A Fitting End to an Era: The Final Graduating Class of the Sheridan College Advanced Diploma, Crafts and Design, Glass Program

June 30, 2016

Author: Paola Crossley

 

2016 will be the final year that students graduate from Sheridan College’s Advanced Diploma, Crafts and Design, Glass Program. The college has been a touchstone for the glass community since this program first launched back in 1969. No one could have predicted its longevity or the new direction the college embarked on two years ago when Sheridan first introduced a Bachelor program in Craft and Design. The change brought a shift to a multi-disciplinary approach and the addition of a fourth year. I am part of the new. But I, and the rest of my cohort, owe a huge debt to those who came before.

In a lesser group of people, you might have had discord between the two factions. But not here. As first year students, we must have been as pesky as a young brother or sister trying to keep up. As the wiser older sibling, the third years (as we affectionately call them) were patient, encouraging and supportive. In their own unique way, each one of them has left their mark on us.

I had the privilege of interviewing each graduate for this article. Previously, if you had asked me if I knew them, I would have said yes. In reality, the interviews showed me how little I really knew about them—about what compelled them to work in glass, what inspired them and what their hopes and dreams are for the future.

Some are flameworkers, others are hotshop aficionados and others still are sand and kiln casters. Each one of them approaches glass differently, but what they all have in common are a passion for glass, a commitment to excellence and a desire to just keep working. I encourage you to take the time to read their artist profiles and get to know them as I did—as professionals starting a career in the wonderful world of glass.

 

Cator, Will. Motorcycle (2016), borosilicate glass, 7”H x 3”W x 10”D. (Photo: Will Cator)

Cator, Will. Motorcycle (2016), borosilicate glass, 7”H x 3”W x 10”D. (Photo: Will Cator)


 

Will Cator

Will Cator’s life revolves around motorcycles. He parlayed his passion for these machines into a successful career as a motorcycle wrangler for various movies that are shot in-and-around the Greater Toronto Area. His second love is working with glass. As a flameworker and a sandcaster, his work is inspired by his motorcycle passion and the tools of the trade. His ongoing series of detailed miniature motorcycle sculptures and Harley pendants in borosilicate glass attest to this passion. Lately, he has been focussing on honing his skills by casting life-size wrenches and other tools in blue glass. He desires to continue to focus on his flameworking skills and improve his ability to accurately capture bike culture.

Will anticipates a career that includes glass but is focused on his love of motorcycles. He is happiest when he manages to combine both worlds. Sheridan provided a strong sense of community similar to that of the bike world. This sense of community is what Will foresees missing the most.

www.molassesglass.bigcartel.com

 

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Vase (2016), Incalmo, murrini roll-up, 13”H x 7.5”W x 5”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Vase (2016), Incalmo, murrini roll-up, 13”H x 7.5”W x 5”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

 

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Bowl (2016), sculpted flower hot attached to blown bowl, 6”H x 9”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Bowl (2016), sculpted flower hot attached to blown bowl, 6”H x 9”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

 

 

Geoffrey Crozier

Geoffrey Crozier first started blowing glass when he attended a certificate program at the Haliburton School of the Arts. During his four-month stay at the school, he spent hours practicing glass techniques every day.

From the time of his childhood, Geoffrey has always enjoyed working with his hands. Prior to glass blowing, he developed skills in other mediums such as welding, woodworking, ceramics and sculpting and he continues to explore various mediums today.

While attending Sheridan College, Geoffrey worked with the resident artist, Mathieu Grodet, and soon discovered his love for Venetian glass. Mathieu taught him some of the fundamental skills used in Venetian glassblowing – traditional techniques that Geoffrey intends to continue to explore.

After graduation and a summer session at Pilchuck studying with Debora Moore, Geoffrey plans to travel to both Seattle and Murano to further his knowledge of glass making.

geoffreyjcrozier@gmail.com

 

Davis, Melani. The Rose (2014), kiln cast glass, 15”H x 5.5”W x 2.5”D. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. The Rose (2014), kiln cast glass, 15”H x 5.5”W x 2.5”D. (Photo: Melani Davis)

 

Davis, Melani. Rough Water (2016), fused glass, 18”H x 28”W. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. Rough Water (2016), fused glass, 18”H x 28”W. (Photo: Melani Davis)

 

Melani Davis

Melani Davis discovered a passion for glass later in life, after retiring from her teaching career. Her passion started innocently enough, with a class in beading, and continued with classes in stained glass, fusing and flameworking. These part-time classes only further fueled her devotion. Unsatisfied, Melani decided to embrace her passion and enroll in the Advanced Diploma program for glass at Sheridan.

Melani’s keen observance of the world and the changes that have occurred over her lifetime are the inspiration for the work she creates from fused and kiln cast glass. After losing both siblings and a mother to illness, her current work vacillates between celebrating life and mourning loss. Her Jewish heritage, sustainability and poverty are other themes that Melani continues to explore.

A number of years ago, Melani built a small home studio and gallery where she has the ability to quietly pursue her work and display her craft. Now that she has graduated, Melani intends to expand the scope of her practice and eventually teach flameworking and kiln casting from her studio.

melani.davis@gmail.com

melanidaviscreations.com

 

Di Mascio, Eric. Currents (2016), glass, canvas, 72”H x 24”W. (Photo: Calyssa Erb)

Di Mascio, Eric. Currents (2016), glass, canvas, 72”H x 24”W. (Photo: Calyssa Erb)

 

Di Mascio, Eric. Phantom Limb Calf, (2016), cast glass, prosthetic thigh and foot, 20"H x 5"W x 5”D. (Photo: Eric Di Mascio)

Di Mascio, Eric. Phantom Limb Calf, (2016), cast glass, prosthetic thigh and foot, 20″H x 5″W x 5”D. (Photo: Eric Di Mascio)

 

Eric Di Mascio

Eric Di Mascio’s traumatic childhood has had a profound influence on his work. He was seven years old when his father lost a limb to cancer. The illness was not common knowledge at the time and Eric was alarmed when he returned home one day to find his father physically changed. Doctors could provide a prosthetic limb to increase mobility but they had no solution for the phantom pain that came from the missing limb. The idea of humanizing the prosthetic and providing solace for his torment is what drives Eric’s work.

Eric creates his sculptural work using both kiln and sandcasting methods. He is influenced by classical ideals and he uses these influences as he strives to breathe life into the limbs of his Phantom Pain series. “I am interested in capturing a pure, raw feeling that can be both beautiful and sad.”

Eric’s dream is to share his love of glass with others. He intends to advance his glass studies with the potential of entering teacher’s college in the future. In addition to his Phantom Pain work, Eric will continue to explore ways of capturing static movement in his installation work.

dimascio.eric@gmail.com

 

Fayad, Hannan. Untitled (2016), blown glass, sandblasted, 11” H x 11” D. (Photo: Hannan Fayad)

Fayad, Hannan. Untitled (2016), blown glass, sandblasted, 11” H x 11” D. (Photo: Hannan Fayad)

 

Hannan Fayad

Inspired by the effects of erosion and the texture of timeworn materials, Hannan Fayad replicates this condition by sandblasting the exteriors of her blown glass pieces. She began with the notion of creating indents, craters and small holes on the surface. Over time, she perfected the technique to create her signature luminous, hole-filled orbs. The end result is a study of light and shadow play that continues to fascinate her.

Hannan came to Sheridan excited about the prospect of learning to blow glass. She enjoys the logical aspect of working glass, but her focus remains firmly rooted in the myriad of creative possibilities that the material provides. Skill development and experimentation are important, not only in her hot shop work, but also in the work she creates by sandcasting over organic materials. She is intrigued by the possibilities these processes provide for her ongoing exploration of texture.

Hannan will be heading back to London, ON, with the hopes of forming a small artist collective with her ceramicist partner. In the meantime, she is looking to purchase a sandblaster to continue experimenting with her spheres. Future work includes creating installation work with her forms.

hannanfayad@gmail.com

 

Ferguson, Reid. Jacob Street (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.5”H x 10.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. Jacob Street (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.5”H x 10.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

 

Ferguson, Reid. KW Railroad Set- (left to right) King and Victoria, Strange Street, Westmount and Westwood, (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.75”H x 8.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. KW Railroad Set- (left to right) King and Victoria, Strange Street, Westmount and Westwood, (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.75”H x 8.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

 

Reid Ferguson

Reid Ferguson can trace his love of graffiti art back to his youth when he was first exposed to Shepard Fairey, the American contemporary street artist, graphic designer, activist and founder of OBEY Clothing. Shepard proved that graffiti and urban decay could be beautiful. Reid is inspired by the discarded, often-ignored areas where graffiti artists ply their trade. These hidden nooks and crannies provide alone space and instill him with a sense of connectedness and spirituality that others find in church.

He explores these ideas in his work. His fused glass and concrete bowls are layered with found and created imagery that Reid further manipulates. He also creates graphic statements using standard graffiti techniques such as the throw-up: a technique using a one colour outline and one colour fill. Although a throw-up is traditionally used for quick execution, Reid’s work is often a mediation on his desire for connection.

Reid will continue working in glass while exploring other mediums including using found objects. After all, he believes that you, “don’t need high quality materials to create work. Work with what you have and do something with that.” This is the ultimate manifestation of a practice based on urban decay.

reidhferguson@gmail.com

 

Ireson, Dani. Segment (2016), sandcast, graphite cast, and laminated glass, 15” H x 2.75” W x 2.75” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Segment (2016), sandcast, graphite cast, and laminated glass, 15” H x 2.75” W x 2.75” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

 

Ireson, Dani. Soft Mountain (2016), laminated float glass and stone, 4” H x 3.5” W x 1.5” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Soft Mountain (2016), laminated float glass and stone, 4” H x 3.5” W x 1.5” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Dani Ireson

During a recent road trip through California, Dani Ireson was captivated by the rock striations that seemed to emphasize the passage of time. Inspired by a desire to make permanent that which is fleeting, Dani created a series of works using laminated glass and rock. The use of found and mixed-media materials is typical of her work as she regularly explores new processes, materials and techniques.

Dani enjoys everything about glass, from the team aspect of the hot shop to the meditative state of coldworking. She successfully combines her knowledge of glass blowing, hot sculpting, sandcasting and coldworking with other materials to create decorative and functional works. But it is the creation process itself that she enjoys the most. “Breathing life into glass and watching it change in front of you is an experience I will never tire of.”

Dani enjoys sharing her love of glass and her knowledge with other students. She hopes to one-day parlay into a teaching role. For the time being, she is focusing on developing her skills while assisting Paull Rodrigue in his Dundas, ON studio and building a small coldworking shop in her home.

www.danielleireson.com

ireson.aout@gmail.com

Instagram – @Danielleiresonglass

 

Kimber, Loni. in(FINITE) (2016), blown glass, concrete, 27.5” H x 5.7” W x 6.5”D. (Photo: Loni Kimber)

Kimber, Loni. in(FINITE) (2016), blown glass, concrete, 27.5” H x 5.7” W x 6.5”D. (Photo: Loni Kimber)

 

Loni Kimber

Like most curious children, Loni Kimber just wanted to touch things and push all the buttons—literally. This playfulness comes through in her work as a glass blower, fuser and kiln caster. Her vibrant, fused half-spheres just beg to be touched while her sculptural works focus on movement, light and the bright candy-inspired colours she remembers from her youth. Just like a curious child, Loni creates by making mistakes, choices, experimenting and embracing happenstance.

Loni had an opportunity to incorporate all of these interests during a recent class at Urban Glass in Brooklyn where she studied neon. Her tube series attempts to capture the colour, line, shape and aspect of light that neon provides but without the limitations of working with the material.

Next steps for Loni include heading to Pilchuck this summer to study with her idols Anna Mlasowsky and Matthew Szösz. After that, she sees herself continuing her glass exploration by learning from others and cultivating any opportunity that presents itself. “Relationships will make the difference and I am excited about the future.”

lonikimber@gmail.com

 

Legere, Angela. Yvonne (2016), fused glass body cast, 19”H x 14” W (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Yvonne (2016), fused glass body cast, 19”H x 14” W (Photo: Angela Legere)

 

Legere, Angela. Nesting Bowls (2016), cast glass, Set of 3 – 6”D, 8”D, 10”D. (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Nesting Bowls (2016), cast glass, Set of 3 – 6”D, 8”D, 10”D. (Photo: Angela Legere)

 

Angela Legere

After three years at Sheridan, exploring glass making in all its forms, Angela Legere found a passion for mold making. This technical and inherently reflective process provided an outlet for her work on gender equality and human rights issues. As a sharp observer of human nature, Angela explores these themes in her Fertility series with body castings of the female form. “From lovers’ hands and babies’ feet to full body torsos, I find capturing moments in time a very rewarding process.”

Although Angela no longer lives in British Columbia, her functional work is inspired by the natural beauty of the mountains and ocean she remembers from that time. She feels a similar sense of awe when she works with glass.

After graduation, Angela is looking forward to travelling. She hopes to further her understanding of the issues faced by those less fortunate and discover the common threads that connect us all. On her return, Angela will be moving her practice to South River, ON, where she has an opportunity to set up a small studio and where she will be able to provide classes for local enthusiasts.

www.legereglass.com

legereglass@gmail.com

 

Lepiez, Christian. Ninja Pendant (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, 2” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Ninja Pendant (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, 2” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

 

Lepiez, Christian. Holy Balls (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, various sizes from 3” to 6” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Holy Balls (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, various sizes from 3” to 6” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

 

Christian Lepiez

Christian Lepiez discovered glass during a co-op at Glen Williams Glass. Once at Sheridan, it was the technical expertise and precision required that attracted Christian to flameworking. He quickly improved his skills by first replicating the work of others and then finding a way to express his experiences, memories and passions through glass.

Christian’s approach is very meditative and zen-like. He believes that working with glass requires a truth to materials and being open to where it takes you. “I have a rough idea of what I want to do but I let the glass do its own thing.” Using only heat and gravity, he allows the glass to determine the direction. A favourite technique uses dot stacking to create pendants with spider dots, swirls and patterns in graphic colours, which are inspired by skateboard culture. Lace work is another area where he excels.

Christian intends to continue exploring flameworking at his small home studio. He looks forward to experimenting with new techniques and finding opportunities to incorporate recycled glass in his work.

www.lpzglass.bigcartel.com

lpzglass@hotmail.com

 

Leung, Phebe, Mitty Scolds Bitties (2016) Blown glass, hot sculpted, crocheted, 4.7”H  x 5.5”W x 10”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Mitty Scolds Bitties (2016) Blown glass, hot sculpted, crocheted, 4.7”H x 5.5”W x 10”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

 

Leung, Phebe, Feather Bowl (2016), blown glass, 3”H x 4”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Feather Bowl (2016), blown glass, 3”H x 4”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Phebe Leung

Phebe Leung is a woman who embodies playfulness. This can be seen in everything from her hair accessories to her cell phone cover. But this playfulness is especially evident in her whimsical approach to glass. Named after her partner’s nickname, the Mitty series was inspired by both her partner and Phebe’s unique view of the world. “I don’t see people as people, I see them as animals—he seems like a chicken.”

Along with the Mitty series, Phebe enjoys deviating from the standard hot shop forms by creating three-sided vessels. She also delights in the simple beauty of the hot sculpted roses she creates and the blown bowls and paperweights that she finishes with a variety of sandblasting and coldworking techniques.

Phebe enjoyed the sense of community and teamwork that came from being at Sheridan. She feels Sheridan was time well-spent and is interested in returning to complete the bachelor’s program in the near future. In the meantime, she intends to rent studio space and focus on making fused pendants, other kiln cast forms and, with any luck, continuing the Mitty series.

leungph@sheridanc.on.ca

 

Nathan Lister

Nathan Lister doesn’t remember a time when he wasn’t interested in glass. Growing up near the Sandra Ainsley Gallery, he was exposed at an early age to the beauty of glass and the many ways it can be formed. He began his career with a home flameworking set-up before enrolling at Sheridan. Once at Sheridan, he continued working with a torch but soon discovered the hot shop and the possibilities of hot sculpting.

Nathan strives to mimic both the natural and mechanical worlds using symmetry and a variety of techniques such as heat sinks, concentric rings and repetition. He is currently exploring pushing Marias and the attractive effects that can be obtained with repeating these rings—forms that can simulate both bamboo and industrial glass insulators. Nathan also enjoys exploring form in everything from paperweights to jewelry, beads and other items, which he creates in flameworking. To expand his techniques, he works on unique hot sculpted objects, which can vary from aliens to sharks.

Nathan finds the process and production of glass work enjoyable. He will continue to refine his skills and seek new techniques as he ramps up his home studio.

nathanlister1@gmail.com

 

Lozanovski, Lila. Satori 5.2 (2014), float glass, cotton thread, 9.8”H x 13.75”W. (Photo: Jade Chittock)

Lozanovski, Lila. Satori 5.2 (2014), float glass, cotton thread, 9.8”H x 13.75”W. (Photo: Jade Chittock)

 

Lozanovski, Lila. Rose Bowl (2015), kiln cast glass, 5.5”H x 4.75”D x 4.75”W. (Photo: Lila Lozanovski)

Lozanovski, Lila. Rose Bowl (2015), kiln cast glass, 5.5”H x 4.75”D x 4.75”W. (Photo: Lila Lozanovski)

 

Lila Lozanovski

Lila Lozanovski’s passion for glass is fed by the act of making. The process provides her an opportunity for quiet introspection and the freedom to delve into the question of why she feels compelled to create. The work provides comfort and inevitably becomes a marker of her state of mind at that moment. Although Lila currently focuses on kiln and sandcasting, she refuses to be limited by the use of specific materials in her search for answers.

A large part of Lila’s work incorporates roses—sometimes formed in clear glass, other times designed as a multi-hued carpet of blooms—and pedestals, which signify an openness, a desire to share and also a form of respect for the preciousness of the objects held within the bowls. The roses that proliferate to form bowls and bases are crafted by hand-rolling wax into shape. The marks left by her hands are a reminder that beauty lies in imperfection. Unlike the ephemeral moments of our lives, Lila’s roses permanently remain at their peak.

Lila has big plans for the future. First, she is heading to Pilchuck this August for a class with Bryan Jablonski, a glass fabrication specialist. Next, Lila has accepted the role of Teaching Assistant at Sheridan for the 2016/2017 year. But she is most excited about her future plans that include a studio designed as a community hub. Her dream is to engage with the community and other like-minded artists to build a truly unique live/work space where she can collaborate and spend time unleashing the full potential of her creativity. “I don’t want to stop making.”

lilaanks@yahoo.com

 

Walsh, Collin A.G. Kameosa (Sake Set), (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, Bottle - 10”H x 1 - 2.25”D, Glasses - 2.5”H x 2.5”D. (Photo: Chace Diargino)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Kameosa (Sake Set), (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, Bottle – 10”H x 1 – 2.25”D, Glasses – 2.5”H x 2.5”D. (Photo: Chace Diargino)

 

Walsh, Collin A.G. Head Shots, (2014-15), flameworked borosilicate glass, various from 1” – 2.5”H x .75”D. (Photo: Nicholas Driver)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Head Shots, (2014-15), flameworked borosilicate glass, various from 1” – 2.5”H x .75”D. (Photo: Nicholas Driver)

 

Collin Walsh

Collin Walsh is an introspective flameworker who feels that a study of glass provides greater benefits than just the skills learned. As cliché as it sounds, he believes the Sheridan Glass program made him a better person. “I am grateful for Koen [Vanderstukken – Sheridan Glass Studio Head and professor] and Brad [Sherwood – flameworking instructor]. They shaped me as a flameworker but also as a human being and how I see the world.”

Collin was immersed in handcraft from a young age. His mother was a dressmaker, his maternal grandfather was a woodworker and painter and his paternal grandfather was a metalsmith. With an interest in the heritage of craftsmanship, Collin strives to recreate traditional forms with a contemporary twist that manifest from his fascination of the mysterious, mystical, bizarre and surreal. He populates his work with the absurd, such as ghouls and goblins, and brings them to life with his painterly approach to colour.

Collin foresees a gratifying future spent trying to convey his understanding of the world through his glass practice. He will continue his journey at his home flameworking studio.

collinwalsh.cw@gmail.com

www.unclethrasher.bigcartel.com

 

Yule, Max. Glass Flora (2016), hot sculpted glass and cement, 18”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Glass Flora (2016), hot sculpted glass and cement, 18”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

 

Yule, Max. Untitled (2016), hot sculpted glass welded frame, 20”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Untitled (2016), hot sculpted glass welded frame, 20”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Max Yule

Max Yule came to glass because of beer. His interest was first piqued when he watched a colleague at the small brewery where he worked craft drinking cups from the beer bottles. This discovery led to a journey that saw Max move from bead making to a semester-long hotshop program at Haliburton School of the Arts and then on to Sheridan.

His current work focuses on sculptural hanging pieces created in the hot shop and flameworking objects that embrace a scientific aesthetic, which harkens back to his days at the brewery. He is fascinated by everything from the bubbling processes that occur during lab experiments to lab tools and other industrial materials. He intends to merge his two aesthetics into work that redefines the notion of what a chandelier is.

Max is first and foremost a pragmatist. He enjoys both the process and the challenge of working in glass but it is his realization that glass artists need supportive environments in order to flourish that is the driving force behind his latest project. He is in the midst of creating a live/work space in Oshawa for flameworkers with an expected launch date later this year. This type of forward-thinking will ensure there are opportunities for artists to continue to explore glass both today and in the future.

maxcyule@hotmail.com

 

Authors Biography:

Paola Crossley is thrilled to be part of the first group of students in the Sheridan Bachelor of Craft and Design program. She is will be entering her third year of the four-year program this fall.

 

Une époque qui se termine bien: L’ultime promotion du diplôme d’études collégiales en métiers d’art et design –  option verre) du Sheridan College  

Auteur: Paola Crossley

L’année 2016 sera la toute dernière année où des étudiants obtiendront leur diplôme d’études collégiales en métiers d’art et design, option verre, du Sheridan College. Le collège a été une pierre de touche pour la communauté du verre depuis le lancement de cette option en 1969. Personne n’aurait pu prédire la longévité du programme ni la nouvelle direction que le collège a adoptée, il y a deux ans déjà, en créant un programme de baccalauréat en métiers d’art et design. Ce changement s’est concrétisé par une approche pluridisciplinaire et l’ajout d’une quatrième année d’études.

Je suis une des étudiantes de ce nouveau programme, mais tout comme le reste de ma cohorte, je suis extrêmement reconnaissante à ceux et celles qui m’ont précédée.

Dans un autre groupe, il y aurait peut-être eu de la discorde entre les deux factions. Pas dans notre cas. En première année, nous étions probablement un peu embêtants, comme de jeunes frères et sœurs voulant suivre à tout prix. Mais les étudiants de troisième année (comme on aime bien les appeler) se sont montrés patients! Ils nous ont encouragés et soutenus comme l’auraient fait des aînés de famille plus sages. Chacun d’entre eux, à sa façon, a laissé sur nous son empreinte.

Pour cet article, j’ai eu le privilège d’interviewer chaque étudiant diplômé. Avant cela, si vous m’aviez demandé si je les connaissais, j’aurais répondu que oui. En réalité, les entrevues m’ont montré que je savais peu de choses à leur sujet. J’ai appris ce qui les avait incités à travailler le verre, ce qui les avait inspirés et quels étaient leurs espoirs et leurs rêves pour l’avenir.

Certains d’entre eux travaillent au chalumeau, d’autres sont des passionnés de l’atelier de verre à chaud et d’autres encore préfèrent le coulage dans le sable et le moulage dans les fours. Chacun a sa façon unique d’aborder le matériau, mais ce qu’ils ont tous en commun c’est une passion pour le verre, un engagement envers l’excellence et le désir de simplement continuer à y travailler. Je vous invite donc à prendre le temps de lire leurs profils d’artiste et à les découvrir tout comme je l’ai fait – en tant que professionnels qui entament leur carrière dans le merveilleux monde du verre.

Cator, Will. Motorcycle (2016), borosilicate glass, 7”H x 3”W x 10”D. (Photo: Will Cator)

Cator, Will. Motorcycle (2016), borosilicate glass, 7”H x 3”W x 10”D. (Photo: Will Cator)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Vase (2016), Incalmo, murrini roll-up, 13”H x 7.5”W x 5”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Vase (2016), Incalmo, murrini roll-up, 13”H x 7.5”W x 5”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Bowl (2016), sculpted flower hot attached to blown bowl, 6”H x 9”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Crozier, Geoff. Untitled Bowl (2016), sculpted flower hot attached to blown bowl, 6”H x 9”D. (Photo: Chace Giardino)

Davis, Melani. The Rose (2014), kiln cast glass, 15”H x 5.5”W x 2.5”D. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. The Rose (2014), kiln cast glass, 15”H x 5.5”W x 2.5”D. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. Rough Water (2016), fused glass, 18”H x 28”W. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Davis, Melani. Rough Water (2016), fused glass, 18”H x 28”W. (Photo: Melani Davis)

Di Mascio, Eric. Currents (2016), glass, canvas, 72”H x 24”W. (Photo: Calyssa Erb)

Di Mascio, Eric. Currents (2016), glass, canvas, 72”H x 24”W. (Photo: Calyssa Erb)

Di Mascio, Eric. Phantom Limb Calf, (2016), cast glass, prosthetic thigh and foot, 20"H x 5"W x 5”D. (Photo: Eric Di Mascio)

Di Mascio, Eric. Phantom Limb Calf, (2016), cast glass, prosthetic thigh and foot, 20″H x 5″W x 5”D. (Photo: Eric Di Mascio)

Fayad, Hannan. Untitled (2016), blown glass, sandblasted, 11” H x 11” D. (Photo: Hannan Fayad)

Fayad, Hannan. Untitled (2016), blown glass, sandblasted, 11” H x 11” D. (Photo: Hannan Fayad)

Ferguson, Reid. Jacob Street (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.5”H x 10.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. Jacob Street (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.5”H x 10.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. KW Railroad Set- (left to right) King and Victoria, Strange Street, Westmount and Westwood, (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.75”H x 8.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ferguson, Reid. KW Railroad Set- (left to right) King and Victoria, Strange Street, Westmount and Westwood, (2016), fused glass and concrete, 2.75”H x 8.25”D. (Photo: Reid Ferguson)

Ireson, Dani. Segment (2016), sandcast, graphite cast, and laminated glass, 15” H x 2.75” W x 2.75” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Segment (2016), sandcast, graphite cast, and laminated glass, 15” H x 2.75” W x 2.75” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Soft Mountain (2016), laminated float glass and stone, 4” H x 3.5” W x 1.5” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Ireson, Dani. Soft Mountain (2016), laminated float glass and stone, 4” H x 3.5” W x 1.5” D. (Photo: Rachelle Ireson)

Kimber, Loni. in(FINITE) (2016), blown glass, concrete, 27.5” H x 5.7” W x 6.5”D. (Photo: Loni Kimber)

Kimber, Loni. in(FINITE) (2016), blown glass, concrete, 27.5” H x 5.7” W x 6.5”D. (Photo: Loni Kimber)

Legere, Angela. Yvonne (2016), fused glass body cast, 19”H x 14” W (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Yvonne (2016), fused glass body cast, 19”H x 14” W (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Nesting Bowls (2016), cast glass, Set of 3 – 6”D, 8”D, 10”D. (Photo: Angela Legere)

Legere, Angela. Nesting Bowls (2016), cast glass, Set of 3 – 6”D, 8”D, 10”D. (Photo: Angela Legere)

Lepiez, Christian. Ninja Pendant (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, 2” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Ninja Pendant (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, 2” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Holy Balls (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, various sizes from 3” to 6” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Lepiez, Christian. Holy Balls (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, various sizes from 3” to 6” D. (Photo: Christian Lepiez)

Leung, Phebe, Mitty Scolds Bitties (2016) Blown glass, hot sculpted, crocheted, 4.7”H  x 5.5”W x 10”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Mitty Scolds Bitties (2016) Blown glass, hot sculpted, crocheted, 4.7”H x 5.5”W x 10”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Feather Bowl (2016), blown glass, 3”H x 4”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Leung, Phebe, Feather Bowl (2016), blown glass, 3”H x 4”D. (Photo: Phebe Leung)

Lozanovski, Lila. Satori 5.2 (2014), float glass, cotton thread, 9.8”H x 13.75”W. (Photo: Jade Chittock)

Lozanovski, Lila. Satori 5.2 (2014), float glass, cotton thread, 9.8”H x 13.75”W. (Photo: Jade Chittock)

Lozanovski, Lila. Rose Bowl (2015), kiln cast glass, 5.5”H x 4.75”D x 4.75”W. (Photo: Lila Lozanovski)

Lozanovski, Lila. Rose Bowl (2015), kiln cast glass, 5.5”H x 4.75”D x 4.75”W. (Photo: Lila Lozanovski)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Kameosa (Sake Set), (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, Bottle - 10”H x 1 - 2.25”D, Glasses - 2.5”H x 2.5”D. (Photo: Chace Diargino)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Kameosa (Sake Set), (2016), flameworked borosilicate glass, Bottle – 10”H x 1 – 2.25”D, Glasses – 2.5”H x 2.5”D. (Photo: Chace Diargino)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Head Shots, (2014-15), flameworked borosilicate glass, various from 1” – 2.5”H x .75”D. (Photo: Nicholas Driver)

Walsh, Collin A.G. Head Shots, (2014-15), flameworked borosilicate glass, various from 1” – 2.5”H x .75”D. (Photo: Nicholas Driver)

Yule, Max. Glass Flora (2016), hot sculpted glass and cement, 18”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Glass Flora (2016), hot sculpted glass and cement, 18”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Untitled (2016), hot sculpted glass welded frame, 20”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

Yule, Max. Untitled (2016), hot sculpted glass welded frame, 20”H x 18”W x 18”D. (Photo: Max Yule)

 

Biographie de L’auteur: 

Paola Crossley est très contente de faire partie du premier groupe d’étudiants au programme de baccalauréat en métiers d’art et design du Sheridan College. Elle entamera la troisième année de son programme de quatre ans à l’automne.

 

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