Lessons we Learn from Glass

June 30, 2016

Author: Diana Fox

I’ve been a volunteer for GAAC since 2010 and my main contribution has been interviewing GAAC members for content for the GAAC Facebook page. Since our first interview back in December 2010, I’ve connected with over 60 GAAC members.

 

As much as our members are all unique and special in both the work they create and the contributions they make to the Canadian glass community, there are commonalities that keep us all drawn together. Perhaps in another six years I will be able to provide some charts or Venn diagrams to illustrate these, but in the interim, allow me to provide some insights I have gained about Canadian glass artists over the last six years.

 

Bastian, Ward. Highlights 13, Light Jet Print Rear-mounted on Plexi-glass, 2011. (Photo Ward Bastian)

Bastian, Ward. Highlights 13, Light Jet Print Rear-mounted on Plexi-glass, 2011. (Photo Ward Bastian)

 

Everyone has a reason for coming to glass and everyone has a reason for staying with it, but not everyone came to it on purpose.

The first question that everyone gets asked is what brings them to glass in the first place and, while there are numerous artists who identify glass’ specific qualities as the thing that drew them in, there are just as many artists that come across glass serendipitously or totally by accident. The commonality amongst everyone is that once they’ve discovered glass, there is no going back. People who fall in love with glass do so because there is no other material that can communicate what they need or want to say. Christy Haldane summed this experience of discovering glass accidentally nicely: “Like many glass artists before me, I started at Sheridan College with every intention of becoming a furniture maker. For our first year, first project, Kevin Lockau asked us, “what is god?” and that intrigued me. I wanted to answer that question more than I wanted to make furniture. The vocabulary that glass offers has played a role in my interest in glass as a material.”

 

Haldane, Christy.  It Takes a Village (excerpt from African Proverb), Glass, concrete, reclaimed dock wood and steel, 2012. (Photo Parks Canada)

Haldane, Christy. It Takes a Village (excerpt from African Proverb), Glass, concrete, reclaimed dock wood and steel, 2012. (Photo Parks Canada)

 

No one talks about glass the way they talk about any other material—if you didn’t know better, you really would think that glass was a living thing that you wrangled into an artwork or object.

Perhaps this is the nature of the material itself: glass is a notoriously finicky material to work with and it requires very specific conditions to accomplish specific results. Ward Bastian articulated this beautifully when he was interviewed in May 2011: “it is a profound experience to work with a material that moves so freely when it’s hot, but is so unbending once it cools.” Working with these unusual qualities—and ultimately having to make enough sense of them to create something—leaves a mark on all of us and we each come away with our own understanding of what glass is as material. This concept was best described by Julia Reimer: “I think glass is like nature, it has its own way and even when you struggle to control it, it has its own schedule and agenda. It is like a river finding its path around a dam. So I think glass has its own properties and, to work with it, you have to consider that. It can be pretty tolerant of what you impose upon it but you have to account for its own nature.”

 

Reimer, Julia.  Cocoon, blown glass, 2012.  (Photo courtesy of Julia Reimer)

Reimer, Julia. Cocoon, blown glass, 2012. (Photo courtesy of Julia Reimer)

 

Glass is not an easy material to work with and no one pretends that it is.

I think it is easy for an artistic lifestyle to get glamorized, but it isn’t something I’ve encountered very frequently amongst GAAC members. I’ve always been struck by the honesty of our members and how willing they are to be so totally forthcoming with the realities of life as a glass artist. It is not easy, it is not always financially rewarding and it is often something we do when we get spare moments from living otherwise busy lives. Certainly other materials come with struggles, but as glass is often a costly material to work with, these struggles are ones I’ve realized are pretty common amongst all of us and something we all have to reconcile in our own individual practices. Jamie Gray spoke to the challenges she faces in her own career: “ok, first of all, as we all know, you don’t make a lot of coin doing this. Seriously, I’d do tons better working for Green Drop. So making enough money to pay for supplies, etc., is probably the biggest challenge. And then, on top of that, how about that huge challenge of making work for the work’s sake instead of for pay’s sake? It’s a circular conundrum. But there it is. We do what we do because we love it so much. I’m even so fortunate as to have a wonderful husband who pays the mortgage and makes sure food gets on the table and gas in the car, but there’s still that societal pressure to “pay your own way” (maybe that’s that puritanical Bible-belt in my head again). I guess that’s what I find to be the greatest challenge: just relaxing and making the work that must be made in order to get my message across and making production pieces as I need to in order to purchase more glass. Most of us are in that spot, I imagine, to one degree or another, at one time or another.”

 

Gray, Jamie.  Telling The Bees, Gaffer lead crystal, brass wire, bee, gold leaf, 2016. (Photo courtesy of Jamie Gray)

Gray, Jamie. Telling The Bees, Gaffer lead crystal, brass wire, bee, gold leaf, 2016. (Photo courtesy of Jamie Gray)

 

Whatever you think glass is, someone out there is using it in a way you never even imagined possible.  

If I have learned anything at all through all my conversations with Canadian glass artists around the country, it is that they are coming up with ways to use glass that are constantly surprising and inspiring. In all seriousness, the work of the GAAC membership is really fantastic. I love scrolling through the profiles on the GAAC website to see the work of our members and it is there that I discovered how virtually every glass artist in Canada takes their own unique approach to glass as a material. From Brad Copping’s mirrored canoe to Teresa Burrows’ exquisite beaded creations, the works of the GAAC membership really challenge the notions of what glass is and can be. Learning about our Canadian glass artists has been a privilege and I encourage everyone to spend some time looking through these interviews—there is much to learn about Canadian glass through them:

 

Ward Bastian was our interviewee May 2011.

Christy Haldane was our interviewee September 2015.

Julia Reimer was our interviewee July 2013.

Jamie Gray was our interviewee July 2011.

 

To read these and other member interviews in full, please visit the GAAC Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Glass-Art-Association-of-Canada-89639673869/

 

Authors Biography: Diana Fox graduated from the Alberta College of Art + Design in 2010.  She has been the Social Media Coordinator for GAAC since that same year.

Leçons que l’on apprend du verre

Auteur: Diana Fox

Je suis une volontaire(bénévole) pour GAAC depuis 2010 et ma contribution majeure est de procéder à des entrevues entre les menbres de GAAC pour le contenu de la page Facebook de GAAC. Depuis notre premiere entrevue en decembre 2010,j’ai fais la rencontre de plus de 60 membres.

 

En fait nos menbres sont tous uniques et spéciaux dans les deux facettes des travaux créatifs et des contributions qu’ils font pour la communauté  Canadienne du verre et ils ont des choses communes qui les  attirent ensemble. Peut-être que dans les 6 prochaines années  je serai capable de vous donner des diagrammes  ou (Venn?) diagrams pour illustrer cet chose mais pour l’instant laissez-moi vous donner un apercu  des  bénéfices que j’ai constaté à  propos des artistes canadiens  de verre depuis c’est dernier 6 ans.

 

Bastian, Ward. Highlights 13, Light Jet Print Rear-mounted on Plexi-glass, 2011. (Photo Ward Bastian)

Bastian, Ward. Highlights 13, Light Jet Print Rear-mounted on Plexi-glass, 2011. (Photo Ward Bastian)

 

TOUT LE MONDE A UNE RAISON DE S’INTERESSER AU VERRE ET TOUT LE MONDE A UNE RAISON DE CONTINUER A S’Y INTÉRESSER  MAIS PAS TOUT LE MONDE S’Y INTÉRESSE  AVEC INTENTION.

La premiere question que tout le monde se fait demander est: qu’est-ce qui vous as incité  à  vouloir travailler avec le verre en premier et tandis que plusieurs  artistes  identifient le verre avec ces qualités  spécifiques  est la chose qui les as attirés ,il y a aussi plusieurs artistes qui découvrent le verre  totalement  par accident.La chose commune entre tous est qu’une fois qu’il on decouvet le verre, il ny a pas de retour en arriere. Les gens qui tombent en amour avec le verre font cela parce qu’il ny as pas d’autre materiaux qui peu communiquer ce qu’ils ont besoin ou ce qu’ils veulent exprimer. Christy Haldane a decrit son experience de sa découverte du verre, comme un joli accident.” Come plusieurs arstistes de verre avant moi,j’ai commencé  mes études  au College Sheridon avec  intention de devenir un fabriquant de meubles. Pour notre première  année ,premier projet,  Kevin Lockau nous a demandé: “Qu’est -ce que Dieu?” et cela ma intriguée. Je voulais la réponse  à  cette  question plus que je voulais fabriquer des meubles. Le vocabulaire que le verre offre a joué  un rôle X dans mes interets avec le verre en fait de materiel.”

 

Haldane, Christy.  It Takes a Village (excerpt from African Proverb), Glass, concrete, reclaimed dock wood and steel, 2012. (Photo Parks Canada)

Haldane, Christy. It Takes a Village (excerpt from African Proverb), Glass, concrete, reclaimed dock wood and steel, 2012. (Photo Parks Canada)

 

PERSONNE NE PARLE DU VERRE DE LA MÊME   MANIERE QU’IL PARLE  D’UN MATÉRIEL  DIFFERENT. -SI VOUS NE LE CONNAISSIEZ PAS MIEUX, VOUS DEVRIER PENSER QUE LE VERRE EST VIVANT ET QUE VOUS POUVEZ LE REFORMER EN UNE PIÈCE  D’ART OU UN OBJET.

Peut-être que c’est la nature du matériel  lui-même. Le verre est un matériel  avec lequel on doit travailler avec minutie et qui requiert  des conditions très particulières   pour accomplir des résultats  specifiques. Ward Bastion a  magnifiquement expliqué cela dans son entrevue de Mai 2011: “C’est une expérience  profonde de travailler avec ce matériel  qui coule si librement quant il est en état  chaud , mais si solide quand il est en état  froid.”  Travailler avec ces qualités  uniques  et créer de façon à donner un sens ultime à  quelque chose  qui nous laisse une marque à  nous tous et nous laisse avec notre propre comprehension de ce qu’est   le verre en fait de matériel . Ce concept est bien décrit  par Julia Reimer:” Je pense que le verre est comme la nature ,il a ses propres manières  et même  si vous luttez à  le contrôler, il a ses propres intentions . C’est comme une rivière  qui trouve son passage autour d’un barrage.Je pense que le verre a ses propres propriétés  et pour travailler avec, vous devez prendre cela en consideration. Il peut-être  vraiment tolérant  à  ce quoi vous lui imposer mais vous devez prendre en considération  de sa propre nature.

 

Reimer, Julia.  Cocoon, blown glass, 2012.  (Photo courtesy of Julia Reimer)

Reimer, Julia. Cocoon, blown glass, 2012. (Photo courtesy of Julia Reimer)

 

LE VERRE N’EST PAS UN MATÉRIEL  FACILE À  MANIPULER ET PERSONNE  NE PRÉTEND  QU’IL NE L’EST PAS.

Je pense que cest facile pour un artiste et son style de vie d’être  prestigieux mais ce n’est pas quelque chose que j’ai rencontré  fréquemment  parmis les menbres de GAAC. J’ai toujours  été  impressionnée  par la sincérité  de nos menbres et être  volontaire à  être  totallement franc avec les réalités  de la vie comme artiste de verre. Ce n’est pas facile ,ce n’est pas toujours financierement récompensé  et c’est aussi souvent quelque chose que l’on fait en consacrant du temps en surplus dans notre vie  qui est deja tres active. Certainement  d’autres matériaux  ont d’autres problèmes  mais le verre est souvent très  dispendieux comme matériel  de travail. J’ai réalisé que ses problèmes  son souvent communs pour nous tous et quelque fois nous devons nous reconcilier avec notre propre pratique individuelle. Jamie Gray a parlé  des defis qu’elle rencontre dans sa propre carrière .”OK en premier comme on le sais on ne fait pas beaucoup de sous a faire cela. Sérieusement, je ferait mieux à travailler pour Green Drop. Alors, faire assez d’argent pour payer  les matériaux ,etc est probablement le plus gros defits. En plus  le tout est de réaliser  une piece  pour sa qualité  au lieu de sa valeur monétaire  cest un cercle vicieux. Mais cela est ce qu’il en ait on fait ce que l’on fait parce que nous aimons cela beaucoup. Je suis aussi tres privilégiée d’avoir un mari merveilleux qui paye l’hypothèque  et s’assure qu’il y a de la nourriture sur la table et de l’essence pour la voiture, mais il y a aussi les pressions sociales d’avoir à  ”payer son propre chemin”[peut-etre que c'est ma religion puritaine dans ma tete encore].Je pense que c’est ce que je trouve être  le plus gros défi : juste relaxer en créant  le travail qui doit être  construit dans un ordre qui délivre  mon message au monde et produise des pieces qui me permettent d’acheter plus de verre. La pluspart de nous tous sont dans la meme position, j’imagine dans un degré  ou un autre, dans un temp ou un autre.

 

Gray, Jamie.  Telling The Bees, Gaffer lead crystal, brass wire, bee, gold leaf, 2016. (Photo courtesy of Jamie Gray)

Gray, Jamie. Telling The Bees, Gaffer lead crystal, brass wire, bee, gold leaf, 2016. (Photo courtesy of Jamie Gray)

 

QUOIQUE   VOUS PUISSIEZ PENSER À CE QU’EST LE VERRE , QUELQU’UN DANS LE MONDE L’UTILISE D’UNE MANIERE TELLE  QUE VOUS NE L’AURIER JAMAIS CRUE POSSIBLE.

Si j’ai appris quelque chose  durant mes conversation avec les artistes Canadiens de verre dans le pays,c’est qu’ils inventent des moyens de se servir du verre qui son constamment curieuses et une source d’inspiration. En toute sincérité, le travail des menbres de CAAG est vraiment fantastique. J’adore regarder les profiles sur le site CAAG à  voir les travaux que les membres  créent et c’est là  que je découvre  comment les artistes Canadiens ont  leur propre approche avec le materiel qu’est le verre. De Brad Copping’s avec son canoe en miroir, de Teresa Burrows’ superbe création  de perle, les travaux des menbres de GAAC vraiment défient l’idée de quoi le verre  peut être . Apprendre à  propos des artistes Canadiens de verre a été  un privilège  et j’encourage tout le monde à prendre le temps de lire   ces entrevues  car il i as’ beaucoup à  decouvrir à  propos du verre Canadien par ces artistes.

 

Ward Bastian a été  en entrevue issue Mai 2011

Christy Haldane a été  en entrevue issue Septembre 2015

Julia Reimer a été  en entrevue issue Juillet 2013

Jamie Gray a été  en entrevue issue Juillet 2011

 

Pour lire ces entrevues au complet et autres s’il vous plaît   visiter le site sur la page de GAAC Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Glass-Art-Association-of-Canada-89639673869/

 

Biographie  de L’auteur:

Diana Fox est graduée  de l’Alberta College des Arts et dessins de 2010.Elle est la coordinnatrice du media social de GAAC depuis cette année .

Share

Leave a Reply

//