous avons compris qu’il fallait nous constituer en tant qu’organisation à but non lucratif. Cela nous permit de demander des bourses et de contacter plus légitimement des instituts pour faire appel à leur soutien. Le nombre d’adhérents payants est passé à 125 et comprenait des collectionneurs, des historiens, des conservateurs et des artistes. Nous avions des représentants de chaque région du sud du pays.

En tant que président du GAAC, en 1984 je présidais ce qui, d’après moi, est notre première vraie conférence internationale sur la fabrication et la collection du verre tridimensionnel. Elle fut tenue au Harbourfront de Toronto. De plus, une douzaine de lieux dans la ville présentaient du verre. Shirley Elford, Cheryl Takacs, Lynn Ross, Ruby Ormiston, Heather Wood, John Kepkiewicz, Kathy Wood, Jean Johnson, Gilles, Pete, et Doris contribuèrent beaucoup à cet évènement. Bill Warmus du Corning Museum of Glass réalisa une conférence sur Emile Galle. Par le biais de Jane Mahut et de la galerie Koffler, la designeuse finlandaise Oiva Toikka assista, tint une conférence et fit même une démonstration. (Les liaisons canado-finlandaises se poursuivent toujours au travers d’échanges avec le Sheridan College). Bill Gudenrath, maitre des gobelets vénitiens, travaillait le four de fusion. Bob Held pris congé de son atelier Skookum Art Glass à Calgary pour venir et Norm Faulkner se déplaça aussi d’Alberta. La première exposition inter-membres eu lieu et ce fut très sympa.

A cette époque – à l’exception d’Ed Roman qui avait appris grâce à son père Ed Sr.- nous nous tournions tous vers l’extérieur du Canada pour apprendre et ramener ces compétences pour les mettre en pratique. Bob venait de Californie et était influencé par des créateurs américains, tout comme Alfie. Marty étudia avec Sam Herman en Angleterre. Gilles parti en Tchéquoslovaquie et en France pour étudier respectivement avec Stanislav Libensky, Jaroslava Brychtova puis Claude Morin. J’arrivais des Etats-Unis pour travailler avec des Italiens de Murano au Lorraine Glass dans le downtown de Montréal. Aujourd’hui, à l’inverse, les verriers professionnels made-in-Canada abondent. On trouve à présent des ateliers verriers à travers tout le Canada.

En plus d’avoir à gérer le manque de produits et de services spécifiques aux verriers, nous ressentions un besoin d’obtenir plus d’informations et de techniques. Bien que Gilles avait étudié la pâte de verre en Tchéquoslovaquie et que Peter Keogh faisait aussi des essais, le verre à chaud n’était quasiment pas travaillé au Canada à cette époque. La sculpture du verre était rarissime et les œuvres raffinées encore plus rare. A quelques exceptions près comme celle de Lisette Lemieux au Québec, le travail à froid coupé-collé en était encore à ses débuts expérimentaux. Les écoles, bibliothèques et surtout les journaux spécialisés étaient en train de se monter peu à peu. Ronald Labelle et François Houde se démenaient pour lancer l’Espace Verre. Il n’y avait pas que les artistes qui étaient novices durant les débuts du verre en atelier au Canada. Les collectionneurs, les galeries et les boutiques artisanales étaient aussi relativement nouveaux dans le domaine. Il y avait bien moins de communication à ce sujet à l’époque. Aujourd’hui, l’échange de travaux et d’idées entre le nord et le sud est énorme. Et au travers des magazines spécialisés, d’internet et de nos organisations d’art, nous avons participé à la globalisation de l’art du verre.

En tant que fabricant professionnel, je peux témoigner qu’avant, la conception d’un bel objet bien fait, assurait sa vente à un prix décent. De nos jours, les créateurs de bonne qualité avec un meilleur design sont plus nombreux, ainsi que les importations d’objets du monde entier, certains même escroqués à de petits artisans qui resurgissent dans nos boutiques et galeries. Il est vrai que les collectionneurs et acheteurs de cadeaux recherchant des objets artisanaux sont plus nombreux. D’un autre côté, les fabricants et les objets abondent aussi. De ce fait, parvenir à vivre rien qu’en produisant du verre générique est toujours aussi difficile. Cependant, les œuvres spécifiques qui reflètent vraiment le point de vue personnel de l’artiste ou même des formes plus classiques parfaitement proportionnées et exécutées ont de nos jours plus d’occasions de trouver leur juste public.

L’implication continue de Gilles Desaulniers de Trois-Rivières au Québec durant toutes ces années au GAAC m’impressionne toujours autant. Nous nous sommes rencontrés pour la première fois alors que j’arrivais fraichement à Montréal au début des années 1970. Il n’a pas seulement été d’un grand soutien en tant que représentant pour le Québec mais a aussi insisté sur tous les aspects de l’organisation. Il insistait pour traduire chaque article des nombreux numéros de la Glass Gazette. Son enthousiasme a joué dans l’intégration de la communauté du verre francophone à celle des anglais, en repoussant les barrières durant les périodes difficiles et aidant à la création de l’organisation et de la communauté canadienne véritablement bilingue et apolitique que nous connaissons aujourd’hui. Merci Gilles !

Quant au futur du verre canadien, je crois malheureusement que nous suivons les dollars et nous tournons vers les Etats-Unis pour trouver l’inspiration et un soutien financier. Le travail grandit mais ne s’améliore pas forcément. La production de masse est affinée dans le but de réaliser de plus grosses marges de profit. Les œuvres de qualité sont trop souvent dispatchées vers les US où le marché est plus rentable. Au lieu de regarder dans les livres et dans les musées pour élaborer un standard élevé basé sur la longue et riche histoire de notre art, nous recherchons le sensationnel, les prix élevés, des images qui plaisent aux médias et qui peuvent tomber en un clic de souris dans une boite aux lettres mois après mois. Bien qu’il y ait des artistes canadiens très doués comme Irene Frolic ou Andy Kuntz dont le travail m’a inspiré, je ne peux m’empêcher de croire que ce sont des exceptions. J’ai le pressentiment que ce qui retient généralement notre attention à l’heure actuelle ne traversera pas l’épreuve du temps. Bien sûr, ce n’est que mon opinion personnelle, et il faudra voir la réalité. La frontière entre le visuel et le théâtre diminue. La frontière entre théâtre et la photo op s’atténue aussi. Le temps nous dira.

Share

Rapport de bourse

February 15, 2012

Par: Myrianne D. Giguère

INTRODUCTION

J’ai eu l’honneur de recevoir le 2010 GAAC Project Grant for Students, après avoir gradué en 2010 d’Espace VERRE (Montréal, Québec). Les techniques que j’ai privilégiées en troisième année de formation sont la sérigraphie sur verre et la pâte de verre. À l’automne 2010, j’ai débuté un baccalauréat en Beaux-arts  à l’Université Concordia, avec une majeure en Studio art. Grâces, entre autres, aux bourses GAAC Project Grant for Students et Houdé-Mendel, j’ai eu la possibilité de continuer à travailler parallèlement le verre.

Le projet soumis est composé de deux parties. D’abord, j’ai pris un cours privé de sérigraphie aux ateliers GRAFF[1], un centre de conception graphique axé sur la recherche et la création. Puis, j’ai acheté le matériel nécessaire à l’application des nouvelles connaissances acquises chez GRAFF, pour expérimenter.

DÉMARCHE

Suite à la réception de la bourse, j’ai d’abord pris contact avec GRAFF pour prendre un cours privé d’une durée de 10 heures avec un excellent professeur, l’imprimeur Claude Fortaich. Il m’a d’abord montré comment travailler l’image initiale sur Photoshop. C’est une étape importante dans le procédé : choisir la trame, séparer les couleurs, ajuster les tons, etc. Puis, il m’a expliqué tout le procédé de l’émulsion photosensible et nous avons répété chacune des étapes pour fixer l’image sur la soie. Ensuite, nous avons fait de très nombreuses impressions au médium à l’eau, sur papier, pour pratiquer les techniques d’impression. Une fois plus à l’aise, j’ai fais des impressions à l’huile sur différentes surfaces (cuivre, aluminium, bois, verre, liège, plexiglass). J’ai ainsi pu constater comment chaque support se travaille différemment. Finalement, Claude Fortaich m’a parlé du Conseil québécois de l’estampe et des normes entourant la pratique de l’impression et m’a montré une Fiche de justification de l’estampe originale.

Pour appliquer les principes de la sérigraphie sur le verre, j’avais besoin de différents outils : un cadre à sérigraphie, une raclette, du papier transfert, de l’émail, du médium à sérigraphie, du cover coat, différentes spatules, etc.  On m’a offert le cadre et la raclette, alors il ne me restait plus qu’à acheter le reste. Tout ce qui a trait à l’émail a été commandé chez Reusche[2], via leur site web. En quincaillerie, je me suis procuré le reste. Finalement, j’ai acheté du verre Spectrum en feuille. J’ai fixé les images sur la soie à l’Université Concordia, sans frais. Pour ce qui est des cuissons, je n’ai pas eu de frais à payer puisqu’avec la bourse Houdé-Mendel, j’avais accès gratuitement à un four de thermoformage pendant 6 mois, pour de la recherche et de la création.

J’ai choisi d’expérimenter la sérigraphie sur verre à l’aide du papier transfert. Il s’agit d’un papier sur lequel on sérigraphie avec de l’émail à base d’huile. Une fois sèche, on recouvre l’image d’un cover coat qui la rend imperméable. Dans l’eau, l’image adhère au cover coat et se détache du papier. On la fixe sur le verre et on la cuit, de façon à ce que l’émail fusionne et que la couche protectrice brûle.

J’ai beaucoup appris lors de ces expérimentations. J’ai fais toutes les erreurs possibles : trop de médium et pas assez d’émail, la térébenthine qui coule et corrompt l’image adjacente lors d’une impression, une impression pas sèche en mettant le cover coat (ce qui l’arrache), etc. Donc beaucoup de plaisir et l’apprentissage d’une technique complexe, puisqu’elle nécessite une gestuelle parfaite lors de l’impression et un calcul précis lors des autres étapes.

CONCLUSION

Suite à l’utilisation de la bourse 2010 GAAC Project Grant for Student, je peux affirmer avoir acquis de l’expérience dans la sérigraphie sur verre. Je comprends bien le procédé et j’ai beaucoup d’idées pour l’intégrer dans ma pratique artistique. Reste maintenant à pratiquer ma gestuelle d’impression (un peu comme un souffleur de verre qui doit répéter un geste avant d’arriver à le faire correctement). De plus, cette opportunité m’a permis de mieux connaître le centre GRAFF, de même que les artistes en impression qui y travaillent.

[Je remercie chaleureusement le GAAC de m’avoir permis de vivre cette expérience.]

Dessins avec lesquels j’ai joué



[1] Situé au 963, rue Rachel Est, Montréal, Québec, H2J 2J4 (514) 526-9851

[2] http://www.reuscheco.com

 

Grant Report

GAAC Project Grant for Student

By:  Myrianne D. Giguère

INTRODUCTION

I was lucky to receive the 2010 GAAC Project Grant for Students, after graduating from Espace VERRE (Montreal, Quebec) in 2010. During my 3rd year studies, I focussed on silkscreen printing techniques on glass and kiln casting. In the fall 2010, I integrated Concordia University to study for an Arts Baccalaureat with a major in Studio Art. Thanks to GAAC Project Grant for Students and Houdé-Mendel Grant among others, I was able to carry on my work with glass in parallel.

This project report is set in two parts. First of all, I attended a private course on silkscreen printing within GRAFF studios, a graphic design centre focused on research and creation. Then I purchased some equipment in order to practice what I had learned from GRAFF and experiment it.

APPROACH

When receiving the grant, I first contacted GRAFF in order to benefit from a 10 hours private lecture with Claude Fortaich, a great printer and teacher. He first showed me how to work on an initial picture with Photoshop. This was an important step for the process: how to choose backgrounds, split colours, adjust shades, etc. He then taught me the whole process of light-sensitive emulsion and we practiced each step to set a picture on silk. Next, we made numerous water prints on paper with medium to practice printing techniques. Once I felt a little more confident, I started printing with oil on various surfaces (copper, aluminium, wood, glass, cork, Plexiglas). This made me realise that each component required a different work approach. Finally, Claude Fortaich introduced me to the Quebec Council of Art Print, he told me about printing regulations and showed me documentary evidence from original art print.

In order to carry out silkscreen printing techniques on glass, some tools are essential: a silkscreen print frame, a scraper, transfer paper, enamel, silkscreen printing medium, cover coat, various spatulas, etc. I was already given the frame and the scraper so I all I needed to buy was the rest. I ordered on Reusche’s website everything that had to do with enamel. I then purchased the rest in a hardware store. And finally, I bought some Spectrum layered glass. Concordia University let me fix the images on silk for free. I didn’t pay anything either to use a kiln. Thanks to my Houdé-Mendel grant, I was also able to benefit from 6 months free access to kiln forming for research and creation purposes.

I decided to try silkscreen printing on glass with transfer paper. This paper enables silkscreen prints with oil based enamel. Once dry, the image is covered with a cover coat making it waterproof. Dipped into water, the picture sticks to the cover coat and peels of the paper. When fixed to the glass and heated, the enamel fuses and the protection layer burns.

I learned a lot from these experimentations. I made all possible mistakes: too much medium, not enough enamel, dripping turpentine that spoils the adjacent picture during printing, applying the cover coat too early on fresh print (ripping it off), etc. I had a lot of fun learning such a complex technique that requires exact movements for the printing and accuracy during the other stages.

CONCLUSION

Having benefited from a 2010 GAAC Project Grant for Student, I can now tell how much experience I have gained in silkscreen printing on glass. I clearly understand now the process and have many ideas for ways to integrate it into my art work. I still need to practice my printing moves (like glass blowers need to practice their movements before being successful). Moreover, I got to know the GRAFF centre better and meet with the print artists working there.

[I would like to thank GAAC for enabling me to live such an experience.]

Share
//