Formative Glass Exhibit at the Leighton Art Centre September 27- October 26, 2014

March 2, 2015

by Stephanie Doll

 

Front of the Invitation

Front of the Invitation

 

It is a rare opportunity that the Leighton Art Centre’s (LAC) Heritage Home Art Gallery gets to host a full glass exhibition. The LAC, known for its two-dimensional landscape exhibits, opened its doors to Formative, a group glass exhibition organized by Katherine Lys and Julia Reimer, featuring local talent from Black Diamond’s popular Firebrand Glass Studio. Formative featured the work of six glass artists including Elisabeth Cartwright, Jamie Gray, Melanie Long, Julia Reimer, Tyler Rock and Katherine Russell. This diverse group came together to demonstrate the boundless borders of glass art in Alberta.

 

Long, Melanie

Long, Melanie

 

Gray, Jamie. Bison

Gray, Jamie. Bison

 

Formative featured a wall of blown and moulded deer busts by artist Melanie Long, which were flanked by Tyler Rock’s “The Almighty Voice” installation of four blown glass domes and found objects. Jamie Gray’s mirrored bison skull acted as the focal point of the exhibit. Hanging on the historical LAC easel in the center of the gallery, the skull shared the light with Julia Reimer’s blown glass bird’s nest and sculptural wall pieces. On the east wall of the gallery, the matte quality of Katherine Russell’s fused and sand carved panels was juxtaposed with Elisabeth Cartwright’s bird’s nest and branches, covered in a thin cocoon of glistening, webbed glass.

 

Russell, Katherine. Along These Lines

Russell, Katherine. Along These Lines

 

Cartwright, Elisabeth

Cartwright, Elisabeth

 

Formative presented emerging glass artists alongside established practitioners. The works of Firebrand’s mature artists reflect conceptual expressions while emerging artists focus on the manipulation of glass media and exploring the possibilities of molten glass. Artists Tyler Rock and Jamie Gray presented two standout conceptual pieces, both of which narrate stories of Alberta’s post-colonial realities, a topic that is rarely breached in the landscape-focused LAC.

 

Reimer, Julia. Flotsam

Reimer, Julia. Flotsam

 

Organizer Julia Reimer’s choice to merge new and established artists demonstrates the key role Firebrand Glass Studio plays in nurturing a vibrant community of glass artists in Alberta. Not only does Firebrand provide studio space for artists, it also acts as a hub, providing the community and support necessary in developing a successful glass art career. Formative is the fruit of the Firebrand Glass Studio’s labour, and it indicates that the glass community in Southern Alberta is thriving. Not only does Southern Alberta have a strong group of emerging glass artists, but they are also supported by an equally strong group of mentors, including glass veterans Tyler Rock and Julia Reimer at the Firebrand Glass Studios in Black Diamond.

 

 

 

Exposition verre de Formative au Leighton Art Centre Du 27 septembre au 26 octobre 2014

par Stephanie Doll

 

Front of the Invitation

Front of the Invitation

 

C’est une véritable opportunité de pouvoir admirer à la Heritage Home Art Gallery du  Leighton Art Centre (LAC) une exposition entièrement consacrée au verre. Habituellement connu pour ses expositions de paysages en 2D, le LAC a ouvert ses portes à Formative, une exposition groupée organisée par by Katherine Lys et Julia Reimer sur le verre et présentant les œuvres des talents locaux du fameux atelier Firebrand Glass Studio de Black Diamond. Formative rassemble les six artistes : Elisabeth Cartwright, Jamie Gray, Melanie Long, Julia Reimer, Tyler Rock et Katherine Russell. Ce groupe éclectique s’est rassemblé pour démontrer les possibilités à l’infini de l’art du verre en Alberta.

 

Long, Melanie

Long, Melanie

 

Gray, Jamie. Bison

Gray, Jamie. Bison

 

Formative nous présente un mur de bustes de chevreuils moulés et soufflés par l’artiste Mélanie Long, accompagné de l’installation de Tyler Rock “ The Almighty Voice” de quatre dômes en verre soufflé protégeant des objets trouvés. Le crâne de bison miroitant de Jamie Gray est l’incontournable point central de l’exposition. Il est accroché à l’antique présentoir du LAC au cœur de la galerie. Le crâne partage le feu des projecteurs avec les nids d’oiseaux en verre soufflé et les pièces sculpturales de Julia Reimer. Sur la façade Est, l’aspect matte des panneaux de verre fusés et sablés de Katherine Russel est juxtaposé aux branches et nids d’oiseaux d’Elisabeth Cartwright, autour desquels  s’entremêle un verre fin et scintillant.

 

Russell, Katherine. Along These Lines

Russell, Katherine. Along These Lines

 

Cartwright, Elisabeth

Cartwright, Elisabeth

 

Aux côtés de ceux déjà largement reconnus, Formative nous a présenté des artistes émergents. Le travail des artistes plus anciens de Firebrand reflète des expressions plus conceptuelles tandis que les artistes qui débutent se concentrent surtout sur la pratique du verre en elle-même, et l’exploration des possibilités du verre en fusion. Tyler Rock et Jamie Gray nous ont présenté deux œuvres conceptuelles remarquables, traitant toutes deux de la situation postcoloniale de l’Alberta, un sujet rarement abordé dans les différents paysages habituellement exposés au LAC.

 

Reimer, Julia. Flotsam

Reimer, Julia. Flotsam

 

Le choix de la part de l’organisatrice de mêler des artistes à la réputation établie à des artistes plus jeunes d’expérience nous montre le rôle essentiel du Firebrand Glass Studio dans l’entretien d’une communauté vibrante d’artistes verriers en Alberta. Non seulement le Firebrand fournit un espace de travail pour les artistes, il est aussi une plaque tournante qui alimente la communauté et apporte le soutien nécessaire pour développer une carrière brillante dans le verre. Formative est le fruit du travail du Firebrand Glass Studio et nous démontre que la communauté du verre en Alberta est en pleine ébullition.  Non seulement le Sud de l’Alberta  héberge un grand nombre d’artistes émergents en verre, mais ils sont soutenus par un nombre équivalent de mentors et de vétérans du verre comme Tyler Rock et Julia Reimer au Firebrand Glass Studio de Black Diamond.

Share

SiO2 : Armel Desrues and Marc-André Fontaine Leave Their Mark on Glass

June 15, 2014

by Valérie Paquin

 

 

From June 5 to September 5, 2014, Espace VERRE’s gallery presents SiO2,an exhibition showcasing the cumulative works of Armel Desrues and Marc-André Fontaine. The pair forms the 2014 graduating class of the Fine Craft – Glass Option program, offered in collaboration with the Cégep du Vieux Montréal.

After several years of traditional glassblowing apprenticeship in France, Armel Desrues came to Quebec with the desire to delve deeper into the realm of concept and design. During his time at Espace VERRE, he has learned to benefit from the North American approach, where glass is used in more sculptural and experimental ways. Fascinated by the actual process of transforming our favourite material, he explores the plasticity of molten glass to create forms that retain traces of their mutations.

Armel’s hybrid sculptures coexist between reality and fiction, while rebuffing classical references. His anthropomorphic work is the result of research on the correlation between our environment and the history of glass. Further, we get a sense that his creations have an evident penchant for contemporary design, as demonstrated by the organic forms of his production. Pendant lights and perfume bottles were both created by letting the subsequent hot glass gathers dictate the shape of the object.

 

 

Desrues, Armel. Artefact no1 (detail) (2014), blown, hot-sculpted and sandblasted glass, neon (Michel Dubreuil)

Desrues, Armel. Artefact no1 (detail) (2014), blown, hot-sculpted and sandblasted glass, neon (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Desrues, Armel. Perfume bottles, blown glass (Michel Dubreuil)

Desrues, Armel. Perfume bottles, blown glass (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

In parallel, Marc-André Fontaine has the utmost respect for the craftsmanship of artisans throughout history. His pieces explore the link between the passing of time and the rituals that mark our existence. He has a wide range of inspirations, including the vestiges of the Vikings, the work of glass artist Bertil Vallien, and the satiric humor of graffiti artist Banksy. While forming new links between tradition and contemporary art, Marc-André delivers a playful testimony of his own life while paying homage to the sea and its navigators, and making references to the popular culture of his generation.

 

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Buoys, blown glass, braided rope (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Buoys, blown glass, braided rope (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Marc-André’s works unite the strength of a delicate subject with comical musing. While connected to the collective memory, the pieces reconfigure his own personal rites of passage. The young artist’s tongue-in-cheek reference to the human condition of our era generates smirks all around.

 

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (detail) (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (detail) (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

What does the future hold for these two promising artists? Only time will tell. Armel is hoping to join Espace VERRE’s transitional workshop, Fusion, next fall. However, he is also considering applying as studio assistant for North Lands Creative Glass in Scotland, or pursuing a Masters at the University of Sunderland’s National Glass Centre. Marc-André means to continue working as technician for Espace VERRE while starting up his own neon shop in Montreal with a fellow graduate, and establishing his career as an emerging glass artist.

SiO2 will be shown at the Espace VERRE Gallery through September 5, 2014. The glass art centre, located at 1200 Mill Street in Montreal, Quebec, is open from Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm, as well as the last Sunday of every month from noon to 5 pm. Admission is free of charge.

 

 

Left: Marc-André Fontaine, right: Armel Desrues (Espace VERRE + Marilyn Faucher)

Left: Marc-André Fontaine, right: Armel Desrues (Espace VERRE + Marilyn Faucher)

 

 

 

SiO2 | ARMEL DESRUES + MARC-ANDRÉ FONTAINE LAISSENT LEURS MARQUES SUR LE VERRE

par Valérie Paquin

 

 

Du 5 juin au 5 septembre, la galerie Espace VERRE présente le travail des deux finissants de la promotion 2014, Armel Desrues et Marc-André Fontaine. L’exposition SiO2 est le point culminant de leur formation collégiale en métiers d’art – option verre, offerte en collaboration avec le cégep du Vieux Montréal.

Issu d’un apprentissage du verre soufflé traditionnel en France, Armel Desrues  arrive au Québec avec une soif d’approfondir les stades de la conception et du design. Durant ses années d’exploration à Espace VERRE, il apprend à tirer bénéfice de l’approche nord-américaine, avec laquelle le verre est perçu d’une manière beaucoup plus sculpturale et expérimentale. Fasciné par le processus même de transformation de la matière, il exploite la plasticité du verre en fusion pour générer des formes en conservant les traces de sa mutation.

 

Les sculptures hybrides d’Armel, à mi-chemin entre le réel et la fiction, se détournent des modèles classiques. Ses œuvres anthropomorphiques sont le résultat d’une étude ayant pour but d’établir une relation entre notre environnement et l’histoire du verre.

 

 

Desrues, Armel. Artefact no1 (detail) (2014), blown, hot-sculpted and sandblasted glass, neon (Michel Dubreuil)

Desrues, Armel. Artefact no1 (detail) (2014), blown, hot-sculpted and sandblasted glass, neon (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

D’autant plus, on sent dans ses créations un penchant évident pour le design actuel, traduit par les formes organiques de sa production. Ses luminaires et flacons de parfum sont nés d’une volonté de laisser la succession de cueillettes de verre définir les lignes de l’objet.

 

 

Desrues, Armel. Perfume bottles, blown glass (Michel Dubreuil)

Desrues, Armel. Perfume bottles, blown glass (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

Parallèlement, Marc-André Fontaine témoigne d’un grand respect pour les artisans à travers les âges. Son travail explore la relation entre le temps qui passe et les rituels qui marquent notre existence. Avec des inspirations aussi diversifiées que les vestiges vikings, l’artiste verrier Bertil Vallien et l’humour satirique du graffiteur Banksy, il crée de nouveaux liens entre la tradition et l’art actuel. Avec SiO2, Marc-André nous livre un testament ludique de son vécu, avec autant d’hommages à la mer et aux navigateurs, qu’aux références pop de sa génération.

 

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Buoys, blown glass, braided rope (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Buoys, blown glass, braided rope (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

Les œuvres de Marc-André allient la force d’un propos sensible à une idée amusante, rattachée à la mémoire collective.

 

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

 

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (detail) (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

Fontaine, Marc-André. Noise (detail) (2012-2014), sandcast glass, leather, felted wool (Michel Dubreuil)

 

 

Ses pièces, qui se veulent une reconfiguration de ses propres rites de passage, laisseront leur public avec un indice sur la condition humaine à notre époque, ainsi qu’un petit sourire en coin.

Que réserve l’avenir pour ces deux artistes prometteurs? Seul le temps nous le dira. Armel espère se joindre à Fusion, l’atelier de transition d’Espace VERRE, à l’automne prochain. Toutefois, il considère aussi postuler pour un poste d’assistant d’atelier pour le North Lands Creative Glass en Écosse, ou encore s’inscrire à la maîtrise au National Glass Centre de l’université de Sunderland. Quant à Marc-André, il compte continuer à travailler comme technicien à Espace VERRE, tout en démarrant son propre atelier de néon à Montréal ainsi que sa carrière professionnelle de verrier de la relève.

SiO2 se poursuit à la galerie Espace VERRE jusqu’au 5 septembre 2014. Le centre de formation, de création et de diffusion des arts verriers est situé au 1200, rue Mill à Montréal. La galerie est ouverte du lundi au vendredi de 9 h à 17 h, ainsi que le dernier dimanche de chaque mois de 12 h à 17 h. L’entrée est gratuite.

 

 

Left: Marc-André Fontaine, right: Armel Desrues (Espace VERRE + Marilyn Faucher)

Left: Marc-André Fontaine, right: Armel Desrues (Espace VERRE + Marilyn Faucher)

 

 

Share

Review: Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape – Susan Rankin and Manola Borrajo-Giner

Strathcona Country Gallery@501, Sherwood Park AB, March 14 – April 27, 2014

 

by Sydney Lancaster

All photos by Sydney Lancaster

 

 

 

“ … objects, narratives, memories, and space are woven into a complex, expanding web — each fragment of which gives meaning to all the others.”1

 

 

Installation View, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Featuring wall-mounted work by Manola Borrajo-Giner, vessels by Susan Rankin.

Installation View, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Featuring wall-mounted work by Manola Borrajo-Giner, vessels by Susan Rankin.

 

 

Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape offers a wide-ranging exhibition of glass artistry. The diversity and energy of this collection could, at first glance, seem a bit overwhelming. But there’s real insight in the curation here: as part of a whole, each piece holds its own but contributes to a sequence of brilliant, thoughtful gestures that weave through the entire exhibition. As viewers, we are invited to participate in a sequence of dialogues: between different methods of working with glass, between historical and contemporary references to line and form, and, between two artists who express their love of colour and the natural world and who show their understanding of the materiality of their work in different but complimentary ways.

 

 

nstallation View, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Featuring wall-mounted work by Manola Borrajo-Giner, vessels by Susan Rankin.

nstallation View, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Featuring wall-mounted work by Manola Borrajo-Giner, vessels by Susan Rankin.

 

 

There is an exuberance in Borrajo-Giner’s work.  Her large slumped-glass panels offer just enough containment and structure for her loose, painterly gestures. These are glass canvases upon which the energy of expressive mark-making commands centre stage, taking their cues from the heritage of abstract expressionist painting. Dots work both as gestural marks that at once draw the eye to specific points and create overall texture within compositions.

 

 

Installation View, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Featuring wall-mounted work by Manola Borrajo-Giner, vessels by Susan Rankin.

Installation View, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Featuring wall-mounted work by Manola Borrajo-Giner, vessels by Susan Rankin.

 

 

In other panels, this motif is expanded to loosely line-drawn ovoid and circular forms that dominate the visual field. These figures point toward notions of inclusiveness, of drawing in and drawing together: a demarcation of spaces that have the potential to hold entire universes.

 

 

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Nucleus (2014). Kiln formed glass, enamels, and pigment.

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Nucleus (2014). Kiln formed glass, enamels, and pigment.

 

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Arabesque (2014). Glass panel, enamels, and pigment.

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Arabesque (2014). Glass panel, enamels, and pigment.

 

 

Other works reveal the connections between Borrajo-Giner’s glass works and her painting practice. These panels retain some of her characteristic abstracted mark-making and use of vibrant colour, but nod more directly to the traditions in landscape painting and historical glass painting processes.

 

 

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Birch Forest (2013). Kiln formed glass, enamels, and pigment.

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Birch Forest (2013). Kiln formed glass, enamels, and pigment.

 

 

Rankin’s vessels reveal her mastery of blowing and working glass. Her vessels have beautiful proportions, and reveal her command of form and tremendous ability to discipline a sometimes temperamental material. Many of the vessels in this exhibition reveal her interest in historical forms – Roman urns, classical Greek and Roman architecture, 18th and 19th Century flower paintings, Tiffany stained glass among them.2

 

 

Susan Rankin. Five Scroll Vases. Blown and solid worked glass, sandblasted surface.

Susan Rankin. Five Scroll Vases. Blown and solid worked glass, sandblasted surface.

 

 

But Rankin’s blown and worked glass is much more than simply a modern take on past methods and imagery. There’s a deep understanding of the power of these elegant shapes, a juxtaposition of the simple sensuality of a vessel’s form against voluptuous floral embellishments.

 

 

Susan Rankin. Sargasso Green over Chartreuse With White Flowers (2007), Red Purple with Yellow/Gold Daisies (2014), Dark Green over Aurora with Pink Calla Lillies, Curry with Yellow/Orange Clematis (2014). Blown and solid worked glass, sandblasted surface.

Susan Rankin. Sargasso Green over Chartreuse With White Flowers (2007), Red Purple with Yellow/Gold Daisies (2014), Dark Green over Aurora with Pink Calla Lillies, Curry with Yellow/Orange Clematis (2014). Blown and solid worked glass, sandblasted surface.

 

 

This same understanding extends to Rankin’s sculptural works shown here.  Her garden columns and wired forms reveal her keen observation and interest in flowers, gardens, and other natural elements, but, in these instances, Rankin has stripped down and simplified each piece to explore the beauty of the underlying structures and the evocative quality of line and shadow. Regardless of approach, her work reveals a deep regard for beauty in its many iterations, coupled with a keen eye and attention to craftsmanship and detail.

 

 

Susan Rankin. Green Seed Closed Hollow Form, Soft Blue Seed Emerging, Blue Seed Emerging, (2014). Steel and wire, hand blown glass.

Susan Rankin. Green Seed Closed Hollow Form, Soft Blue Seed Emerging, Blue Seed Emerging, (2014). Steel and wire, hand blown glass.

 

 

Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape invites us to contemplate the relationship between culture and nature, and the ways in which artists such as Borrajo-Giner and Rankin combine inspiration from the natural world and cues from historical approaches to their chosen materials and subject matter. Perhaps, more tellingly, this exhibition affords the opportunity to consider the falsely-drawn boundary between fine art and fine craft in new ways. In this lush collection of work, the viewer is given ample indication that the best art embodies attention to detail, command of materials, and abiding skill and craftsmanship – that art can be beautiful and thoroughly intelligent and thought-provoking at the same time.

 

1William J. Mitchell. “Melbourne Train.” in Evocative Objects, Ed. Sherry Turkle. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2007. p. 150.

 

2 For a fascinating discussion of both the historical and political resonances of Rankin’s work, see the essay by Cinzia Corellia in Susan Rankin: Valid Objects of Beauty, exhibition catalogue. Heather Smith, editor/curator. Moose Jaw: Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery, 2009. 

 

Dear Members,

It is great sadness that I inform you that Manola Borrajo-Giner passed away peacefully on June 11, 2014.

 

A Mass will be held at Our Lady of Guadalupe Spanish Catholic Church (11314 – 111 Avenue) in Edmonton on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. A Celebration of Manola’s wonderful Life will follow at Grandview Heights Community Centre (12603 – 63 Avenue, Edmonton) from 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, kindly consider making a donation to 1000 Women: A Million Possibilities in support of Norquest College students; a charity dear to her heart. Her family wishes to thank the staff at the Cross-Cancer Institute for their kindness and care.

See more at:

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/edmontonjournal/obituary.aspx?pid=171353122#sthash.rpvB04K3.dpuf

 

 

 

Critique de l’exposition: Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape – Susan Rankin et Manola Borrajo-Giner

Strathcona Country Gallery@501, Sherwood Park AB, Mars 14 – Avril 27, 2014

 

par Sydney Lancaster

Toutes les photographies sont de Sydney Lancaster

 

 

 

“Objets, histoires, souvenirs et espaces s’entremêlent dans un tissage complexe et chaque fragment donnant un sens à tous les autres”1

 

 

nstallation, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Présentant des pièces murales de Manola Borrajo-Giner et des récipents de Susan Rankin.

nstallation, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Présentant des pièces murales de Manola Borrajo-Giner et des récipents de Susan Rankin.

 

 

L’exposition` Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape “nous propose une grande variété d’art verrier. La diversité et l’énergie de cette collection pourraient à première vue sembler quelque peu déstabilisantes. Pourtant on y trouve une réelle démarche de la part des organisateurs , faisant partie intégrante d’un tout, chaque pièce possède son propre attrait mais contribue à mettre en lumière une succession d’étapes réfléchies et astucieuses qui se déploient tout au long de l’exposition. En tant que visiteurs, nous sommes amenés à plonger dans une série d’interrogations, entre les différentes méthodes de travail du verre, entre les références historiques et contemporaines aux lignes et aux formes et entre deux artistes qui nous expriment chacun leur amour de la couleur et de la nature, en nous montrant leur interprétation matérielle de façons différentes et pourtant complémentaires.

 

 

Installation, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Présentant des pièces murales de Manola Borrajo-Giner et des récipents de Susan Rankin.

Installation, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Présentant des pièces murales de Manola Borrajo-Giner et des récipents de Susan Rankin.

 

 

Le travail de Borrajo-Giner montre une forme d’exubérance. Ses vastes panneaux de verre nous donnent tout juste assez de structure pour contenir ses gestes amples à la façon des peintres. Ces fresques de verre dans lesquelles les traits expressifs centralisent l’énergie, s’inspirent de la peinture expressionniste abstraite. Les points forment à la fois une marque attirant l’œil sur un endroit spécifique et une texture dans son ensemble au sein de la composition.

 

 

nstallation, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Présentant des pièces murales de Manola Borrajo-Giner et des récipents de Susan Rankin.

nstallation, Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape. Présentant des pièces murales de Manola Borrajo-Giner et des récipents de Susan Rankin.

 

 

Dans d’autres panneaux, ce motif est développé pour former de vagues lignes arrondies dominant le champ visuel. Ces figures soulignent la notion de globalité, de contenir un dessin dans le dessin, de délimiter des espaces qui ont le potentiel de contenir des univers entiers.

 

 

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Nucleus (2014). Verre moulé, émaux, et pigments.

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Nucleus (2014). Verre moulé, émaux, et pigments.

 

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Arabesque (2014). Panneaux de verre, émaux, et pigments.

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Arabesque (2014). Panneaux de verre, émaux, et pigments.

 

 

D’autres œuvres révèlent le lien évident entre le travail du verre de Borrajo-Giner et ses talents de peintre. Ces panneaux contiennent la touche abstraite caractéristique de ses peintures ainsi que des couleurs vives, mais penchent plus vers les techniques de représentation traditionnelle de paysages et l’utilisation de procédés historiques de peinture sur verre.

 

 

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Forêt de Bouleaux (2013). Verre moulé, émaux, et pigments.

Manola Borrajo-Giner. Forêt de Bouleaux (2013). Verre moulé, émaux, et pigments.

 

 

Les récipients de Rankin révèlent son savoir-faire du soufflage et du travail du verre. Ses récipients ont des proportions harmonieuses, montrent sa maitrise des formes et une incroyable capacité à discipliner un matériau parfois caractériel. Nombre des récipients dans cette exposition nous montrent son attrait pour les formes historiques –parmi eux, amphores romaines, architecture classique grecque et romaine, peintures florales du 18e et 19e siècle et verre teinté Tiffany.2

 

 

Susan Rankin. Cinq Vases Scroll. Verre soufflé et verre plein, sablage en surface.

Susan Rankin. Cinq Vases Scroll. Verre soufflé et verre plein, sablage en surface.

 

 

Mais le travail soufflé de Rankin est bien plus qu’une simple modernisation de méthodes et de styles anciens. Il y a une profonde compréhension de la puissance de ces formes élégantes, de la juxtaposition de la sensualité humble d’un récipient avec ses embellissements floraux voluptueux.

 

 

Susan Rankin. Sargasso Green over Chartreuse With White Flowers (2007), Red Purple with Yellow/Gold Daisies (2014), Dark Green over Aurora with Pink Calla Lillies, Curry with Yellow/Orange Clematis (2014). Verre soufflé et verre plein, sablage en surface.

Susan Rankin. Sargasso Green over Chartreuse With White Flowers (2007), Red Purple with Yellow/Gold Daisies (2014), Dark Green over Aurora with Pink Calla Lillies, Curry with Yellow/Orange Clematis (2014). Verre soufflé et verre plein, sablage en surface.

 

 

Cette même démarche se dégage des sculptures de Rankin. Ses colonnes de jardin et ses formes en fer forgé nous présentent son intérêt et son observation pointue des fleurs, des jardins et autres éléments naturels, tout en conservant la simplicité de chaque pièce pour explorer l’éclat sous-jacent des structures et la beauté évoquée par les lignes et les ombres. Au-delà de la démarche, son travail présente un regard approfondi sur la beauté et ses nombreuses interprétations, associé à un œil assidu et un souci du détail et de l’esthétique.

 

 

Susan Rankin. Green Seed Closed Hollow Form, Soft Blue Seed Emerging, Blue Seed Emerging, (2014). Acier et fil de fer, verre souffé.

Susan Rankin. Green Seed Closed Hollow Form, Soft Blue Seed Emerging, Blue Seed Emerging, (2014). Acier et fil de fer, verre souffé.

 

 

Duality in a Diaphanous Landscape nous invite à contempler le lien entre culture et nature, la façon dont des artistes tels que Borrajo-Giner et Rankin combinent ce que la nature leur inspire avec les courants du passé en utilisant le matériau et le thème de leur choix. Il se pourrait même que cette exposition mette en évidence d’une nouvelle façon, les fausses limites imposées entre l’art et l’artisanat. Dans cette riche collection d’œuvres, le visiteur comprend que le meilleur art est celui qui englobe le sens du détail, la maitrise du matériau et le talent pour la création artisanale. On prend conscience  que l’art peut être beau tout en étant intelligent, réfléchi et contestataire.

 

1William J. Mitchell. “Melbourne Train.” dans Evocative Objects, Ed. Sherry Turkle. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2007. p. 150.

 

2 Pour une discussion fascinante sur l’impact à la fois historique et politique du travail de Rankin, lisez l’article écrit par Cinzia Corellia dans le catalogue de l’exposition : Susan Rankin: Valid Objects of Beauty. Heather Smith, éditrice/conservatrice. Moose Jaw: Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery, 2009. 

 

Cher Membres,

C’est avec tristesse que nous voulons vous informer que Manola Borrajo-Giner est décéder paisiblement le 11juin, 2014. ll y aura une messe à “Our Lady of Guadelupe Spanish Catholic Church” (11374-Il,LAvenue) à Edmonton, le mercredi 18 juin,2014 à 4h. Une celebration de la merveilleuse vie de Manola se suivra à Grandview Heights Community Centre (12603 – 63 Avenue, Edmonton) de 6 h à 8h30 (le soir). En lieu de fleur, vous pouvez faire un don a “1000 Women: A Million Possibilities”, en supportent les étudiants de Norquest College: une charité
pres de son coeur. Sa famille veut remercier les personnels de l’institut Cross Cancer pour leur bonté et soins.

Pour plus d’ information:

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/edmontonjournal/obituary.aspx?pid=171353122#sthash.rpvB04K3.dpuf

 

 

Share

Book Review: Reflections, The Art of Alison Kinnaird

by Jamie Gray

 

 

Reflections, The Art of Alison Kinnaird (Book cover design by John Slavin)

Reflections, The Art of Alison Kinnaird
(Book cover design by John Slavin)

 

 

Let me just say up front that it was a tiny bit intimidating being given the opportunity to review a publication outlining the works of an artist the likes of Alison Kinnaird.  I’m not even going to call her a “glass artist” or a “craftsperson,” though she absolutely is both of those.  This extraordinary lady is an artist first and foremost.  Ms. Kinnaird has an international reputation for excellence in glass, being top of her field in copper wheel engraving.  She works in all ranges of size; from small intimate pieces to work on a grand architectural scale.  Her new book, Reflections, The Art of Alison Kinnaird, takes the reader on a retrospective four-decade trip from Ms. Kinnaird’s earliest artistic experiences to the international reputation she enjoys today.

 

 

Kinnaird, Alison. Passing Through (2006) Photo by Robin Morton

Kinnaird, Alison. Passing Through (2006)
Photo by Robin Morton

 

 

When I had a quick initial flip through this beautiful softcover book, the first thing that struck me was the great number and high quality of images of Ms. Kinnaird’s work.  Those of us who have had a go at photographing glass know its many difficulties.  Ms. Kinnaird’s work is multi-dimensional, using natural and LED light, optical fibre lighting, photography, digital printing on textile, programmed moving sequences, lenses, etc, all of which, in conjunction with glass’ natural photographic difficulties, would provide mighty challenges for the photographer.  The photos in this book are so skillfully done that they are portrait-like, which is appropriate since many of her engraved works are portraits in themselves.

 

The book begins with an introduction by James Holloway, Director at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery from 1997 to 2012, who relays the positive experience of overseeing Ms. Kinnaird’s commission to do a Donor Window commemorating the re-opening of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in 2011.

 

Following the introduction is a short essay by Ms. Kinnaird in which she talks about the character and nature of glass, the act of “breaking the surface” to produce beauty and meaning, tradition vs the contemporary, myth and legend, the incorporation of music and light in glass, stories as metaphors, and symbolism.  Ms. Kinnaird agrees with artists from time immemorial:  “I often feel that the images are trapped within the glass, and that it is my job to free them.”  This she does with a sensitive hand, taking into account factors such as space restrictions, client character, and architectural/historical challenges.

 

Human form is an inspiration and is often Ms. Kinnaird’s subject.  Her work is thoughtful, transformative, often subtle; carefully rendered in glass, a most challenging and interesting material.  Light and shadow are masterfully incorporated into her pieces, creating incredible multi-dimension.  Engraved glass is quite often seen in monochromatic shades of “white” on transparent, and much of Ms. Kinnaird’s work is traditionally rendered that way, but some of her key pieces have an influx of brilliant colour added by the use of LED lights.  Consider the thoughtful inclusion of reds in a recent installation called Unknown.  Ms. Kinnaird says, “This installation was completed over a three-year period, and is made up of 52 figures.  Glass seemed the ideal medium in which to comment on the fragility of human life in war.  The soldiers are arranged in ranks, and each is uniquely engraved – though they appear uniform, each is an individual.  There are references to the Terracotta Army of the Chinese emperors, as well as fairground shooting galleries.  Also included are a number of civilian figures – “collateral damage” affects us all.”

 

 

Kinnaird, Alison. Unknown (2010-2013) Photo by Robin Morton

Kinnaird, Alison. Unknown (2010-2013)
Photo by Robin Morton

 

 

And, just to top everything, while I’ve been reading and reviewing her book, I’ve been enjoying Ms. Kinnaird’s latest CD, Alison Kinnaird, The Silver String.  Yes, she’s also an internationally celebrated musician and instructor who plays several types of harp.  I recommend the purchase of this CD, which contains Scottish melodies both traditional and contemporary, as well as a DVD with three short films by Robin Morton which show the relationship between glass art and music.  The CD/DVD package is a separate purchase, but the DVD with the three films is a complimentary gift found in the back cover of Reflections, The Art of Alison Kinnaird.  With all this talent and giving back to the world of her experience and knowledge, it’s not a surprise that Queen Elizabeth awarded Ms. Kinnaird an MBE for services to Art and Music in 1997.  My recommendation:  get this book, enjoy it and be enriched.

 

 

Kinnaird, Alison. The Silver String CD + DVD (Cover design and photography by Simon Hollington)

Kinnaird, Alison. The Silver String CD + DVD
(Cover design and photography by Simon Hollington)

 

 

Many thanks to Alison Kinnaird and Robin Morton for providing this book, hot off the presses, for review; I highly recommend it.

 

 

Alison Kinnaird, MBE, is a glass artist and musician, living and working in Temple, Scotland.  She is the recipient of many prestigious awards and her work is in the collections of museums, galleries, private homes, public buildings, and the Scottish parliament.  She has exhibited internationally, been much written about, and has produced six albums of harp music.  You can learn more about her at www.alisonkinnaird.co.uk and www.templerecords.co.uk.

 

Share

Along These Lines: An Exhibition Review

February 18, 2014

By Julia Reimer

 

Katherine Russell is one of the most determined people I know. When she came and worked for us many years ago, she told me that her family nearly disowned her for going to art school and studying glass. I think this struggle strengthened her resolve and this resolve has served her well.

 

As you all know, having a career in glass is not an easy thing and we all need plenty of resolve, stubbornness and support. When I spoke with Katherine this past fall she would often ask how anyone could have a practice and a young child. Not having had this experience, I had no idea; but I often think that having a practice is hard enough and that it takes lots of time and money to put together a solo show.

 

I also saw Katherine come and rent our studio a few times and really use the production skills she has honed over the past few years to make her work. But she had to travel a few hours to get here and, with her son, her time in the shop was limited.

 

Arts Station Gallery view (2014), fused, coldworked & blown glass, various sizes (Terry Lys)

Arts Station Gallery view (2014), fused, coldworked & blown glass, various sizes (Terry Lys)

 

So having said all this, I don’t know why I was surprised when I went to her recent exhibition, “Along These Lines”, at the Fernie Arts Station.  It was a snowy, blowy night and I thought that because of the weather and the fact that Katherine doesn’t live in Fernie, there would only be a few people there and probably just a few pieces exhibited. Well the place was packed; full of friends and family from far way. Also, the walls and plinths were full of a diverse range of work.

 

Katherine lives in Elkford, B.C., which is a small mining town with a glass community of one. When she and her husband moved there, instead of packing in her glass career she set up a coldworking and kilnforming studio even though her practice to that point was based in the hotshop. The work on the walls of the gallery were evidence of that exploration of process and technique. There was a very diverse range of pieces:  wall panels, sculptural plinth work, and functional objects. There seemed to be a theme running through most of the work – strong graphic imagery representing landscape. This work was inspired by detailed photos of the Australian ground that was one of the ways she felted rooted in a place far from home when she lived and worked there a few years ago.

 

"Along These Lines" (2014), fused & coldworked glass, 35 x 35". (Terry Lys)

“Along These Lines” (2014), fused & coldworked glass, 35 x 35″. (Terry Lys)

 

Of the exhibited pieces, I felt really drawn to the some of the wall pieces which, although formed in a flat process, had a lot of texture and shape derived from deep coldworked cuts and thick layers of colour. What was nice about this was the pieces seemed less static – not just a flat image but more sculptural and less like a picture. I also really liked how the colour in the patterns created a texture and seemed to pull the shape and impact it. These intersections of colour and the pattern and texture they create were part of what Katherine was trying to achieve and I think this worked out well for the wall panels.

 

The blown work had some really strong graphic qualities as well, with some interesting intersections of graphic lines and colour. Looking at the wall work, I found myself wanting to see some of those same deep coldworked cuts in the blown work; to have the blown pieces be pulled about by the colour and to have the forms reflect this graphic imagery. The blown forms seemed a bit staid compared to the wall pieces. I think blown work can often fall into more defined shapes and ideas but ideally the design of it should have a strong connection and share elements with one of kind work.

 

"Void (detail)" (2013), fused & coldworked glass, 32 x 32". (Katherine Russell)

“Void (detail)” (2013), fused & coldworked glass, 32 x 32″. (Katherine Russell)

 

It was interesting talking with Katherine after the show about the development of this work, which in some ways is such a departure from her previous blown work. Although the connections to pattern are still there, the kilns have allowed her to change the scale and direction of the work. I got a real sense of Katherine’s excitement about working in kilns, about the possibilities of this technique, and the freedom of trying something unknown. Katherine, like many artists is doing something amazing; finding freedom and experimentation of what they don’t have instead of what they do.

 

 

Julia Reimer grew up and still lives in a small prairie town nestled in the foothills of southern Alberta. She completed her course work at ACAD in 2000 and now owns and operates Firebrand Glass Studio with her husband, Tyler Rock. Her aesthetic, based on the simplicity of light and form, is derived from the environment of crisp prairie light, gentle hills and windswept grasslands.

 

 

Critique de l’Exposition « Along These Lines »

Par Julia Reimer

 

Katherine Russell est l’une des personnes les plus déterminées que je connaisse. Lorsqu’elle est venue travailler avec nous il y a plusieurs années de ça, elle m’avait expliqué comment sa famille l’avait pratiquement déshéritée pour avoir voulu étudier le verre dans une école d’art. Cette difficulté a surement renforcé sa volonté et cela lui a rendu service.

 

Comme vous le savez tous, faire carrière dans le verre n’est pas chose facile et nous avons tous eu besoin de beaucoup de volonté, d’obstination et de soutien. En discutant avec Katherine à l’automne dernier, nous nous interrogions souvent sur comment parvenir à travailler tout en s’occupant d’un enfant en bas-âge. N’ayant pas été dans cette situation, je n’en savais rien, mais être verrier me parait déjà bien assez difficile et pouvoir présenter sa propre exposition demande beaucoup de temps et d’argent.

 

Katherine a aussi loué notre atelier plusieurs fois et je l’ai vu utiliser les compétences qu’elle avait acquises au cours des années précédentes pour y produire son travail. Mais elle devait faire plusieurs heures de route avec son fils pour s’y rendre, ce qui limitait son temps dans l’atelier.

 

Arts Station Gallery view (2014), fused, coldworked & blown glass, various sizes (Terry Lys)

Arts Station Gallery view (2014), fused, coldworked & blown glass, various sizes (Terry Lys)

 

Tout ceci étant dit, je me demande à présent comment j’ai pu être surprise lorsque je me suis rendue à sa dernière exposition « Along These Lines » au Fernie Arts Station. Le temps était neigeux et venteux et comme Katherine n’habitait pas Fernie, je m’attendais à voir quelques pièces et peu de monde. Eh bien la salle était comble, pleine d’amis et de membre de la famille venus de loin. De plus, les murs et les supports étaient remplis de toute une variété d’œuvres.

 

Katherine habite Elkford B.C., une petite ville minière où la communauté verrière se réduit à une seule personne. En s’installant dans cette ville avec son mari, et bien qu’elle n’ait qu’une expérience de travail à chaud,  Katherine s’est constitué un atelier de thermoformage et de travail à froid au lieu de ranger sa carrière au garage. Les pièces exposées aux murs montraient cette exploration des procédés et des techniques. Il y en avait une grande variété : panneaux muraux, sculptures sur socle et divers objets fonctionnels. À travers son travail, on pouvait discerner le thème récurrent du paysage par une imagerie graphique forte. Inspiré de photos détaillées du sol Australien, elle présente par ses œuvres son attachement pour cet endroit lointain où elle a habité et travaillé il y a plusieurs années.

 

"Along These Lines" (2014), fused & coldworked glass, 35 x 35". (Terry Lys)

“Along These Lines” (2014), fused & coldworked glass, 35 x 35″. (Terry Lys)

 

De toutes les pièces exposées, certaines pièces murales ont particulièrement attiré mon attention. Bien que réalisées à plat, elles présentaient beaucoup de texture et de formes provenant d’aspérités profondes réalisées à froid et de couches épaisses de couleurs. Les pièces n’avaient pas l’air statiques – elles avaient plus l’air de sculptures que d’images figées. J’ai aussi vraiment apprécié la façon dont la couleur produisait un relief et semblait souligner et influencer les formes. Le relief et la texture obtenus par ces jeux de couleur faisaient partie des intentions de Katherine et ses panneaux le retranscrivait très bien.

 

Son travail soufflé possédait également des qualités graphiques pertinentes et des jeux de courbes et de couleurs intéressants. En observant le travail mural, j’ai réalisé que je souhaitais retrouver ces mêmes aspérités à froid dans le travail de soufflage ; pour que les formes des pièces soufflées soient elles-aussi influencées par la couleur et reflètent cette même imagerie graphique. Les formes soufflées me semblaient un peu sages par rapport aux pièces murales. D’après moi, le verre soufflé prend souvent des formes et des idées plus définies, mais son design devrait toujours transmettre une impression forte et posséder des éléments retranscrivant la singularité du travail accompli.

 

"Void (detail)" (2013), fused & coldworked glass, 32 x 32". (Katherine Russell)

“Void (detail)” (2013), fused & coldworked glass, 32 x 32″. (Katherine Russell)

 

Après l’exposition, j’ai pu discuter avec Katherine et c’était très intéressant de comprendre la progression de son projet, qui par bien des aspects, était très différent de son précédent travail de soufflage. Bien qu’on retrouve les mêmes motifs, les fours lui ont apporté une nouvelle dimension pour varier l’orientation de son travail. J’ai ressenti un réel enthousiasme de la part de Katherine pour son projet avec les fours, les multiples possibilités de cette technique amenant la liberté d’essayer des choses inconnues. Comme beaucoup d’autres artistes, Katherine réalise quelque chose de fascinant : elle a trouvé la liberté d’expérimenter ce qu’elle ne connaît pas au lieu de faire ce qu’elle sait déjà.

 

Julia Reimer a grandi et vit encore dans une petite ville au pied des collines du sud de l’Alberta. Elle a obtenu son diplôme à l’ACAD en 2000 et possède maintenant avec son mari Tyler Rock, l’atelier Firebrand Glass Studio. Basé sur la simplicité de la lumière et des formes, son esthétisme puise sa source dans la lumière des prairies fraîches, des douces collines et des pâturages battus par le vent. 

Share

Chihuly in Montreal: A video based review

By Brad Copping

 

 

In the summer and fall of 2013, just down the street from Canada’s oldest commercial gallery specializing in Canadian art glass, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts hosted a major exhibition of American glass artist, Dale Chihuly, called Utterly Breathtaking.  The exhibition was a spectacular success for the museum with hundreds of thousands of viewers paying the $20 admission fee.  The exhibition has its own website where you can see a video and much more.  The museum has also launched a public campaign to raise enough funds to purchase the piece, which graced the streets of Montreal during the run of the exhibition.

The video in the link contains images from the exhibition as well as reviews by two visitors to the exhibition.  Steve Tippin, current President of the Glass Art Association of Canada, was very skeptical of Chihuly’s work.  Before the show, he thought that Chihuly lovers were simply uninformed of the other glass artists working within the glass scene but, as it turns out, perhaps Tippin dismissed Chihuly too easily.  Tippin has his BFA in Sculpture and Printmaking from the University of Guelph, went to Sheridan College for Glass, and then received his Masters in Glass from the Rochester Institute of Technology.  Susan Belyea, a former glass artist working under the moniker Glass Roots out of her own studio in Kingston, Ontario, is now a PhD candidate at Queens University.  On her visit to the exhibition, Belyea was accompanied by friends who knew nothing about glass, and she felt that this was a refreshing experience, which taught her something about seeing an art show.  The video footage and photographs were taken by Brad Copping in September of 2013.  The final video was produced in February of 2014.

The link to video is http://youtu.be/t3bU4DBMQvQ

Share

Bringing the Glass Community Together

November 14, 2013

By Becky Lauzon

 

On a very hot and humid September 7th 2013, over 130 glass artists from across Ontario and parts of Quebec flocked together for the first – and hopefully not the last – Glass Gathering.  The Glass Gathering, which was not affiliated with Sheridan College or the Glass Art Association of Canada (GAAC) and was completely volunteer-based, was an all-day free event, held at Sheridan College, and was open to anyone with a love for glass. Organizers Megan Smith, Sylvie Jensen and Steven Tippin, along with their army of volunteers, had a full day of activities in which those attending the gathering could participate.

 

Bringing the Glass Community Together 1

 Sally McCubbin, Blaise Campbell and Roxanne Tochor Giving the first hotshop demo of the day

 

The day began at 10am with the first talk by Ian Milligan, entitled “Ian’s Detour.”  The talks were meant to allow anyone to speak!  Talks were given by gallery owners, recent graduates and everyone in between.  Topics ranged from the obscure, such as Jesse Bromm’s “Taxidermy, Talk and Demo,” and Eric Covington’s “High Efficiency Melters,” to Renato Foti’s “Progression in Glass” and Tanya Lyons’ “Taking Traces.” With each talk running approximately 15 minutes, plenty of opportunity was allowed for people to hear what interests them without missing a punty transfer in the hot shop. Demos were occurring simultaneously throughout the day by artists such as Mike Gray, Blaise Campbell and Andy Kuntz.  For those participants whose focus leaned more toward flameworking, there were demos by Emma Gerard, Matt Robertson and Mathieu Grodet. With so many things going on, it made for an eventful day with attendees only stopping briefly to enjoy the free lunch provided by the Sheridan Alumni Association and to discuss ideas, work methods and build new friendships and connections with familiar and new faces.

 

Bringing the Glass Community Together 2

Clayton Haigh , Kristen Spreen and James Wardhaugh proudly parading their glass dragon during the glass Olympics

 

Once everyone was full from lunch and made their way back to the glass studio, they had the opportunity to bid on items in the silent auction. Organized by Gabby Wilson, the silent auction featured donations from some of the people attending the Glass Gathering 2013. Those in attendance had the opportunity to bid on items that varied from glass pieces made by their peers, to vintage prints from an old glass dictionary, to the truly bizarre – a free chauffeur for an evening. Overall the silent auction brought in $3,095, which was split between a donation to GAAC and funding for future Glass Gatherings.

As the day came to an end, there was one last opportunity for those who had not given a talk or demo to participate and to show off their skills in the Glass Olympics. With four teams of five people, each team consisted of one sand caster and the rest were made up from students and professionals whose names were randomly drawn. The teams really had no idea what they were about to get themselves into as they set up their benches and anxiously waited for the four judges – Steven Tippin, Sally McCubbin, Benjamin Kikkert and Sue Rankin – to announce the first of three rounds in the Olympics. The three challenges were:  one-handed chalice-making; a magic stick, where teams were challenged to make as many cups as they could using nothing but a ceramic tile; and, creation of a sculptural representation of their team that they could parade around the hot shop. Off to the side, each team’s sand caster was busy with their own challenges as they competed in Pictionary, a tapered-pour challenge and in a speed-pour challenge. In the end, the scores were very close, but the blue team consisting of James Wardhaugh, David Thompson, Clayton Haigh, Mathieu Grodet and Kristen Spreen, won with their rendition of a molten glass Chinese dragon. As judge Benjamin Kikkert stated, “There’s no beating a glass dragon.”

 

Bringing the Glass Community Together 3

Andy Kuntz impressed by Nick Chase’s design for the Glass Gatherings 2013 t-shirt design

 

With the Olympics done and the hotshop cleanup in action, there was nothing left for participants to do but head to a local restaurant to continue the fun.  But not before they purchased their official Glass Gathering 2013 t-shirt, designed by Nick Chase in an online contest prior to the event.  An overall amazing day, where old friends were given the opportunity to catch up, and new friends and connections were made by all. The Glass Gathering 2013 will be a hard event to beat, but everyone in attendance is already anxiously waiting to see how the Glass Gathering 2014 will top it.

 

Becky Lauzon is in her 3rd year in the Glass program at Sheridan College.

 

 

Rassembler la communauté du verre
Par Becky Lauzon

 

Le 7 septembre 2013, par une belle journée chaude et humide, plus de 130 artistes venant de tout l’Ontario et d’une partie du Québec sont venus assister au premier (rassemblement de verriers (Glass Gathering) mais pas le dernier, espérons-le. Entièrement dû à l’action de bénévoles, cet évènement gratuit ne dépendant ni du Sheridan College, ni de l’Association du Verre d’Art du Canada (GAAC) s’est déroulé sur une journée complète. Le rassemblemet a pris place au Sheridan College et a ouvert ses portes à tous ceux présentant un intérêt pour le verre. Les organisateurs Megan Smith, Sylvie Jensens et Steven Tippin, accompagnés de leur armée de bénévoles, avaient prévu une journée remplie d’activités auxquelles ont pu contribuer tous les participants.

 

Bringing the Glass Community Together 1

Sally McCubbin, Blaise Campbell and Roxanne Tochor Giving the first hotshop demo of the day

 

La journée débuta à 10 heures avec la première conférence animée par Ian Milligan intitulée « Le détour d’Ian ». Les conférences ont permis de donner la parole à chacun ,galeristes, élèves récemment diplômés et bien d’autres personnes sont intervenus. Les sujets étaient très variés, allant de l’obscure tels que  «Taxidermie, débat et démo » de Jesse Bromm, « Les fondeurs les plus efficaces » d’Eric Covington à la « Progression du verre » de Renato Foti ou « Suivre les traces » de Tanya Lyons. Chaque débat durant environ 15 minutes. Cela  donna aux gens la possibilité d’assister à ce qui les intéressait le plus sans manquer pour autant un transfert de verre entre cannes dans l’atelier. Des démonstrations furent données en parallèle durant la journée par des artistes tels que Mike Gray, Blaise Campbell et Andy Kuntz. Pour ceux dont l’intérêt portait plus sur le travail au chalumeau, Emma Gerard, Matt Robertson et Mathieu Grodet firent aussi des démonstrations. Avec tant de choses au programme, les participants n’eurent que le temps de s’arrêter pour apprécier un repas offert par la Sheridan Alumni Association. Ils en profitèrent pour échanger leurs idées, méthodes de travail et consolider relations et réseaux grâce à d’anciennes retrouvailles et de nouvelles rencontres.

 

Bringing the Glass Community Together 2

Clayton Haigh , Kristen Spreen and James Wardhaugh proudly parading their glass dragon during the glass Olympics

 

Une fois tout le monde repus et retourné à l’atelier de verre, il fut proposé aux personnes de  participer à une vente aux enchères sous plis. Organisée par Gabby Wilson, cette vente aux enchères proposait des objets donnés par certains participants du “Glass Gathering” 2013. Ceux qui le désiraient ont pu enchérir sur une sélection d’articles aussi variés que des œuvres en verre et des images vintage provenant d’un ancien dictionnaire du verre, et même aussi curieux qu’un chauffeur gratuit pour une soirée. Au total, l’enchère rapporta quelques $3,095 qui furent répartis entre une donation à la GAAC et des fonds pour le prochain rassemblement en 2014.

Ceux qui n’avaient pu prendre la parole ou faire de démonstration jusque-là eurent une dernière chance à la fin de la journée de montrer leur talent en participant aux Olympiques du Verre. 4 équipes de 5 personnes furent tirées au sort, chacune étant composée d’un polisseur, d’étudiants et de professionnels. En s’installant sur les bancs, les équipes n’avaient aucune idée de ce qui les attendait jusqu’à l’arrivée des 4 juges

Steven Tippin, Sally McCubbin, Benjamin Kikkert et Sue Rankin. Ces derniers leurs ont annoncé trois épreuves : faire un vase avec une seule main, réaliser une baguette magique, faire le plus de tasses possible dans une seule plaque de céramique et créer une sculpture qui représentera le trophée de l’équipe. Chaque polisseur avait son propre défi  comprenant une épreuve de fuselage et une épreuve de vitesse. Les scores finaux furent très serrés mais l’équipe des bleus composée de James Wardhaugh, David Thompson, Clayton Haigh, Mathieu Grodet et Kristen Spreen, finit par remporter la partie grâce à son interprétation d’un dragon chinois en verre. Alors juge, Benjamin Kikkert déclara : « Rien ne peut battre le dragon chinois ».

Bringing the Glass Community Together 3

Andy Kuntz impressed by Nick Chase’s design for the Glass Gatherings 2013 t-shirt design

Une fois les Olympiques terminés et l’atelier rangé, il ne resta plus au participants qu’à se rendre au restaurant du coin pour poursuivre les festivités. Les participants ont  acheter leur t-shirt officiel du “Glass Gathering” 2013 bien sûr, réalisé par Nick Chase, vainqueur du concours en ligne qui fut organisé avant l’événement. Une journée magnifique dans l’ensemble pendant laquelle les vieux amis ont pu rattraper le temps perdu et de nouvelles amitiés voir le jour. Difficile de faire mieux que le “Glass Gathering” 2013, mais chacun présent à l’évènement attend déjà avec impatience de voir comment le “Glass Gathering” 2014 pourra le surpasser.

Becky Lauzon est étudiante en 3e année du programme Verre au Sheridan College.

 

 

Share
//