Life Is Not Always Easy: The Alberta College of Art and Design

June 30, 2016

Author: Robyn Feluch

 

Since 1974, the furnaces and glory holes have heated the depths of the Alberta College of Art + Design. The basement is the home of 36-year glass blowers, casters and fusers—a family of glass artists. As with any family, you assume that members will always be there. But this year our glass department suffered a devastating loss when one of our instructors, Jim Norton, died suddenly on January 28th, 2016. He was a mentor, an encourager, an excellent instructor and a wonderfully talented glass blower. Jim brought a special spark to ACAD Glass that fueled the students to experiment, practice and keep creating. The department, which is a close knit group of 5 instructors, 36 majors and countless students, whom he taught, were left devastated by Jim’s death. But as a true family, we all came together to support each other through this loss. We used our feeling of love and respect for Jim as fuel for our artwork. In Memory of Jim, the ACAD glass department is starting a scholarship in his name. Please visit https://acad.ca/jim-norton to donate to Jim’s memorial fund.

Even with the death of Jim weighing on our hearts, life continues to go on and so did our year. We had a very successful Mug Night. During our Mug Night, some of Jim’s creations were auctioned off to benefit the scholarship in his name.

Our visiting artist this term was Dave Walter. As a department, we were able to watch four different demonstrations by Dave from hot sculpting glass to the techniques involved in enameling his narrative pieces. Along with the skills he showed us, he gave us valuable feedback on what it takes to be a part of the glass industry. I am sure these lessons and insights will stay with us as we continue our individual glass practices. As we finish off our year and graduate 10 of our glass major students into the larger world of glass, we should give a special thank you to all of our talented instructors who give us their support, knowledge and skills in order to help us on our journeys.

 

Wiznura, Declan. Skate or Die (2016) 32”x8”x4” Fused and slumped printed glass

Wiznura, Declan. Skate or Die (2016) 32”x8”x4” Fused and slumped printed glass

 

Wiznura, Declan. Traffic Cones (2016) 8”x8”x7”, 8”x8”x7”, 8.5”x8.5”x8” Blown Glass

Wiznura, Declan. Traffic Cones (2016) 8”x8”x7”, 8”x8”x7”, 8.5”x8.5”x8” Blown Glass

 

Declan Wiznura 
Declan Wiznura combines prints, which are inspired by marks associated with graffiti, with blown glass in order to achieve the patterns he desires on his forms. Glass is produced in a moment that cannot be recreated: there is only one chance at production. Glass is made under pressure, both literally and figuratively. There is one opportunity for success or failure. Graffiti is created in one continuous movement, the marks created cannot be recreated therefore everything is produced in a continuous motion. This moment of creation is a core principle of graffiti culture. Declan has created a series of prints, rollups and pieces based on these ideas using marks found in graffiti. The use of glass powder to print creates a visual texture that is unique to its material. The glass powder also mimics the spray from an aerosol paint can, thus creating a strong visual bond between the influence of graffiti and the finished piece.

 

Gluszak, Brianna. Stigma (2016) Kiln formed and cold worked glass, cement

Gluszak, Brianna. Stigma (2016) Kiln formed and cold worked glass, cement

 

 

Brianna Gluszak

I’ve always found a sense of refuge within the wilderness, naturally it has become the subject of what I make. I often catch myself drawing out the details of different natural materials like wood, rock and water, focusing on the intricacies of the layout and how the material acts. Looking and drawing have become an act of meditation—allowing my mind to escape from the mundane of normal life. Then, approaching making, I use a process of embodied learning. I do a series of experiments and modify my ideas based off of my results. Only then do I start working on a finished product. I use depth and dimension within glass to challenge the viewer’s perception, giving him or her the opportunity to focus solely on looking. Looking acts as a form meditation within my methodologies. Through making I am giving the viewer the opportunity to engage in this form of meditation. The subtitles I place within the glass allow the viewer a further moment of contemplation.

 

Craypo, Taygan. Taffy (2016) hot formed glass

Craypo, Taygan. Taffy (2016) hot formed glass

 

Craypo, Taygan. Carved Taffy (2016) hot formed glass and cold worked glass

Craypo, Taygan. Carved Taffy (2016) hot formed glass and cold worked glass

 

Taygan Crapo 

Glass is hot fluid beauty. To work with glass you must gently direct it towards the outcome that you want. It is like riding an untrained horse, all you can hope for is to guide the forward momentum. Relaxed focus is the key. Hot glass has a hot candy consistency that requires constant motion to avoid disaster. If you miss a twirl or allow the glass to cool too quickly or unevenly, your vases will break into a thousand pieces. But, if your luck holds, you will have a split second that you can admire your vessel before it must be placed in the kiln to prevent shock cracks from forming. It will be at least 12 hours before you can admire it again. That is, if it survives the cooling process.

 

Harrill, Sarah. 1 (2016) Casted glass

Harrill, Sarah. 1 (2016) Casted glass

 

Harrill, Sarah. 2 (2016) Casted glass

Harrill, Sarah. 2 (2016) Casted glass

 

Sarah Harrill 

The Existential and Absurdist philosophies are what motivate my interests and artistic practices. The subject matters in my work are inspired by the nature that surrounds me. The themes explore nostalgic serene experiences that humans instinctively create with and of nature. By using crystal clear glass to cast the hybrid figures, they suddenly become ethereal entities that help confront our perceptions of reality and existence.

 

Feluch, Robyn. Icebergs Series (2016) Blown glass

Feluch, Robyn. Icebergs Series (2016) Blown glass

 

Robyn Feluch 

 

Authors Biography:

Robyn Feluch is a second year glass major at the Alberta College of Art and Design and an accomplished oil painter. Robyn grew up on an acreage in the Alberta foothills where she rode horses, attended 4-h and helped out with the neighbour’s cattle.  She enjoys the western lifestyle and considers herself “a good, clean cut, country gal that loves to paint and create glass.” Her passions include: horses, wildlife, painting and glass work.

 

La vie n’est pas toujours facile: The Alberta College of Art and Design 

Auteur: Robyn Feluch

 

Depuis 1974, fournaises et ouvreaux réchauffent les profondeurs du Alberta College of Art & Design. Son sous-sol héberge une famille de 36 artistes verriers qui travaillent le verre en le soufflant, le coulant et le fusionnant. Comme dans toute famille, on s’imagine que ses membres seront toujours présents. Malheureusement, Jim Norton, un de nos instructeurs, est décédé subitement le 28 janvier 2016. Quelle immense perte pour notre département du verre! Jim était un mentor, un motivateur, un instructeur hors pair et un souffleur de verre merveilleusement talentueux. Il avait cet enthousiasme particulier qui incitait les étudiants à expérimenter, à pratiquer et à continuer à créer. Son décès a littéralement chaviré le département de 5 instructeurs, 36 étudiants à la majeure, et un très grand nombre d’étudiants à qui Jim a enseigné. Mais, tout comme le ferait une vraie famille, nous nous sommes rassemblés pour nous soutenir dans cette épreuve. Notre amour et notre respect pour Jim ont été une source d’inspiration artistique. En mémoire de Jim, le département de verre de l’ACAD a créé une bourse en son nom. Prenez le temps de consulter ce lien pour faire un don au Fonds commémoratif en honneur de Jim : https://acad.ca/jim-norton.

Mais la vie continue, et nous avons poursuivi notre année scolaire malgré notre cœur alourdi par le départ de Jim. Notre soirée Mug Night a connu un vif succès et pendant cet événement, certaines des créations de Jim ont été mises à l’encan au profit de la bourse d’études créée en son nom.

Cette session-ci, Dave Walter était l’artiste invité du département. Nous avons pu assister à quatre démonstrations différentes données par Dave, de la sculpture du verre à chaud en passant par les techniques d’émaillage de ses œuvres narratives. Outre la présentation de ces techniques, Dave nous a aussi renseignés sur ce que ça prend pour faire partie de l’industrie du verre. Je suis certaine que nous n’oublierons pas ces leçons et observations dans le cadre de nos pratiques personnelles. Alors que l’année scolaire se termine et que dix d’entre nous feront leur entrée dans le grand monde du verre, nous devrions remercier tout particulièrement ces talentueux instructeurs qui nous appuient, qui partagent leurs connaissances et leurs talents afin de nous aider dans notre parcours.

 

Wiznura, Declan. Skate or Die (2016) 32”x8”x4” Fused and slumped printed glass

Wiznura, Declan. Skate or Die (2016) 32”x8”x4” Fused and slumped printed glass

 

Wiznura, Declan. Traffic Cones (2016) 8”x8”x7”, 8”x8”x7”, 8.5”x8.5”x8” Blown Glass

Wiznura, Declan. Traffic Cones (2016) 8”x8”x7”, 8”x8”x7”, 8.5”x8.5”x8” Blown Glass

 

Declan Wiznura 
Declan Wiznura combine des imprimés, inspirés de marques associées aux graffitis, avec du verre soufflé pour obtenir les motifs qu’il désire sur ses formes. Le verre est produit en un instant qui ne peut pas être recréé : il n’y a qu’une chance de production. Le verre est produit sous pression, littéralement et figurativement. C’est la réussite ou l’échec. Le graffiti est créé par un mouvement continu. Les marques créées ne peuvent être recréées et tout est donc produit en un mouvement continu. Ce moment de création est au cœur même de la culture du graffiti. Declan a créé une série d’imprimés mis en forme par enroulement, des pièces conçues d’après cette idée d’utiliser les marques retrouvées dans les graffitis. L’utilisation de poudre de verre pour l’impression crée une texture visuelle qui est unique à son matériau. La poudre de verre ressemble aussi à la pulvérisation d’une peinture en aérosol, créant ainsi un lien visuel évident entre l’influence du graffiti et la pièce achevée.

 

Gluszak, Brianna. Stigma (2016) Kiln formed and cold worked glass, cement

Gluszak, Brianna. Stigma (2016) Kiln formed and cold worked glass, cement

 

Brianna Gluszak

La nature a toujours été un refuge pour moi. J’ai toujours trouvé refuge dans la nature. Elle est donc tout naturellement devenue le sujet de mes créations. Je me surprends souvent à dessiner les détails de différents matériaux naturels comme le bois, la roche ou l’eau, et à apporter une attention méticuleuse aux subtilités de la disposition et à la façon dont le matériau agit. Pour moi, l’observation et le dessin sont devenus des actes méditatifs – cela permet à mon esprit d’échapper à la banalité de la vie normale. Puis, quand vient le temps de la création, j’utilise un processus d’apprentissage personnifié : je fais une série d’expériences et je modifie mes idées d’après mes résultats. Ce n’est qu’après que je commence à travailler sur le produit fini. Je me sers de la profondeur et de la dimension au sein du verre pour stimuler la perception du spectateur, lui donnant l’occasion de se concentrer uniquement sur l’observation. L’acte d’observer est une forme de méditation dans le contexte de ma méthode. Par ma création, je donne au spectateur l’occasion de participer à cette forme de méditation. Les sous-titres que je place à l’intérieur du verre offrent au spectateur un moment additionnel de contemplation.

 

Craypo, Taygan. Taffy (2016) hot formed glass

Craypo, Taygan. Taffy (2016) hot formed glass

 

Craypo, Taygan. Carved Taffy (2016) hot formed glass and cold worked glass

Craypo, Taygan. Carved Taffy (2016) hot formed glass and cold worked glass

 

Taygan Craypo 

Le verre est un fluide chaud d’une grande beauté. Pour le travailler, vous devez le diriger avec douceur vers le résultat souhaité. C’est comme monter un cheval non dressé : il faut seulement espérer pouvoir orienter son mouvement. La concentration détendue est la clé. Le verre chaud a la consistance du bonbon chaud; un constant mouvement est requis pour éviter un désastre. Si vous ratez une boucle ou laissez le verre se refroidir trop rapidement ou de façon non uniforme, vos vases vont se rompre en mille morceaux. Mais, si vous avez de la chance, vous aurez une fraction de seconde pour admirer votre récipient avant de devoir le placer dans le four pour éviter la formation de fissures dues au choc thermique. Puis, il vous fait attendre au moins 12 heures avant de pouvoir l’admirer de nouveau, si et seulement si la pièce survit au processus de refroidissement!

 

Harrill, Sarah. 1 (2016) Casted glass

Harrill, Sarah. 1 (2016) Casted glass

 

Harrill, Sarah. 2 (2016) Casted glass

Harrill, Sarah. 2 (2016) Casted glass

 

Sarah Harrill 

Ce sont les idéologies existentielles et absurdes qui m’intéressent et motivent mes pratiques artistiques. Les sujets de mon travail sont inspirés de la nature qui m’entoure. Les thèmes explorent des expériences sereines et nostalgiques que les hommes créent de façon instinctive avec et d’après la nature. En utilisant du verre transparent pour mouler des figures hybrides, elles deviennent soudainement des entités éthérées qui nous aident à confronter nos perceptions de la réalité et de l’existence.

 

Feluch, Robyn. Icebergs Series (2016) Blown glass

Feluch, Robyn. Icebergs Series (2016) Blown glass

 

Robyn Feluch 

 

Biographie de L’auteur:

Robyn Feluch est étudiante en deuxième année de majeure au Alberta College of Art and Design. Elle est aussi une artiste-peintre accomplie. Robyn a grandi sur une terre dans les contreforts albertains où elle se promenait à cheval, était membre des 4H et aidait ses voisins avec leur bétail. Elle aime le mode de vie de l’Ouest et elle se considère comme une vraie fille de la campagne qui adore peindre et créer des articles en verre. Elle se passionne pour les chevaux, la faune, la peinture et le travail du verre.

 

 

Share

Leave a Reply

//